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DirectDraw debugging tip....


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#1 felisandria   Members   -  Reputation: 739

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Posted 08 November 1999 - 09:01 PM

I mentioned this to Gorky the other day, and he suggested that I post it, so here goes...

I don't have the fancy two-monitor system for debugging, and everyone knows that in DirectDraw you rarely get lucky enough to have the ability to see your message boxes, so for really quick checks to see how far my code is getting in DirectDraw, I use PlaySound and pick an odd sound wave. It's one line, it's not affected by the screen lock of DirectDraw, and it's a really quick and easy way to narrow down the cause of the problem.

-fel


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#2 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

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Posted 08 November 1999 - 02:33 PM

That's a good idea I didn't think of, but I think using DirectDraw in windowed mode is a little easier, considering you can stepthrough the code and check the values of variables.

#3 Alastair   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 08 November 1999 - 03:34 PM

Try playing sounds inside a bubblesort at different pitches, depending on the indices of the swapped elements. It plays a little tune!

If you get bored of that try doing it with a quicksort. You get a different little tune!

It slows down the sort routine and annoys the users though :>


#4 Splat   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 08 November 1999 - 04:58 PM

Why not instead of playing a sound alternate between opening and closing the CD drive door hehe

- Splat


#5 Alastair   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 08 November 1999 - 05:11 PM

On a more serious note, I use a macro like this to debug DirectX programs.

#define VERIFYDX(x) verifydx(x, __FILE__, __LINE__)

And then I have a function...

void verifydx(HRESULT res, const char* file, int line)
{
if (res!=NOERROR)
{
fprintf(stderr, "Fatal error: DirectX returned code %x in file %s at line %d.\n", res, file, line);
exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}
}

What does this do? When you call a DX function, use the macro, e.g.

VERIFYDX(pDDraw->CreateSurface(...));

If it fails, the verifydx function will get invoked and it will output a message with the file containing the error and the line of the offending statement.

In my release builds, I redefine the VERIFYDX macro so it doesn't check the return code, e.g.

#define VERIFYDX(x) void(x)

Maybe I should add sound effects though...


#6 Jonathan   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 08 November 1999 - 06:38 PM

That file output idea is pretty much the same thing I do, except that I wrote a function that takes an HRESULT and returns a character string telling me what the actual error was. Much easier than trying to look it up

Jonathan


#7 felisandria   Members   -  Reputation: 739

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Posted 08 November 1999 - 06:44 PM

This is just for very rough locational debugging. If I can't get it from this then I go to the usual "logging it to a file" method.

-fel


#8 CJ   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 08 November 1999 - 09:01 PM

I too use a file writing system. It can narrow the problem exactly, while a wave file can be somewhere where the problem is not.

Isn't that right? I don't work with soundfiles nor with DirectSound. But in fast graphics you wouldn't know where the problem is....

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