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Devry & Westwood Game Programming Degrees


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#21 Runicode   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 12:45 AM

From what you've stated you've learned and assuming you completed the courses in the program I posted, you should be fine getting a programming job though. The westwood degree has much of what a CIS degree contains. Also, have you considered looking for simulation programming jobs?

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#22 Telastyn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3726

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 03:31 AM

Quote:
Original post by Runicode
I looked at Penn State and they have an online program, but the Bachelors looks VERY lacking.


Where were you looking? From what I see Penn State doesn't offer CS via their online program. "Information and Technology" or CIS degrees tend to be very light programming-wise since they're geared more towards sys-admins and DBAs.

Quote:

I am not sure what classes he was listing for, but I am a student at Westwood and can tell you I am in Calculus I and have II and III left after this, so for you to state I bet the physics classes don't include grounded calculus sound like a misinformed speculation.


Well that's good to hear. I'm used to seeing Newtonian physics and electricity/magnetism and basics circuits at the very least. Usually 2 more semesters after that. 1 semester of "Selected Topics in Physics" doesn't sound nearly as comprehensive or in depth. Since I expect the first 2 semesters of math is algebra and trig and Selected Topics in Physics is a freshman spring course, it follows that it's probably not going to involve a lot of calc.

That might be incorrect. Though I'm not sure how useful it is taking Newtonian physics later than the freshman year.

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doesn't mean that you shouldn't take computer programming because you don't remember how to do algebra, that in no way means you don't understand the concepts.


Really? It's not like calculus where there's a variety of integration rules based on the expression pattern. There's the process of moving terms to the other side of the equation by doing the opposite to both sides, there's factoring polynomials, and the quadratic equation. That's it; and you can look the quadratic equation up.

If you can't brush up on the stuff before the test and do well enough, I have to wonder if you really don't understand the concepts.

#23 wicked357   Members   -  Reputation: 1174

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 05:40 PM

Quote:
Original post by Telastyn
If you can't brush up on the stuff before the test and do well enough, I have to wonder if you really don't understand the concepts.


I guess you could do that, but I figured since it has been 10 years since I took an algebra class maybe it would be a good thing to take the class again, I could have brushed up on it and gone past that but that is the choice I took, it wouldn't be fair to say that I didn't understand the concepts enough to brush up on it and score better on my assessment, I didn't brush up at all, I'm going to school to learn and I didn't look at it the way you stated, not everyone does things the way you would, again not fair for your assumptions to be that someone didn't understand, because they did something out of the ordinary for yourself, is it? Anyways I am completely don't arguing math with you, it doesn't matter, I have my reasons you have yours, when I was in school I had 100% in algebra class it was easy, but 10 years is a long time has there been anything you learned 10 years ago that you forget because you didn't use it? I am sure there is!

Quote:
Original post by Runicode
From what you've stated you've learned and assuming you completed the courses in the program I posted, you should be fine getting a programming job though. The westwood degree has much of what a CIS degree contains. Also, have you considered looking for simulation programming jobs?


I know that gaming is out of the question because of the area, but I am doing research into programming companies altogether, one is Computers Unlimited, but I am still doing research into potential jobs for me of course I have 8 months or so before I have to come up with a plan for that.

#24 Runicode   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 02:51 AM

I wanted to share an update on my decision and thank everyone for their feedback. I'm planning on attending Nova Southeastern University starting March 13th for a Bachelors of Science with two minors, one in Computer Information Systems and another in Folklore & Mythology. Any thoughts on this curriculum? Based on all the feedback I believe this looks like the right path a combination of online classes and evening ground courses that work with my schedule. It'll take me about 3-4 years total with the credits I'm transfering in and all the cross listed courses that satisfy multiple requirements. Below are the courses I plan to take. Of course this may change as new courses are available...

General Education Requirements (30 credits)
...

Computer Science Major Requirements (54 credits)

Major Prerequisites (19 credits)
MATH 2100 Calculus I (4 credits)
MATH 2200 Calculus II (4 credits)
MATH 3020 Applied Statistics (3 credits)
PHYS 2400 Physics I/Lab (4 credits)
PHYS 2500 Physics II/Lab (4 credits)
Note: These courses may fulfill the General Education 6 credits of math/science requirements.

