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So thats C++?


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#1 Tyler4000   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 29 October 1999 - 06:14 PM

So you can create software and games using C++, with alittle practice, right? To start from not knowing any C/C++ what would be the best book? I would kinda like it to have some sort of software with it but if it doesnt thats ok. I would like several feedbacks to chose from. I would like the books about under $40.00 some where in ther anyways.
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#2 Qoy   Members   -  Reputation: 127

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Posted 28 October 1999 - 07:26 PM

The first book I got, and the book I learned C++ from was Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days by Jesse Liberty. It took a little longer than 21 days, but it was well worth it! Also, if you can find it, there is a version that comes with an old version of the Borland C++ compiler for DOS and Windows 3.x.

#3 Zenroth   Members   -  Reputation: 127

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Posted 28 October 1999 - 09:12 PM

Take a look at http://www.mcp.com/personal/
It has online books. Including teach yourself c++ in 21 days,and alot of other c,c++,visual c++ books ect.

#4 CGameProgrammer   Members   -  Reputation: 640

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Posted 28 October 1999 - 09:32 PM

It really doesn't matter what book you use. Notice that whenever anyone asks this question, people always respond saying the best book is whatever one they happened to read first. They're all good. Intermediate-advanced C++ books are a different story, though.

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~CGameProgrammer( );


#5 Phillip Schuster   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 29 October 1999 - 01:00 AM

Hi !!

Well, I don't think I am the only one, but I learn while I do that. I study source-code, I modify it until I have understood how and why it works. You can read a book and learn all about classes. After a week or so you have forgot most of what you have read. If you are good in C, just get MSVC and do some MFC-Stuff. I think MFC is one of the best ways to learn C++, and you get results very fast. Get a book and read it. I have a lot of books here, but I only read parts of them when I need to learn something I don't know yet. But never forget to code, code, code .... !! Experiance is all !!

Phillip


#6 CoolMike   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 29 October 1999 - 04:00 AM

Hey, I learned C with the "C for Dummies" book. It is probably the easiest way possible to learn C (altough it doesn't go really deep), and then you can pretty easily learn C++. A lot of other books were just too tough for me when I didn't have a clue about programming in C/C++. And it only costs about $20. You could also probably check it out at the local library.

Mike


#7 Dave Astle   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 2307

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Posted 29 October 1999 - 04:27 AM

I think CGameProgrammer hit the nail on the head. Pretty much any introductory C/C++ book is going to be good enough, and there are several of them available for free online reading (www.mcp.com/personal is moving - or may have already moved - to www.informit.com, so check that out). Once you are done with that, I recommend C++: The Complete Reference, Third Edition by Herb Schildt. It's the most complete coverage of C++ I've ever seen, and it's easy to read.

#8 DogRobber   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 29 October 1999 - 01:31 PM

Herbert Schildt also wrote "C++ from the ground up."
A very good book that covers the basics.


#9 Aldacron   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 3236

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Posted 29 October 1999 - 06:14 PM

Well, if you want a book AND a compiler, Beginning Visual C++ (Ivor Horton?) comes with the introductory edition of VC++. The first half of the book teaches you C++, and the second half deals with the VC++. Useful because it teaches you how to debug and do other tricks. I wish I had seen that book when I started. The guy is a really good teacher.




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