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Is c++ gonna die


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#121 duke   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 14 January 2004 - 01:52 PM

isnt visual studio .net written in C#? Isnt visual studio .net SLOW AS HELL compared to visual studio 6?


nuff said

and yes i know that is not very scientific

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#122 WiseElben   Members   -  Reputation: 250

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Posted 14 January 2004 - 02:06 PM

quote:
Original post by SmugBoy
Wasn’t C# created to compete against Java? C# hooks into the .net framework just like java hooks into the Java Virtual Machine (JVM).

So I do not think that C++ will go away anytime soon. It’s still way too important in the marketplace on all platforms to just be cast aside. In fact I do not see many universities teaching C# yet.



Didn''t MS make J++ (Or J#) to compete w/ Java? But why would someone would try to compete w/ Java? Java is multi-platform, while the .NET framework is still being ported, right?

Will C++ die? No, I don''t think so. Unless another language that is more powerful, faster, easier syntax, and better than C++ arrives, it won''t die.





"Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man how to fish and he will eat for a life time."
-Chinese Proverb

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#123 phantom   Moderators   -  Reputation: 7035

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Posted 14 January 2004 - 02:15 PM

can anyone think of a language which has died thanks to another coming along?
All languages have their uses, the trick is to pick the right one for the job and have a wide enuff toolbox of them that you can pick and choose.
C# isnt going to be applicable everywhere, but then neither is C++ or even C.

#124 smitty1276   Members   -  Reputation: 560

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Posted 14 January 2004 - 08:45 PM

If you want to look at it that way, nothing ever "dies".

VHS didn''t kill beta because someone, somewhere still uses beta. 8-tracks are still alive and kicking, because my grandpa has one.

That standard is unrealistic though.

Visual Basic killed BASIC, despite the fact that there are still flavors of 32-bit BASIC out there that can do a lot of the things C/C++ can. It is essentially dead.

FORTRAN, etc., are actually dead. Just because some 25 year old legacy code is begin maintained doesn''t mean the language is still ''alive''.


Anyway...


#125 Arild Fines   Members   -  Reputation: 968

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Posted 15 January 2004 - 12:33 AM

quote:
Original post by duke
isnt visual studio .net written in C#? Isnt visual studio .net SLOW AS HELL compared to visual studio 6?


No, it is written in C++.
quote:

nuff said

Nope, you still have to apologize.

#126 Imperil   Banned   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 15 January 2004 - 02:15 AM

quote:
Original post by duke
isnt visual studio .net written in C#? Isnt visual studio .net SLOW AS HELL compared to visual studio 6?


nuff said

and yes i know that is not very scientific


nope.. it was written in C++

It is only slow on slow-ass machines. The workstations I use for coding zip with Visual Studio.NET, but my old machines lag when opening it.


#127 Kars   Members   -  Reputation: 184

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Posted 15 January 2004 - 08:17 AM

C/C++ will die 15 years after COBOL dies.

#128 TangentZ   Members   -  Reputation: 379

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Posted 15 January 2004 - 08:30 AM

Aliens will land on Earth and conquer us. We will all have
to speak their language and use their computers. So it
won''t matter any more.



Kami no Itte ga ore ni zettai naru!

#129 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

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Posted 15 January 2004 - 08:39 AM

quote:
Original post by Imperil

Actually the majority of the top schools don''t teach C or C++, they in fact teach Java, Scheme, SmallTalk, etc like I previously mentioned.

I know for a fact that even if you look at the top 20-30 schools you would be hard-pressed to find one that teaches C/C++.


Mine is #10 or so and while Java is taught, C/C++ is the standard for intro level classes. Java is taught for Data Structures, and ASM is taught for Operating Systems. More advanced data structure classes use Java, while stuff like Application Development & Graphic Interfaces use C/C++. I''ve attended 3 colleges thus far and I''ve never seen Scheme or SmallTalk offered.

All the Java classes seem to be taught by professors who spend half of the class peroid bragging about their Dungeons and Dragons campaigns, so that should give you a little perspective on that kind of people who push for Java usage (terrible idea) - nerdy, corpulent, and so virulently anti-Microsoft it makes you laugh.

#130 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

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Posted 31 March 2004 - 11:36 AM

quote:
Original post by smitty1276


FORTRAN, etc., are actually dead. Just because some 25 year old legacy code is begin maintained doesn''t mean the language is still ''alive''.


