Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Books


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
9 replies to this topic

#1 Psylocybe   Members   -  Reputation: 130

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 22 June 2001 - 03:13 PM

I''m looking for some good texts on math and physics and couldn''t find any recomendations at the books section of gamedev. I have just a basic knowldege of algebra (high school). I just want to learn the stuff specific to game programming in general any help would be greatly appreciated.

Sponsor:

#2 jmg3   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 22 June 2001 - 07:19 PM

i''d suggest going to a university library and looking up titles that resemble "mathematical methods for physicists" and "introduction to linear algebra". then pick out the relevant material that you''re interested in. i like the math methods book by mary boas. my linear book was by david c. lay.

#3 grhodes_at_work   Moderators   -  Reputation: 1361

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 26 June 2001 - 06:09 AM

With just a basic knowledge of algebra, you may want to start with basic physics, and at the same time start learning a bit about linear algebra before you move on to more advanced physics.

I would recommend the following as a good basic physics text: "Fundamentals of Physics" by Haliday and Resnick. Its a Freshman college level physics book. Some of the things in there, such as projectile motion, are applicable to games. Plus, they cover conservation of linear momentum which is the basis for collision response. Good stuff and more suited to someone with your current math background.

I do have a good beginners book for linear algebra, unfortunately its at home right now and I don''t recall the author or title. This web page does list a few recommendations, but I can''t personally recommend these since I have not seen them:

http://forum.swarthmore.edu/linear/choosing.texts/rec.texts.html



Graham Rhodes
Senior Scientist
Applied Research Associates, Inc.

#4 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

Likes

Posted 26 June 2001 - 10:03 AM

"Mathematics for Computer Graphics Applications" is a very good book. Covers a lot of the maths needed for computer graphics, and in simple terms too, so you can understand easier. The Author is: M.E Mortenson
IBSN #: 0-8311-3111-X

#5 Dave Astle   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 2307

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 26 June 2001 - 10:43 AM

I''ll add whatever highly recommended books come up in this thread, so keep the suggestions coming.

#6 Dave Astle   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 2307

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 26 June 2001 - 11:14 AM

Okay, I''m trying to add the physics book Graham mentioned, and I''m not sure which version to add. The problem I''m running into is that on Amazon, Fatbrain, and even the publisher''s site, there are several different versions of the 6th edition, and none of these sources is clear at all about what the differences are. It seems like there are 2 or 3 ways to get it: as a single 1200 page, $120 book (the Extended version), as a two volume set, or as a three part set (I may be wrong about there being a two volume option). Graham (or anyone), which versions are you familiar with, and which would you recommend to our audience? I have the 5th edition, 2 volume set myself, and if memory serves, the first volume would be far more useful than the second to game developers. I''m guessing the same is probably true for the 6th edition as well.

#7 flame_warrior   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 26 June 2001 - 02:28 PM

Hi,

Doesn''t Resnick and Haliday have two parts - Part-1 and Part-2, because I have 2 parts of the book, ofcourse a very old edition.

By the way a very good book.

#8 Timkin   Members   -  Reputation: 864

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 26 June 2001 - 08:42 PM

That''s it, remind me of just how old I am. I have a copy of Halliday & Resnick that''s a single volume (and yes I think its also a 1st edition). 8^( Sheesh, where did I leave that walking stick???

A good introduction to the sorts of mathematical tools you will need can be found in the following two volumes

"Calculus" by James Stewart. Brooks/Cole Publishing Company
ISBN 0 534-21798-2
and the associated volume
"Linear Algebra for Calculus" by Heuvers, Kuisti, Francis, Ortner, Moak & Lockhart. Brooks/Cole Publishing Company
ISBN 0-534-15402-6

Halliday & Resnick is an excellent text on introductory physics and I would recommend it.

Tim


#9 jmg3   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 27 June 2001 - 02:32 PM

H&R is pretty dry no matter which volume you get.
much more readable is "physics" by hans c. ohanian.

of course, if you''re actually genuinely interested in
phyics, the feynman lecures on physics are a must-read.

#10 grhodes_at_work   Moderators   -  Reputation: 1361

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 28 June 2001 - 07:27 AM

Haliday and Resnick is available as separate parts 1 and 2, *or* as a combined book with both parts. The one I had in mind was part 1. Given the price, I highly recommend seeking out a used copy, which shouldn''t be too hard (in the USA at least) given that its a very popular book for introductory physics.

I agree with jmg3 that H&R is dry. But I do think that folks with just basic math skills could be more successful programming simple physics based on introductory physics than jumping right into something more complex.


Graham Rhodes
Senior Scientist
Applied Research Associates, Inc.




Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS