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Xbox 360, Ps3, Nintendo Revolution Coding


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#101 Homers Pal   Members   -  Reputation: 164

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 10:01 AM

Quote:
Original post by Warvstar
Here is proof of TSE running on Xbox360, it sells through Live Arcade.
http://www.xboxcircle.com/portal/content/view/697/1/


Oh I know Garage Games have a 360 title int he works, they've got a lot of development experience and a game the Microsoft want...you however do not....Having access to the public version of the Torque engine does not mean you can write for the 360...please wake up.


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#102 Warvstar   Members   -  Reputation: 136

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 10:11 AM

You are a little slow. It is not in the works it is released. Microsoft is letting Indies write games for the Xbox360. You havent even seen my game, so you would not know if Microsoft would want it. Also I have family who work for Microsoft, even I have worked for them in the past, now I mainly work on simulators for the U.S. Army. Yes I have proof of that too.

#103 nuvm   Members   -  Reputation: 326

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 11:11 AM

Okay, it's one thing to point someone's expectations back towards reality, but do people have to be such #$%@-heads?

Can you get on the 360/PS3/Revolution without working for a major publisher on a AAA title? Yes/Not likely/Maybe.

If you're a hobbiest/indie you are not going to make the next Halo, don't even shoot that high, you'll miss and hit your foot.

On the other hand, if you work hard, you might get enough done to convince an artist it'd be worth his while to lend a hand on the next Outpost Kaloki, Wik, or Marble Blast. Of course, before they even consider you, you're going to have to get it done for PC first, put it out on the market, and prove your game worthy.

All three of these games have been out for a while now, and were in development for a while before that, so if you want to get on the 360, get coding.



#104 HyperHacker   Members   -  Reputation: 136

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Posted 09 December 2005 - 08:57 PM

You know, you don't need any fancy expensive dev kits to code for consoles. That's where mod chips come in. In fact a lot of mod chips are designed specifically for this purpose. True, you won't get an official license for a game that only works on a modified console, but it lets you make some basic demos and get some experience coding for the console. Heck, some consoles openly allow home development, such as the GP32.

If you just want to make simple games and don't intend to sell them, homebrew is the way to go. Xbox 360 is the only console currently on the market that hasn't had a hack developed to run homebrew code, because it's only been out a few weeks. [wink] Once you get accustomed to console development, that's when you shell out for a devkit and official license. Really, the only difference is you get official libraries (as opposed to those written by other homebrewers) and the ability to legally sell your production.

I myself develop for Game Boy fairly often, and pending the purchase of some tools plan to do similar for Nintendo DS. Dev kit? Pah! I write all my GB stuff in raw ASM using 99% my own code (occasionally borrowing public code for functions I really don't want to go to the hassle of writing). I don't intend to sell any of it, it's just for fun.
---------------------------------dofile('sig.lua')

#105 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 19594

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 10:18 AM

Quote:
Original post by dazzford
Since this thread was dredged up, I figured I would post a reply.

from Anon poster
Quote:
Original post by Anonomous
"show me one hobby game in the top 20...go on? Top 40 then?"


Rollercoaster Tycoon. Designed and created by 1 person, Chris Sawyer. In addition he did all the add-on packs, and the sequal Rollercoaster Tycoon 2 and it's addons.

Granted it wasnt technically a "hobby", it was done by one person and easily reached the top 20, and at one point I believe it was in the top 5 (sales numbers), selling millions of copies.


Would you people quit spouting that?

Chris Sawyer's RTC was not a hobby game, nor was he a hobby developer.

He started up his own shop over five years before RTC was released. It was not done by one single person, but involved at least 28 people according to the credits. Sure, one guy had the idea and did most of the programming. And he did most of it in assembly because he thought it was fun, but it wasn't a fluke by a hobbiest.

From his bio:
1983, started writing games
1988-1993, ported several critically acclaimed titles
1993-1995, developed Transport Tycoon (and expansions) through Microprose
1996ish - 1999, developed RTC, released early 1999.

Yes, he did the design and all the gameplay implementation that matters in RCT, but not the graphics, not the music, not some of the interfaces, and so on. And there's a whole lot more than gameplay in a game.

From the credits, other than Sawyer:
* Graphics: Simon Foster
* Sound and music: Allister Brimble
* Additional Programming: FISH UK Ltd., Joe Booth, Nick Tuckett
* Representation: Jacqui Lyons (Marjacq Ltd.) Mmm, lawyers...
* Manual: Alkis Alkiviades, Timothy Beggs, Anton Lorton, John Possidente
* Layout: Louis Saekow Design
* Thanks to: Robb Alvey, Katie Brayshaw, Karen Cumming, Justin Garavanovis, European Coaster Club, Neil Jackson, Victoria Maclean, Martin Sawyer, Elizabeth Slater, Paul Slater, Graham Turner, Ruth Turner, John Wardley, Melanie Warn, Jim Wills (for help with research and game testing)
* Publisher information ....

Hobby game programmers don't have existing publication deals with Microprose, nor a creator with over a decade of experience then personally developing and publishing a major game with several expansion packs. They generally don't have source code from previous critically acclaimed titles and expansion packs. Allister Brimble (sound and music) had almost a decade of professional gamedev audio work and worked with him on earlier titles. Others on the list have similar experience.

That's more resources than most beginning professional studios have.

That is professional with Microprose publishing it.

frob.

#106 Keiyentai   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 25 December 2005 - 04:27 AM

Back on to the topic kind of lol. I think the OP would be better off trying to code for like the Dreamcast or PS2. Rumor has it Japan is going to be re-releasing the DC with comercial/homebrew games in Feburary. Could be his best bet.
------------------------------Owner of NeoSpawn Games

#107 Alpha_ProgDes   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4688

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Posted 25 December 2005 - 04:56 AM

Quote:
Original post by Keiyentai
Back on to the topic kind of lol. I think the OP would be better off trying to code for like the Dreamcast or PS2. Rumor has it Japan is going to be re-releasing the DC with comercial/homebrew games in Feburary. Could be his best bet.

where did you hear that from?



#108 KaptainKomunist   Members   -  Reputation: 300

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Posted 25 December 2005 - 01:28 PM

Quote:
Original post by Keiyentai
Back on to the topic kind of lol. I think the OP would be better off trying to code for like the Dreamcast or PS2. Rumor has it Japan is going to be re-releasing the DC with comercial/homebrew games in Feburary. Could be his best bet.


I hope you aren't talking about the Treamcast. Actualy, I hope you are, but that's been out for a while. Far from legal, but still quite nice.
Portable dreamcast

Considering that the DC did better in the US than it ever did in Japan, and they would have to reverse engineer the DC without breaking laws, and you have no source for your rumors... I'm calling crap.

#109 Alpha_ProgDes   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4688

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Posted 25 December 2005 - 01:32 PM

Quote:
Original post by KaptainKomunist
Quote:
Original post by Keiyentai
Back on to the topic kind of lol. I think the OP would be better off trying to code for like the Dreamcast or PS2. Rumor has it Japan is going to be re-releasing the DC with comercial/homebrew games in Feburary. Could be his best bet.


I hope you aren't talking about the Treamcast. Actualy, I hope you are, but that's been out for a while. Far from legal, but still quite nice.
Portable dreamcast

Considering that the DC did better in the US than it ever did in Japan, and they would have to reverse engineer the DC without breaking laws, and you have no source for your rumors... I'm calling crap.

Source of rumor. The game is real but we'll see if they'll be actually producing real, brand new Dreamcasts or just selling refurbished one (also rumor).



#110 Keiyentai   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 02:31 AM

Well theres the page. You can look for your self. They seem like new systems but could be refurbs. Who knows. I think it's kind of cool though. Always been a fan of the DC

#111 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

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Posted 31 December 2005 - 10:42 AM

Wow,

Lets just tell everyone that dont ever make a game unless you are rich and know everyone on the inside. So the end result will be we get the same rehashed games that seem to be happening now? Evolution is important to this industry. If we tell young people to give up are we really looking towards the future?

For those young or new to game making. Start simple. From 2-D game programming (Cell phones, PDA's, Etc.) to modding on current game platforms such as Unreal Tournaments and Half Life 2 games offerings. Learn the technology and keep up with it because its always changing. Put simple games and ideas out there to show your talents. The more you can show off your potential the more likely you will get a response or some kind of position. It might not be the lead designer but even starting as a beta tester could help you on your way up. Dont expect lightning to strike. It almost never happens (but does) and if it does you will be limited (least in the first venture) until you have more experience.

Education. Although self taught is not a bad thing, it is almost a must to have some sort of programming degree and education. Its no cakewalk but a degree will pay off in the end.





#112 Retrep   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 12:33 AM

I'm surprised this was not mentioned in a thread about potential hobbyist development for next-gen systems:

Cell Software Development Kit and Simulator:

http://www.alphaworks.ibm.com/topics/cell?Open&S_TACT=105AGX01&S_CMP=HP&ca=dgr-dw01awintrocell

You need Fedora Core 4 to use it, but it's basically a full programming environment for Cell, that runs on x86. Obviously the simulation means that your code will run at a fraction of the performance of actual Cell hardware, but it is apparently cycle-accurate, which should let you determine how your code would run on actual hardware. There's also a pretty good pipeline analysis tool for the SPEs, sample code, etc.

With this, and nVidia's cG Toolkit etc., you can have a reasonably close approximation of the PS3 dev environment on your PC. Or at least, you could gain experience that would transfer readily to an actual kit.

If you want to wager that a PS3 linux kit will be available for homebrew, this would give you a big headstart. The code you write on the above SDK will transfer and compile without modification on Cell hardware, like PS3 (IBM used this very simulator for a long long time before they had Cell hardware available, to bring the software development up to speed).

Kind of funny that potentially the most challenging next-gen hardware (but then again, potentially also the most rewarding) is also the one that is most open to hobbyists.




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