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Develepmont system config of Gameboy Adv.


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#1 Sac   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 02 August 2001 - 02:47 AM

Hi , Can anyone tell me what is the ideal development system config for gameboy adv. and how to go about getting the sdk and developing for the same.... With regards, Sac

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#2 Obscure   Moderators   -  Reputation: 174

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Posted 03 August 2001 - 12:29 AM

To get the specs you need to register with Nintendo as an official AGB developer and buy the dev kit (approx $7000). You don''t get the specs unless you buy the official kit.

At the moment they are not approving new AGB developers (even professional developers) unless thay have a deal with a licensed Nintendo publisher.

Dan Marchant
Obscure Productions

#3 Hodglim   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 03 August 2001 - 09:35 AM

Hi there,

Obscure is correct when he says that to get an "official" development kit you will have to apply to Nintendo. However if you just want to get into GBA development as a hobbiest coder there are free compilers/resources available, here are a few to get you started!

http://www.gbadev.org
http://www.devrs.com/gba/
http://www.ukscene.org/sulph

GBA Development web ring...
http://nav.webring.yahoo.com/hub?ring=thegameboyadvanc

And a few tutorials to get you on your feet...
http://agbdev.net/thePERNproject/

You will also need a Flash Linker if you want to test your masterpieces out on hardware. You can pick one of these up frm Lik-Sang

Hope these help, have fun

- Hodglim
Homepage

Edited by - Hodglim on August 3, 2001 4:38:17 PM

#4 sulphur   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 03 August 2001 - 10:07 AM

Hello,

As mentioned before, there is no way to get your hands on the offical development kit unless, you get a job in the games industry doing Gameboy Advance development.

But you''re free to use public tools to develop homebrew software which will be a stepping stone to getting a job. This is the path I followed so its a proven way! There are plenty of jobs for GBA developers at the moment, publishers are crying out for titles to publish.

The GBA is a fairly straight forward handheld to develop for, theres plenty of information, demos, source as Hodglim pointed out.. although there are a lot of details that are scarce, ie. Sound. I recommend to you that you subscribe to the GBA dev mailing list, send an blank email to: gbadev-subscribe@yahoogroups.com. You may view the archives on http://www.yahoogroups.com/groups/gbadev.

You''ll also find 2 forums dedicated to GBA development which are linked on my site. The only thing to do now is download all this new found information you have and get coding!

If you wish to develop on linux, you''ll find arm/thumb gcc binaries on http://perso.wanadoo.fr/ben.lud/

If you wish to develop on win32, you have two choices: either arm/thumb gcc or the ARM SDT. You will find precompiled gcc binaries on http://www.devrs.com/gba/ and ARM SDT on http://www.gbadev.org.

Offical developers use GNUPro, which is a commerical version of gcc, so a lot of homebrewers tend to use that. Problem is, a lot of newbies tend to run into problems straight away. You need a correct crt0.s (startup code) and linker script else you''ll find into the same problems. Jason Wilkins has kindly put up a correct crt0/ldscript you may use which you''ll find at http://www.io.com/~fenix/devkitadv/ I believe he''s working on a complete set of tools for people new to the GBA.

The alternative is ARM SDT, which is a 30 day Evaluation package (although the crack is available -- but most people prefer to be legal) I''m not sure how well this compiler optimises code.. so I cannot comment.. but I''ve heard its far easier to use if you don''t want the hassles of link scripts. Especially if you dislike the syntax of gas (gcc assembler) :-)

The GBA has an ARM7TDMI cpu, so you ought to go download the technical manual from http://www.arm.com, this will help you understand the inner workings more, especially if you want to write assembler code!

http://www.agbdev.net/joat/docs/sdk.html is also a nice document if you want to learn about GBA specifics, and http://www.devrs.com/gba/files/gbadevfaqs.php will answer a lot of questions you may have, its a fantastic FAQ.

As quoted before and I''ll plug again, visit my site: http://www.ukscene.org/sulph for lots of links regarding coding on this great little system.

Have fun! :-)

Regards,
Peter.




--
http://www.ukscene.org/sulph

#5 mlambert   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 562

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Posted 03 August 2001 - 03:47 PM

Hi there,


The best way to break into the AGB scene is to either obtain the official dev tools by license, or to program a PC game that runs like a AGB game (I.e the right screen-res and color depth). Contrary to previous posts, developers can still gain an AGB license, however you do need to be part of a recognized company (i.e have published games before).

The AGB can be programmed with any enviroment you are willing to use, I use VC++.


Be warned that by using illegally gained tools will get you nowhere, publishers are not stupid and will check your background. I do not either agree with, nor disagree with these approaches, but I want to warn you of the risks....


My advice would be to use DirectX8 to create a nice 2D game with the AGB res, then try to get publishers interested. Build from there.



Overall, the AGB is a very nice piece of kit to use, more so than the PS1........whichever way you choose, have fun with it!




Marc Lambert

marc@darkhex.com

#6 Sac   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 03 August 2001 - 11:04 PM

HI Guys,

U guys are great .. thank u for giving me such a valuable info on my post... i will think what shall i do for it and go about it...

Once again thank u people.....


Regards,
Sac

#7 Bleakcabal   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 10 September 2001 - 02:45 PM

quote:
Original post by mlambert

Be warned that by using illegally gained tools will get you nowhere, publishers are not stupid and will check your background. I do not either agree with, nor disagree with these approaches, but I want to warn you of the risks....


My advice would be to use DirectX8 to create a nice 2D game with the AGB res, then try to get publishers interested. Build from there.





Does this mean that if someone would be to approach a potential devloper with a game working with the GCC compiler and an emulator would be turned down automaticly ? The GCC compiler isnt illegal, libs created by individuals with shouldn''t be illegal... I don''t know about presenting them a program on an emulator as a flash linker is probably illegal....

sulphur got a job or approached a publisher with work you did with stuff on the web, if so could you elaborate on this ( what did you use, in what form was it presented; on cartridge, a rom, code )

WHO DO THEY
THINK THEY''RE
FOOLING : YOU ?



GARAL website

#8 mlambert   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 562

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Posted 11 September 2001 - 07:13 AM

Hi BleakC,


I reffered to illegally gained tools, not tools and libs that are home written (which to my knowledge are not illegal).

Again, you should all know the risks of using these tools, but as it''s been pointed out before, you can accomplish programming for the AGB without being illegal. It''s really the choice of the individual.


Publishers will turn down your games if they even get a hint that they were created illegally, Nintendo would immediately sue and ban them from all future systems, if it was found out.


I''m not sure if the flash cartridges are considered illegal, I don''t think they are to be honest. So whether or not publishers would accept games in this manner, I''m also not sure of - however it would be expensive to send them out to a few publishers ;-)





Marc Lambert

marc@darkhex.com

#9 Bleakcabal   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 11 September 2001 - 08:56 AM

These are things I know aren''t illegal :

-GCC Compiler
-Libraries and documentation about using the GCC to program on an ARM processor.

These things, I do not know, I think they *could* be legal :

-Emulators ( as long as no games are provided, altough a grey area )
-Librairies designed expressivly for GBA programming ( Nintendo might not like these )

I think these are illegal

- Flash cartridges
- Flash Linkers

In any case, sending a game programmed with the GCC compiler to a publisher won''t do no good, unless you present an emulator with to run it, which are often considered undesirable to Nintendo. As most emulators claim, game ROMS are illegal, emulators aren''t. I do not know with certainty if they are tough.

Flash Cartridges might be legal. I once knew somone who worked on an homebrew Gameboy ( not color or advance ) title a long time ago using those and got the game published.

WHO DO THEY
THINK THEY''RE
FOOLING : YOU ?





#10 Arjan   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 29 September 2001 - 06:55 AM

If it isn''t legal, Nintendo could''ve shut down all major sites already. But I guess they don''t care that much, because the demo-scene actually helps, there''s a lot of talent out there.

#11 Beelzebub   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 30 September 2001 - 01:20 AM

quote:

Contrary to previous posts, developers can still gain an AGB license, however you do need to be part of a recognized company (i.e have published games before).



How do you do this? I've have developed games before (GBC and other platforms) but I'm not publisher. Does this mean you have to have a publisher before you can get hold of the hardware?

Even the SN Systems kit (which is only $5000) requires you to be a registered developer before the software installs - the install program looks for something from NOA on your harddisk before it starts.

I've looked at the offical www.noa.com website and that says flat no more registrations, no contact email/phone number. Do you have a back door please?

Edited by - Beelzebub on September 30, 2001 8:30:16 AM

#12 mlambert   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 562

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Posted 01 October 2001 - 08:37 AM

quote:
How do you do this? I''ve have developed games before (GBC and other platforms) but I''m not publisher. Does this mean you have to have a publisher before you can get hold of the hardware?


Not necessarily. If you have developed games before, which have been published, then they may be willing to talk to you. You will need to have a strong gameplan and possibly a business plan too.


quote:
Even the SN Systems kit (which is only $5000) requires you to be a registered developer before the software installs - the install program looks for something from NOA on your harddisk before it starts.


It looks for the AGB development console to be connected.


quote:
I''ve looked at the offical www.noa.com website and that says flat no more registrations, no contact email/phone number. Do you have a back door please?


As of now, I believe that they aren''t taking any more developers direct. You may still get licensed through a publisher, but I''m not sure. This is because the amount of developers they now have and the way their quality control works.


Your best bet is to try to get a publisher interested (make a PC game in the same res, with the same colours as a GBA) and go from there.



Good luck!



Marc.



Marc Lambert

marc@darkhex.com




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