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Secondary Language:VB or Java?


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#1 BringBackFuturama   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 10:34 AM

After I'm done learning C++, I am going to take classes in another language. My school has Visual Basic and Java...and maybe others I haven't looked into. I realize that Visual Basic is a very GUI-oriented langauge, but what about Java? I don't know much about it besides that it's very common for web development. Which one would be more useful as a langauge? And what about stuff like C#, javascript, Actionscript and such. These all seem interesting. I'm just a bit confused on where to go next.

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#2 TheTroll   Members   -  Reputation: 882

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 10:37 AM

I would sugggest C#. You get some of the rapid development that you get with VB but it has more depth, also it would feel a lot more like what you are used to.

theTroll

#3 vrok137   Members   -  Reputation: 241

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 10:39 AM

Quote:
Original post by TheTroll
I would sugggest C#. You get some of the rapid development that you get with VB but it has more depth, also it would feel a lot more like what you are used to.

theTroll


I second C# too. Java is kind of wierd when it gets into GUI/SWING/AWT/whatever. I never understood that part of Java, especially the 6+ different type of layouts. Visual Basic is good, but I would reccommend C# to the top.


#4 gpalin   Members   -  Reputation: 164

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 10:47 AM

If you are comfortable with C++, Java and C# should not be difficult to pick up due to the similarities in syntax.

Visual Basic is something different (some will say it's bad, but it's just different, and different is not a bad thing), the syntax is more english-like. Sure it has drag-and-drop features for forms and such, but you still have to write code to handle control events and the like.

Perl has a similar syntax to the C-type languages, but is also different in a number of ways. It's tricky, but if you understand it well enough it can be very powerful.

javascript is intended for use on the web, and is similar to C++ also, so it is not difficult to learn.

The bottom line is, in my opinion, no one language is "the best". They are all different, though some may share similarities. The language to use depends on the situation. If you want to do a Windows application, look at VB or C#. If you're looking for web-based, or platform-independant, languages, there's Perl and Java. If you want raw power for applications such as games, use C++.

Draw one from a hat and learn it. Do a project with it. Then learn another. Once you understand a few programming languages, learning more languages becomes easier, as the concepts are all the same. Only the syntax (and object names) is different.
Grant Palin

#5 tanakas   Members   -  Reputation: 138

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 10:53 AM

I think, when people are referring to VB they now refer to VB.NET, unless you are one of those poor souls forced to maintain a legacy Visual Basic 6 (or earlier) application. If you happen to prefer Visual Basic's syntax, you can learn VB.NET instead of C#, they are almost completely functionally equivilant. But if you haven't invested time learning an earlier VB (or if you did, and hate it) you might as well learn C#.

#6 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 11:09 AM

I recommend Java. There are lots of advantages over C# and VB:

- It works on operating systems other than Windows (100%);
- It's present on lots of spaces, mainly, but not limited to, Enterprise computing, mobile devices and desktop;
- It's part of Java's culture the community to participate a lot, so we have more open source frameworks and libraries than .Net;
- It keeps compatibility between versions, unlike Microsoft;
- Great development environments such as Eclipse, that in my opinion beats Visual Studio when configured with the appropriate plug-ins. Or Netbeans, IntelliJ. In this area Java is very rich;

Go Java.

#7 Lazy Foo   Members   -  Reputation: 1092

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 11:40 AM

Java.
Learn to make games with my SDL Tutorials.
Transition from OpenGL 2 to modern OpenGL using my OpenGL Tutorial.

#8 Telastyn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3692

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 11:46 AM

Quote:
Original post by BringBackFuturama
After I'm done learning C++...


*chuckle*

Anyways, C# is a good choice after you stop learning C++.



#9 Alpha_ProgDes   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4506

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 11:46 AM

Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
I recommend Java. There are lots of advantages over C# and VB:

- It works on operating systems other than Windows (100%);

True.
Quote:
- It's present on lots of spaces, mainly, but not limited to, Enterprise computing, mobile devices and desktop;

True.
Quote:
- It's part of Java's culture the community to participate a lot, so we have more open source frameworks and libraries than .Net;

That's not a plus or minus... that's a "feature".
Quote:
- It keeps compatibility between versions, unlike Microsoft;

That's the greatest flaw of Java in my opinion. I'd wish they'd structure the libraries to be more intuitive and not have them so unwieldly.
Quote:
- Great development environments such as Eclipse, that in my opinion beats Visual Studio when configured with the appropriate plug-ins. Or Netbeans, IntelliJ. In this area Java is very rich;

Really, VS works just fine. Very intuitive, helpful and makes coding time faster. It's nice that you can use 4 or 5 different IDEs for Java, but I'd rather one that works well. I've used Dev-C++ and Visual C++ Express. I can say that I rarely ever use Dev-C++ anymore.

Quote:
Go Java.

...Yeah programming languages and intuitive libraries and IDEs [smile]



#10 chollida1   Members   -  Reputation: 532

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 11:47 AM

Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
I recommend Java. There are lots of advantages over C# and VB:

- It works on operating systems other than Windows (100%);


HaHaHa,

Oh wait, were you serious??

Just try porting a java program to another OS. You'll find your self cursing incompatable jvm's, oh and OS X's jvm for 1.4 broke drag and drop so you patched that and then they fixed it in 1.5 so your patch broke that and then linux is 2 versions behind so you have to rewrite all that gui code you wrote on windows.

Yep java is 100% compatable.... oh wait, maybe its not:(

Just some of the real world problems we've run into using java.

Cheers
Chris

#11 Frequency   Members   -  Reputation: 442

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 11:56 AM

I recommend Ruby because I'm a fanboy and it's great for getting stuff done, provided Frames-per-Second is not your metric of success for apps & tools. It can be bound to C++ for scripting, too.

#12 OrangyTang   Members   -  Reputation: 1294

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 12:00 PM

Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
Quote:
- Great development environments such as Eclipse, that in my opinion beats Visual Studio when configured with the appropriate plug-ins. Or Netbeans, IntelliJ. In this area Java is very rich;

Really, VS works just fine. Very intuitive, helpful and makes coding time faster. It's nice that you can use 4 or 5 different IDEs for Java, but I'd rather one that works well. I've used Dev-C++ and Visual C++ Express. I can say that I rarely ever use Dev-C++ anymore.

Visual Studio and Dev-C++ don't even come close to the functionality and general all-round goodness that Java IDEs like Eclipse have. Anyone who says otherwise clearly hasn't actually used them.

This is (mainly) a language thing - C++'s convulted syntax and pleathora of special cases makes it very hard to produce intelligent parsers for it - Java has a much more consistent syntax (or, depending on your view, 'simpler', and is probably why people get put off of Java). This means that IDEs can actually do much more intelligent things with your code.

You only have to use the context-aware search or the refactoring tools to see just how far ahead they are of anything in the C++ world.

#13 Promit   Moderators   -  Reputation: 4665

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 12:10 PM

Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
- It's part of Java's culture the community to participate a lot, so we have more open source frameworks and libraries than .Net;
That's complete bullshit.
Quote:
- It keeps compatibility between versions, unlike Microsoft;
Causes more problems than it solves. Each newer .NET version is mostly compatible, although the library may have breaking changes, anyway.
Quote:
- Great development environments such as Eclipse, that in my opinion beats Visual Studio when configured with the appropriate plug-ins. Or Netbeans, IntelliJ.
Now that VS 2005 provides (incredibly long overdue) refactor support and a few other things, I'd be real hesitant to say that Eclipse is more powerful.
Quote:
Visual Studio and Dev-C++ don't even come close to the functionality and general all-round goodness that Java IDEs like Eclipse have. Anyone who says otherwise clearly hasn't actually used them.
Apples and oranges. VS' C++ intellisense is indeed inferior to Eclipse's Java intellisense. But VS' C# intellisense is vastly more capable than Eclipse's Java intellisense.

#14 OrangyTang   Members   -  Reputation: 1294

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 12:25 PM

Quote:
Original post by Promit
Quote:
Visual Studio and Dev-C++ don't even come close to the functionality and general all-round goodness that Java IDEs like Eclipse have. Anyone who says otherwise clearly hasn't actually used them.
Apples and oranges. VS' C++ intellisense is indeed inferior to Eclipse's Java intellisense. But VS' C# intellisense is vastly more capable than Eclipse's Java intellisense.

Just to be clear, I'm talking about using Visual Studio for C++. I havn't used it for C# but I gather they've actually made big strides in this area, which is about time. [grin]

I accept that lots of people just aren't going to like Java, and that it's got it's (numerous) flaws. But it really irks me when people think that Visual Studio (again, in it's C++ incantation) is the be-all and end-all of IDEs. It's not, it's vastly outdated and very, very clunky. But people are happy in their little rut, so Visual Studio (again, C++ version) will continue to be used absolutely everywhere.

#15 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 02:08 PM

Quote:
Original post by chollida1

HaHaHa,

Oh wait, were you serious??

Just try porting a java program to another OS. You'll find your self cursing incompatable jvm's, oh and OS X's jvm for 1.4 broke drag and drop so you patched that and then they fixed it in 1.5 so your patch broke that and then linux is 2 versions behind so you have to rewrite all that gui code you wrote on windows.

Yep java is 100% compatable.... oh wait, maybe its not:(

Just some of the real world problems we've run into using java.


Yes, I am serious. I have been working with Java for some years now. My development machine is a Windows XP, the machines the application runs are AIX, Solaris and Linux.

Shut up, please. I am f***** tired of hearing this crap when in fact I have a few projects in this very laptop I'm using to type this message that go completely AGAINST what you are saying. Not to mention my real life experience as a developer for the last years.

BTW, I don't need to "port" a Java application to other platforms, it just runs! :)



#16 chollida1   Members   -  Reputation: 532

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 02:12 PM

Well then perhaps your a better developer than I am. As I said in my post, all the items I posted were real world problems I encountered with java, where write once run anywhere was no where near working.


But don't take my word for it, just goolge "java porting"

Cheers
Chris

#17 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 02:26 PM

Quote:
Original post by Promit
That's complete bullshit.


Really?

http://jakarta.apache.org/

I believe only the Jakarta has more open source software for Java than .Net has.

Quote:
Causes more problems than it solves. Each newer .NET version is mostly compatible, although the library may have breaking changes, anyway.


How old are you? Have you ever developed anything professionaly? It takes time and money (M-O-N-E-Y) for migrating things from one version to another, and most companies don't have the "latest and the greatest" simply because they don't need to spend money if something is working.

And making the transition process easier and as painless as possible is a BIG PLUS for Java. That's why it's entrenched in the Enterprise. Open source folks are just crazy and Microsoft changes everything every two years for you to buy the next Visual Studio.

For you to have an idea, Java 6 will be released this year (it's in beta now) and my company still uses Java 1.3 for some projects and 1.4 for others. And before this job I made interviews in other companies that were migrating from Microsoft stuff to Java for:

- market demand: people wanted to run the applications on other OSes
- backwards compatibility: less painful (means cheaper) transitions

Quote:
Now that VS 2005 provides (incredibly long overdue) refactor support and a few other things, I'd be real hesitant to say that Eclipse is more powerful.


I am not hesitant at all. I didn't try this 2005 version, but the other ones were just like "going back in time" taking in consideration what I was used to in Java.

Quote:
Apples and oranges. VS' C++ intellisense is indeed inferior to Eclipse's Java intellisense. But VS' C# intellisense is vastly more capable than Eclipse's Java intellisense.


News for you: an IDE it's not only "intellisense". It's about all kinds of wizards and appropriate tools for many kinds of applications (desktop, web, etc), integration with other tools (version control, modeling...), refactoring you already know, "code review" features for inspecting your code and telling you probable bugs and issues, debugging (obvious), profiling, integration with web servers, DB servers and others, and many other goodies.

Eclipse comes naked, but with the appropriate plugins it's killer.

I am always learning and I don't have all the answers, but a trick or two I know.

#18 justo   Members   -  Reputation: 184

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 02:54 PM

Quote:
Original post by chollida1
Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
I recommend Java. There are lots of advantages over C# and VB:

- It works on operating systems other than Windows (100%);


HaHaHa,

Oh wait, were you serious??

Just try porting a java program to another OS. You'll find your self cursing incompatable jvm's, oh and OS X's jvm for 1.4 broke drag and drop so you patched that and then they fixed it in 1.5 so your patch broke that and then linux is 2 versions behind so you have to rewrite all that gui code you wrote on windows.

Yep java is 100% compatable.... oh wait, maybe its not:(

Just some of the real world problems we've run into using java.

Cheers
Chris


i'm not going to enter into this, cause if youre "done" with c++, java and c# are simple to pick up, but this is silly. i regularly develop on my dual boot linux/windows machine with my eclipse workspace shared on an external drive with *no* problems. i also pass things off to a coworker that develops soley on a mac with *no* problem. not only that, i do it with a jni linked library (lwjgl) which has a different lib for each platform. and it still works. shocking.

obviously swing is sometimes more problematic, but if drag and drop and legacy code is your worst problems, i'll give you maybe .5%.

#19 jfclavette   Members   -  Reputation: 1058

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 03:10 PM

Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by Promit
That's complete bullshit.


Really?

http://jakarta.apache.org/

I believe only the Jakarta has more open source software for Java than .Net has.


No. There MIGHT, just MIGHT be more Open Source software for Java, but that might be because Java is older. That's like saying there's more Open Source software in C than there is in Java. Duh.

Quote:

How old are you? Have you ever developed anything professionaly? It takes time and money (M-O-N-E-Y) for migrating things from one version to another, and most companies don't have the "latest and the greatest" simply because they don't need to spend money if something is working.


Funny, I run .NET 1.0 and .NET 2.0 applications concurrently just fine...

Quote:

And making the transition process easier and as painless as possible is a BIG PLUS for Java. That's why it's entrenched in the Enterprise.


They're pretty much toe-to-toe right now. And .NET is still growing, meanwhile, Java is shrinking...

Quote:
Open source folks are just crazy and Microsoft changes everything every two years for you to buy the next Visual Studio.


Why do they HAVE to upgrade again ? That's like saying: "I hate Java because they introduced generics and I don't use them in my old code." Well duh, use them in your new code ?

Quote:

For you to have an idea, Java 6 will be released this year (it's in beta now) and my company still uses Java 1.3 for some projects and 1.4 for others. And before this job I made interviews in other companies that were migrating from Microsoft stuff to Java for:

- market demand: people wanted to run the applications on other OSes
- backwards compatibility: less painful (means cheaper) transitions


Like the numbers of Java->.NET vs .NET->Java are even of the same order of magnitude. Are you trolling ?

Quote:

I am not hesitant at all. I didn't try this 2005 version, but the other ones were just like "going back in time" taking in consideration what I was used to in Java.


Your opinion. I've used both, and I disagree.

Quote:

News for you: an IDE it's not only "intellisense". It's about all kinds of wizards and appropriate tools for many kinds of applications (desktop, web, etc), integration with other tools (version control, modeling...), refactoring you already know, "code review" features for inspecting your code and telling you probable bugs and issues, debugging (obvious), profiling, integration with web servers, DB servers and others, and many other goodies.

Eclipse comes naked, but with the appropriate plugins it's killer.

I am always learning and I don't have all the answers, but a trick or two I know.


Select "Eclipse". Right-click. Refactor->rename identifier. "Visual Studio .NET". That's a wonderfully unbacked opinion. I can tell you VS is miles ahead of Eclipse. I must be right since I said it on the Internet.

#20 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 03:33 PM

so to answer the original question: not VB. i think most everyone whos shown up can agree on that, especially after youve learned some c++. everything else is just fanboy jingoism.




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