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Question from a beginner


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#1 Gandalf   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 17 December 1999 - 09:57 AM

How to check for collision in a game like Zelda, Chaos Engine etc ? Is every visible object a rectangle and when the player moves it check to see if the rectangles crosses? If the gameplan is a labyrint seen from above with many, many walls it must bee tough to write and demanding for the computer to update.

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#2 lshadow   Members   -  Reputation: 123

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Posted 07 December 1999 - 03:35 AM

It really doesn't take up too much of the computers time just to test for a collision. The simple way to do the collision testing would be to give each tile a certain id. Such as 0 if the player can't walk on it, and a 1 if they can.

#3 Gary   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 17 December 1999 - 09:57 AM

Collision detection is different depending on how your game is designed. If it is a 2d, or some for of tile based game, than yes use tile IDs.

3D collision detection is a little different because you need to choose how accurate you want to be.

If you have say a person one way is to use a bounding box, which is basicly a box fit right around the person and anything that fits in the box is considered a collision.

Though this collision detection is fast it is not accurate. Say the person has thier arms stretched out and the object colliding was underneath them, you will still get a collision because of the box around the person will catch it. (This is easier to show , than write)

So you have a choice, you can use boinding boxes for each part of a person or a more accurate, polytope.

This is basicly a very simplified version of the objects 3D mesh. You can than use this for collisions with more accuracy.

Gary





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