Core Courses (42 credits)
CSIS 1400 Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)
CSIS 1800 Introduction to Computer and Information Sciences (3 credits)
CSIS 1900 Computer Programming I (4 credits)
CSIS 2410 Assemblers and Assembly Language Programming (4 credits)
CSIS 2950 Computer Programming II (4 credits)
CSIS 3400 Data Structures (4 credits)
CSIS 3500 Networks and Data Communication (3 credits)
CSIS 3750 Software Engineering (4 credits)
CSIS 3810 Operating Systems Concepts (3 credits)
CSIS 4050 Computer Architecture (3 credits)
CSIS 4600 Systems Programming (4 credits)
CSIS 4610 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 credits)

Major Electives (12 credits)
CSIS 3530 Artificial Intelligence (3 credits)
CSIS 3610 Numerical Analysis (3 credits)
CSIS 4650 Computer Graphics (3 credits)
CSIS 4800 Introduction to Compilers and Interpreters (3 credits)

CIS Minor (17 credits)
CSIS 2000 Introduction to Database Systems (3 credits)
CSIS 3020 Web Programming and Design (3 credits)
CSIS 1900 Computer Programming I (4 credits) <Cross Listed>
CSIS 2950 Computer Programming II (4 credits) <Cross Listed>
CSIS 3500 Networks and Data Communication (3 credits) <Cross Listed>

Folklore & Mythology Minor (15 credits) <All Cross Listed>
HUMN 2350 Introduction to Folklore (3 credits)
ARTS 3300 Myth and Art (3 credits)
HUMN 4310 The Vampire (3 credits)
LITR 4510 King Arthur (3 credits)
HUMN 2400 Introduction to Celtic Studies (3 credits)

#25 Telastyn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3726

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 03:51 AM

A little skeptical that data structures don't show until year 3 and algorithms until year 4(?), but that seems okay. If you can, the main campus of these sort of schools tend to be of higher quality than their satellites.

#26 Runicode   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 04:00 AM

I will be attending the main campus in the evenings whenever possible. The only course work I plan on taking online will be general education and any courses that I can complete with my eyes closed...

#27 smc   Members   -  Reputation: 292

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 05:36 PM

A quick look at the university leads me to believe you made a good choice. It is highly unlikely Devry or Westwood will have premed programs any time soon. I am assuming this is a private college based on the tuition costs. It is pretty expensive.

My personal opinion is it's a little light on math. Not a deal breaker though. You can always learn on your own later, and this program should prepare you for that inevitability.

Is there a reason why you chose CIS over pure CS?


I hope you enjoy it. I think you chose a nice balance.

#28 Runicode   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 06:01 PM

Yes it is a private not for profit university and it turns out it's actually cheaper than most of the schools I have access to. Can you tell me what mathematics the curriculum is missing? I would like to at some point progress to a masters and I want to make sure my math is up to par. Also, I choose a Computer Science Major with a minor in Computer Information Systems... which is really only 2 additional courses, but I figured why not. Do you think the computer science curriculum is missing some staple CS course work that I should be looking for?

#29 daviangel   Members   -  Reputation: 600

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 04:39 PM

Quote:
Original post by Runicode
Yes it is a private not for profit university and it turns out it's actually cheaper than most of the schools I have access to. Can you tell me what mathematics the curriculum is missing? I would like to at some point progress to a masters and I want to make sure my math is up to par. Also, I choose a Computer Science Major with a minor in Computer Information Systems... which is really only 2 additional courses, but I figured why not. Do you think the computer science curriculum is missing some staple CS course work that I should be looking for?

Well, since I know SMC is also attending a California state school for his CS degree he probably meant "Linear Algebra" since it's mandatory for most schools now especially with the increased importance of graphics. All the other core CS courses seem to be there which usually includes several programming classes, and several computer architecture coures, data structures and algorithms.



#30 smc   Members   -  Reputation: 292

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 10:20 AM

Multivarite Calculus (Green and Stokes theorem etc...), Probability Theory and Linear Algebra. The Applied Statistics class may be Probability Theory, but somehow I doubt it.

The only reason I am such a stickler when it comes to math classes, is you can never have enough math. If you are planning on graduate school, then you are going to be reading research papers with math, math and more math. If you get a solid foundation in mathematics at the undergrad level, you will not have such an issue when you move into graduate study.

I usually recommend taking the mathematics degree equivalent of discrete structures. At my university it is titled Sets and Logic. Essentially it is basic set theory and proofs. Partial orders, equivalence classes, functions, maps, and countability. After cutting your teeth with this class, discrete structures is child's play. I never took discrete structures. When I needed it for Algorithm Analysis I purchased a used book for $5 at amazon and looked up the things that were unfamiliar (mainly modulus math definitions). Essentially this is the class all math majors have to take before taking any upper division math classes... This is the prerequisite for Real Analysis. It is also referred to as the weeder class by professors. Many students change their major after taking this class.

Rather then a minor in CIS, how about a minor in math. This would end up to be Calc III, Linear Algebra and maybe 1 or 2 more math class. This will benifit you in the long run much more then the two extra classes for a CIS. Really consider it.




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