Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


Inverted Sin, How ?


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
5 replies to this topic

#1 granat   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 19 July 2001 - 01:26 AM

Is there a INVERTED SINUS function in C++ (Visual C++) ?? I mean instead of me giving the angle as parameter I give a number and receive the angle. I looked trough math.h but could not find it there... -- Look at you hacker. A Pathetic creature of meat and bone, panting and sweating as you run through my corridors. How can you challenge a perfect, immortal machine?-- "Yeah, I''ve seen people w/ ''so-called'' lives. They are petty and thoughtless." - Nazrix

Sponsor:

#2 Julio   Members   -  Reputation: 116

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 19 July 2001 - 01:29 AM

it''s in there, if you''re looking for an inversion of the sine function.

HHSDrum@yahoo.com
Polarisoft Home Page

#3 granat   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 19 July 2001 - 01:42 AM

I automatically searched through the math.h file with the following search words: INV, SINI, ISIN etc...

Nothing was found...





#4 Dormeur   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 19 July 2001 - 01:57 AM

Actually, the inverted function of the sin function is the arcsin or asin function. So try looking for asin.

Okay, I just looked it up. It''s the asin function.

Dormeur

#5 stevenmarky   Members   -  Reputation: 346

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 21 July 2001 - 10:07 AM

?why? -(sin) is the INVERTED SINUS function, right?
Or am I just confused..?

#6 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

Likes

Posted 21 July 2001 - 11:14 AM


stevenmarky:

An inverse trig function takes a value as it''s parameter, and returns the angle. So,



// using degrees

sin(45) = 0.7071
asin(0.7071) = 45



Same deal with cos/acos, and tan/atan. They have an ''a'' in front, because they are called arc-sine, arc-cosine, and arc-tangent.







Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS