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Best book to learn Java from?


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#1 Simpsons4261   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 02:52 PM

I was looking at learning c++ or visual basic first, and now I have ultimately decided on Java, because I here its easier than c++ and once you learn java you can easily transfer over to c++. So what are some good books to learn from?

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#2 Imtiaz   Members   -  Reputation: 400

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 03:18 PM

At first I wanted to recommend the free edition (3rd) of Thinking in Java. But I personally don't recommend it anymore as its a rather dated book. Java has changed a bit from version 1.5, and that edition is before that time. However if you wanted to purchase the newest edition (4th) you can look into it as a possibility. There is also Head First Java which seems to get some pretty good reviews for its unique teaching style. Certainly don't hesitate to check on amazon for other similar books and reviews and decide which you might like best.

#3 metalman666   Members   -  Reputation: 156

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 04:12 PM

You should also check out
Developing games in Java by David Brackeen.
This book will tell you about Thread pools, AI and lots of game specific stuffs.



#4 Imtiaz   Members   -  Reputation: 400

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 04:29 PM

Quote:
Original post by metalman666
You should also check out
Developing games in Java by David Brackeen.
This book will tell you about Thread pools, AI and lots of game specific stuffs.


That looks like a neat book for someone who is at an intermediate level of knowledge in java and also with basic understanding of some principles in computer science, but for him its a book he shouldn't dive into for a while since he is starting at a beginner level. It looks like a good book to aspire to learning from in the future though, but nothing more at this point, at least this is my advice to be taken at will. :)

#5 metalman666   Members   -  Reputation: 156

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 04:39 PM

Quote:
Original post by Imtiaz
Quote:
Original post by metalman666
You should also check out
Developing games in Java by David Brackeen.
This book will tell you about Thread pools, AI and lots of game specific stuffs.


That looks like a neat book for someone who is at an intermediate level of knowledge in java and also with basic understanding of some principles in computer science, but for him its a book he shouldn't dive into for a while since he is starting at a beginner level. It looks like a good book to aspire to learning from in the future though, but nothing more at this point, at least this is my advice to be taken at will. :)


Yes i do agree. That book a bit advanced. You can use it after getting a good grasp on the language.
Good luck!



#6 Simpsons4261   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 23 September 2008 - 09:31 AM

So anyone else have suggestions for books?

Anyone have suggestions if I should really truly start at Java before I spend 30+ bucks on a book?

[Edited by - Simpsons4261 on September 23, 2008 8:31:59 PM]

#7 arroyjose   Members   -  Reputation: 152

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Posted 23 September 2008 - 10:57 AM

So is your budget $30? If yes, then here are my suggestions.

The first Java book I read many years ago is published by Murachs. At the time I was really not that interested in Java so I overlooked how cool the book’s format really is. The book uses a “paired-page” concept. The code is in one page and the explanation of it in the next page of the book. If you are interested in a gentle introduction, while at the same time learning a few things about GUI and database programming I strongly recommend this book.

If you want something that delves into much greater detail you can’t go wrong with any of the Java books (after Java 1.5 of course) by Ivor Horton. His books cover many things that most people now think are unnecessary for a beginner programmer. For example, how to use streams to get data as opposed to the new and easier method of using the Scanner class. The Scanner class takes care of many things for you, but you don’t have any idea of what it’s doing, or why it works the way it does.

Now, I have heard a lot of good things about the book “Head First Java.” Since I have not read it I really can’t give you a description of why it’s good. However, it has a majority of positive reviews on Amazon.com, which is rare for a technical book. Thus, if I was in your position I would strongly consider this as a candidate.

At my university a variety of books have been used in the past three years and I will list them here, but these are more expensive, and in my opinion are worst for self study:

Big Java
Programming and Object Oriented design using Java
Java 5.0 Program Design

Lastly, once you are up to speed in Object Oriented programming you will need a strong foundation on Generic programming, or in this case, Java generics. The best reference in book form currently available is “Java Generics and Collections” by Maurice Naftalin and Philip Wadler.

And don’t forget to check your local library for these books before you buy them. Or at the very least check Half.com for discounts on the above books.

Best of luck.


#8 Simpsons4261   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 01:32 PM

So which one of these would I get?

http://search.half.ebay.com/beginning-java-horton_W0QQmZbooks


The top book I'm assuming but just making sure.

#9 daviangel   Members   -  Reputation: 600

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 03:21 PM

"Head First Java" is what I recommend. It's so good it's been emulated numerous times now by others so that must be saying something. It also covers Java 5.0 so it's not too out of date.
Also, you can download a couple of free chapters here to see if it suits you. Only people I can see image be turned off are those that think like Petzold who writes an entire programming book without a single picture!

Head First Java

Head First Java delivers a highly interactive, multisensory learning experience that lets new programmers pick up the fundamentals of the Java language quickly. Through mind-stretching exercises, memorable analogies, humorous pictures, and casual language, Head First Java encourages readers to think like a Java programmer. This revised second edition focuses on Java 5.0, the latest version of the Java development platform.

Only problem I had when I first read it was that it doesn't walk you step-by-step through setting up Java to work on your system and it uses the command line mainly to build java apps so if you don't already have Java installed on your system you have to work that all out for yourself.


#10 Simpsons4261   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 10:51 AM

Quote:
Original post by daviangel
"Head First Java" is what I recommend. It's so good it's been emulated numerous times now by others so that must be saying something. It also covers Java 5.0 so it's not too out of date.
Also, you can download a couple of free chapters here to see if it suits you. Only people I can see image be turned off are those that think like Petzold who writes an entire programming book without a single picture!

Head First Java

Head First Java delivers a highly interactive, multisensory learning experience that lets new programmers pick up the fundamentals of the Java language quickly. Through mind-stretching exercises, memorable analogies, humorous pictures, and casual language, Head First Java encourages readers to think like a Java programmer. This revised second edition focuses on Java 5.0, the latest version of the Java development platform.

Only problem I had when I first read it was that it doesn't walk you step-by-step through setting up Java to work on your system and it uses the command line mainly to build java apps so if you don't already have Java installed on your system you have to work that all out for yourself.


Is that book for like complete beginners though? Does it explain everything enough?




Also, which version of this book would I get if I were to order it?
http://search.half.ebay.com/beginning-java-horton_W0QQmZbooks
The top book or what?



#11 DevFred   Members   -  Reputation: 836

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 11:02 AM

Quote:

Quote:

"Head First Java" is what I recommend.

Is that book for like complete beginners though?

Yes.

#12 Simpsons4261   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 01:55 PM

Would you guys recommend Head First Java or Beginning Java by Ivor Horton more?




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