Anyway...




It''s not only legacy code being maintained. I have seen academic writing new, original XL Fortran code, only 2 years ago.

#131 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

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Posted 31 March 2004 - 11:38 AM

quote:
Original post by Imperil
quote:
Original post by _vizual_
Schools still teach C/C++ as the primary language in degree programs and that is what graduate students know. Application development proceeds with C/C++ due to the simple fact that it is the defacto language in which developers are comfortable with developing in.



Actually it depends on what schools. The top schools in the world for comp sci and software engineering don''t teach C++ at all.




What schools are you referring to? I went to a top-20 US school and they were teaching C++ (along with some of the others you mentioned) up until a couple of years ago. C++ is still a de-facto standard in Universities in the US as far as I know.




#132 C-Junkie   Members   -  Reputation: 1099

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Posted 31 March 2004 - 12:01 PM

AP Necro''d.

#133 GnuVince   Members   -  Reputation: 259

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Posted 31 March 2004 - 12:56 PM

I haven''t read the whole thread, but allow me to post my 2¢.

* C++ will not die, because so many programs use it that will need maintaining that the language will be around for a long time

* C++''s usage in the application market will (and is) tremendously diminishing due to Java and C#

* A language is not slow or fast. C is not faster than C# or C++ is not faster than Ruby or Common Lisp or O''Caml: some language implementations are faster than other. For example, the O''Caml native compiler is an extremely good one and it produces code that is as fast and often faster than code generated by GCC. But a language has no speed, a language is a means to express a solution to a problem. The fact that C++ is considered a fast language is because much work went into building strong and fast compilers

* C# implementations will need to include modern features. C# doesn''t even have an interactive interpreter for God''s sake! Many, many, many languages have that (Python, Ruby, Lisp, Scheme, O''Caml, SML, Erlang, Forth, Haskell, Smalltalk, etc.) This is, in my opinion an extremely important feature to learn a language, it allows interactive testing of language features

* About Sony or Nintendo not using C# because it''s a Microsoft language, give them time. First, there are two open source projects that try to bring .Net and C# to Linux and other platforms (Mono and dotGNU): they may use those or roll their own, the ECMA PDF is freely available.

* C# does have a improved productivity over C++. You need not to worry about pointers, memory allocation, etc. I say, the higher level a language is, the more productive it is (Lisp, Smalltalk, Python top my chart of productivity)

* The thing about "C# is never gonna catch on Linux", well you have before you a Linux guy who swore he''d never use C# ever when he first saw it, and who is now a big fan of Mono and C#. Mono/C# allows Windows .NET developers to become almost instantly productive on Linux (which is not so much the case with C or C++) and Linux developers who learn Mono (like myself) will be able to put .Net/C# on their resume. It may not become the most popular language, C will probably (unfortuneatly) keep that spot. But C# has much more to attract Linux developers than functional languages or Python or Smalltalk: it has a familiar syntax (no meaningful whitespace that so many dislike).

* I hope the future BIG language includes more modern features: a Hindley-Milner type-checking system with type inference for example (or dynamic typing with a soft typing checker), an all-expression language, simpler syntax (see Lisp or Smalltalk), the possibility to send code to a function (anonymous functions or blocks of codes like Smalltalk or Ruby).

That''s pretty much what I had to say. Good night.

#134 Doc   Members   -  Reputation: 586

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Posted 31 March 2004 - 05:17 PM

quote:
Original post by C-Junkie
AP Necro''d.


He''s right, though. And at least this thread isn''t 2 years old.

#135 Structural   Members   -  Reputation: 328

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Posted 31 March 2004 - 06:48 PM

I haven''t read the whole thread, but here''s my two cents:
The world of programming stretches further than desktop PC''s and Microsoft. 90% of all software is still written for dedicated hardware. Think of your microwave and car radio. C and C++ (the latter may be not so) are still the best languages to use for systems that don''t have tonnes of memory available for an OS and need low level access to the hardware.

#136 Sneftel   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 1776

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Posted 31 March 2004 - 06:55 PM

That makes four cents on this page. I think that''s more than adequate for such an over-exposed topic.


"Sneftel is correct, if rather vulgar." --Flarelocke




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