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FREE SOFTWARE GIVEAWAY

We have 4 x Pro Licences (valued at $59 each) for 2d modular animation software Spriter to give away in this Thursday's GDNet Direct email newsletter.


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&%#@)(^%@! WTF!


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#1 stealthoni   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 16 July 2001 - 10:43 AM

Okay, can someone explain "licensing" a game, that is, selling a game legally. I want to know about this for future reference. Microsoft''s site wasn''t much help, im very new at all this . Is there a cost? How long does the "license to sell" last, and does the STANDARD edition of Visual C++ 6.0 not give you that "this application can not be legally sold" bullsh#t when you run a program, cause I have the Introductory edition. ~oni

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#2 stevenmarky   Members   -  Reputation: 349

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Posted 16 July 2001 - 11:38 AM

No, the standard edition does not do that.
I don''t know anything about licencing either.......

#3 Kylotan   Moderators   -  Reputation: 3338

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Posted 17 July 2001 - 02:44 AM

Please use a meaningful subject for posts, cos it helps everybody...

If you want to legally sell your product, you need to compile it with a compiler that isn''t the Introductory version of Visual C++. One of the full versions would work, as would most other compilers (although there are some versions of Borland C that impose similar restrictions). You don''t have to license anything.

#4 evaclear   Members   -  Reputation: 162

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Posted 18 July 2001 - 03:35 AM

I believe you have your termanology a little mixed up.

"Licencing a game" has completely nothing to do with Microsoft Visual Studio. "Licencing a game" usualy refers to "Licencing a game engine" like quake 3. This is done when one group of developers approaches the makers of the game engine (in this case ID software) and gives them a large ammount of cash. ID Software then gives the said developers a Licence, and the engine source code. Which allows the developers to modify the existing game engine, while making their game.

"Licencing" as it applies to Microsoft Visual studio is covered in the "Licencing agreement" that you recieve apon purchase of Visual C++. The educational version has a wonderful popup box which keeps the user from distributing the product. The standard edition doesn''t have that limitation, however it is missing a few important tools such as a profiler. Pro Edition also does not have the limitation of the popup box, and it comes with the profiler. Enterprise edition, well quite frankly I don''t know what extras it has on top of the pro edition...


#5 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

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Posted 18 July 2001 - 03:55 AM

Where could one find a replacement profiler?

#6 Erebus   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 18 July 2001 - 12:33 PM

Is the educational edition the same as getting the Academic discount? I''m going to be buying VC++ 6.0 in a few weeks and I can get the academic discount but if I can''t distribute anything I''d rather just go with the full price.

#7 evaclear   Members   -  Reputation: 162

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Posted 20 July 2001 - 03:15 AM

Educational and Academic are 2 diffrent things.

The Academic version is the exact same thing that people buy in the stores. It is sold to students at a "discount" price. Which is normaly lower than retail. The only diffrence is that the licence with the Academic version, prohibits you from legaly selling the programs/applications you make with it.

The Educational version of Visual C++ usualy comes with books for free, and has a little annoying OK box which the end user must click on each time the program is run.




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