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Google Interview Questions


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#21 owl   Banned   -  Reputation: 364

Posted 08 February 2005 - 01:00 PM

Quote:
Original post by Stonicus
Quote:

Q: "You are shrunk to the height of a nickel and your mass is proportionally reduced so as to maintain your original density. You are then thrown into an empty glass blender. The blades will start moving in 60 seconds. What do you do?"

I quickly realize that even if I get out, I am only the size of a nickel, and will probably never get laid again, so I place my neck on the blade and close my eyes till my 60 seconds are up.


ROFLMAO! Best answer! :):):)

I would place myself laid down in the center of the wheel.

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#22 nuvm   Members   -  Reputation: 326

Posted 08 February 2005 - 01:24 PM

One might assume that since the blender is about to be turned on, that food will soon be entering, so I'd probably just put my neck to the blade rather than be suffocated by some raunchy health drink.

#23 Nietsnie   Members   -  Reputation: 270

Posted 08 February 2005 - 01:28 PM

Well, I would assume you would have some change on you (being Canadian with our loonies and toonies), and so I would chuck change up into the motor in hopes that it will somehow stall it. Then, I would take off all my clothes, tie them around the closest to center part of the blade, and then strap myself in between the clothes and blade under the blade. When it turns on (if it does), I would hopefully be swung round and round, probaly faint, but not die, and when it turns off I would then think of a way to get out.

#24 Cold_Steel   Members   -  Reputation: 835

Posted 08 February 2005 - 01:39 PM


It looks like you could just stand off to the side. It doesn't look like the blades would cause too much of a vacuum in air. They just look like flat blades. Eventually, I supposed running an empty blender would kill the motor.

#25 Raduprv   Members   -  Reputation: 997

Posted 08 February 2005 - 01:54 PM

Quote:
Original post by Cold_Steel
They just look like flat blades. Eventually, I supposed running an empty blender would kill the motor.

Why would it kill the motor? Placing too much load might kill it, but too little wouldn't.

Anyway, to the blender question, I don't think there is any way to survive. The clothes would be so small they are unlikely to stop the motor. And even if the motor is stoped, what can you do? Your clothes are not a rope, and you can't throw them over the edge. Even if you could, you'd need some sort of anchor at the other end so they won't fall back.
The correct answer would be: "Coming at peace with yourself and with the Universe" :D

#26 Witchcraven   Members   -  Reputation: 564

Posted 08 February 2005 - 02:00 PM

Since you are still alive, I assume somehow your biology was preserved. So that means your muscle mass is still in proportion to your total mass. Thus, my solution would be to jump out. Should I fail to make the jump, I would probably punch a hole in the blender upon my landing. Or if the blender was on its side, I would walk out. Or jump against the side, knocking it over. Considering my density/size ratio, I wonder if I could chew through the blades.

Hell, if you shot me at 2000 feet per seoond I could probably be used as an anti tank bullet.

Why such a complex stack growth solution. In a function, declare 2 local variables. Compare addresses.

#27 Raduprv   Members   -  Reputation: 997

Posted 08 February 2005 - 02:13 PM

Quote:
Original post by Witchcraven
Since you are still alive, I assume somehow your biology was preserved. So that means your muscle mass is still in proportion to your total mass. Thus, my solution would be to jump out. Should I fail to make the jump, I would probably punch a hole in the blender upon my landing. Or if the blender was on its side, I would walk out. Or jump against the side, knocking it over. Considering my density/size ratio, I wonder if I could chew through the blades.

Hell, if you shot me at 2000 feet per seoond I could probably be used as an anti tank bullet.

Why such a complex stack growth solution. In a function, declare 2 local variables. Compare addresses.


Only that it was stated that your mass is also reduced accordingly.

#28 Witchcraven   Members   -  Reputation: 564

Posted 08 February 2005 - 02:20 PM

ah. I thought it said you retained your mass. guess I should read it more carefully.

#29 Cold_Steel   Members   -  Reputation: 835

Posted 08 February 2005 - 02:21 PM

Quote:
Original post by Raduprv
Why would it kill the motor? Placing too much load might kill it, but too little wouldn't.
I assume they are designed to be run with some resistance. Sort of like if you run a water pump motor dry, it will burn out. Also, I just read somewhere that they may be designed for short use time spans, and not continuous use, so they could burn out that way too after 10 or so minutes.

[disclaimer]I don't even own a blender! What do I know!?[wink]

#30 Raduprv   Members   -  Reputation: 997

Posted 08 February 2005 - 02:27 PM

The water pump is different: the motor needs the water to cool itself. For a blender, it doesn't matter, because the motor cools itself with air.

#31 Cold_Steel   Members   -  Reputation: 835

Posted 08 February 2005 - 02:29 PM

Quote:
Original post by Raduprv
The water pump is different: the motor needs the water to cool itself. For a blender, it doesn't matter, because the motor cools itself with air.
I wonder for how long though. I suspect an average would tend to overheat at some point given the high RPM.

#32 cowsarenotevil   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2009

Posted 08 February 2005 - 02:34 PM

Quote:
Original post by kSquared
Q: "You are shrunk to the height of a nickel and your mass is proportionally reduced so as to maintain your original density. You are then thrown into an empty glass blender. The blades will start moving in 60 seconds. What do you do?"


Clearly they mentioned nickels for a reason. Simply use a now proportionately huge piece of pocket change to jam the blades in some way. :D

#33 Raduprv   Members   -  Reputation: 997

Posted 08 February 2005 - 02:38 PM

Quote:
Original post by Cold_Steel
Quote:
Original post by Raduprv
The water pump is different: the motor needs the water to cool itself. For a blender, it doesn't matter, because the motor cools itself with air.
I wonder for how long though. I suspect an average would tend to overheat at some point given the high RPM.


Many motors (big motors) have some sort of fan/propeler inside, so they draw air to cool themselves. Besides, if a motor is idle it will heat slower. But it depends on the motor, of course. Some are designed to run non stop, while others are designed to run for a limited time. A cheap blender will probably die if used too much, but a well build one will most likely run for quite a while.

#34 Cold_Steel   Members   -  Reputation: 835

Posted 08 February 2005 - 02:43 PM

Quote:
Original post by Raduprv
Many motors (big motors) have some sort of fan/propeler inside, so they draw air to cool themselves. Besides, if a motor is idle it will heat slower. But it depends on the motor, of course. Some are designed to run non stop, while others are designed to run for a limited time. A cheap blender will probably die if used too much, but a well build one will most likely run for quite a while.
Yeah, Google should at least tell you what brand they're using. There's a big difference between a high quality restaurant blender and a Wal-Mart POS.
Heh, you know what, I think I know how to answer all of Google's interview questions:
[google]

#35 qesbit   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 08 February 2005 - 03:24 PM

[quote]Original post by kSquared
Q: "You are shrunk to the height of a nickel and your mass is proportionally reduced so as to maintain your original density. You are then thrown into an empty glass blender. The blades will start moving in 60 seconds. What do you do?"

Ehh. Well I make alot of smoothies and stuff with blenders.. hehe.. ok.. watch if you drop a granola (or rice or something) on the blade just as you turn it on. It will shoot itself out of the blender (hopefully, sometimes it richochetes all over the place before flying out).

My guess is if you are that small, get on the blade and just as the blade turns on jump and you will ping pong right out of the blender and land about 20 feet somewhere arbritraily in your kitchen. Of course you will probably be dead anyways from slamming into the blender walls and flying all that distance...

Why do they ask questions like this anyways?

Oh, oops, I forgot it is usually because it is hitting the blades :-) My bad. I'd just google for the answer.

They didn't mention if it has a top on it though.

#36 Zahlman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 1682

Posted 08 February 2005 - 03:46 PM

Quote:
Original post by Witchcraven
Why such a complex stack growth solution. In a function, declare 2 local variables. Compare addresses.


Agreed. Of course, you will have to watch out for the optimizer reordering things. So you'll want to do it in assembly. (Of course, if you knew how to program in assembly on that platform, you'd probably already know the stack direction... :s )

#37 Coaster Kev   Members   -  Reputation: 268

Posted 08 February 2005 - 04:53 PM

Why not ask Google ... err... yeah

Funny Google Response

#38 golopart   Banned   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 08 February 2005 - 08:01 PM

LOL. You don't need to do any of that. Make a function. If the function has the C calling convention then parameters on the right of the prototype will be pushed on first. Compare the address of two parameters. If the lefter parameter has a smaller address then the stack grows from high to low memory. Adjust according to calling convention. Newbies.

#39 bakery2k1   Members   -  Reputation: 712

Posted 08 February 2005 - 08:07 PM

Quote:
Original post by golopart
LOL. You don't need to do any of that. Make a function. If the function has the C calling convention then parameters on the right of the prototype will be pushed on first. Compare the address of two parameters. If the lefter parameter has a smaller address then the stack grows from high to low memory. Adjust according to calling convention. Newbies.


What if the parameters are passed in registers?

#40 golopart   Banned   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 08 February 2005 - 08:14 PM

Then it's a fastcall calling convention. Is there a language where you can't choose to pass data on the stack? (don't say Java)

My point was to reduce the number of steps to find a solution. kSquared said call a function and another function in it. Someone else said declare two local vars. It seems to me that in any language that has those capabilities also has the capability of just doing:

void __cdecl lol(int a, int b)
{
print(&a);
print(&b);
}

But really I was just being a smart ass.




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