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open GL , Direct X or Glide


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#1 Zenshai   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 16 August 2001 - 05:30 AM

I am new in prigramming(C 1 Month)and I want to learn more so I can make my own game(I dream that it will be a 3d game).Please tell me what should I learn????Open GL , Direct X or Glide and why?Please I know it`s too soon to strt with this but I think that if I have the right direction I will evolve to a better programming level more quikly.I want to thank everyone for reading this replying or not. Thank you for spending some of your time I know it`s valuable.

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#2 evaclear   Members   -  Reputation: 162

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Posted 16 August 2001 - 07:14 AM

Have you kept your eye on the computer industry lately? Things move at a rapid pace. Video cards tripple speeds ever 6 months. The same goes for software. It''s hard to say what API''s will and won''t be around by the time you gain enough knowledge to use them.

Though I''m sure the OpenGL and DirectX die hards will argue that point with me until I''m in the grave.

Application Programming Interfaces such as OpenGL or DirectX are just an extension of your own knowledge, in specific areas. For instance if you know matrix math, and quaternion math...implementing movement in 3d is a breeze with either API. So my suggestion is to learn the math, programming and theory behind the API''s. This way when it comes time for you to learn one, it won''t be as difficult of a transition.

#3 terminate   Members   -  Reputation: 259

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Posted 16 August 2001 - 04:37 PM

Either DirectX or OpenGL. Check < href = "nehe.gamedev.net">NeHe for examples of OpenGL and NeXe for examples of Direct3d stuff. Then pick the one that looks better to you. Glide is dead forget about it.

#4 Zenshai   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 17 August 2001 - 03:17 AM

Thank you both.You have been very helpful.

EOF

#5 Kylotan   Moderators   -  Reputation: 3338

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Posted 18 August 2001 - 11:48 AM

Btw, the Glide API has been dead for a couple of years now, really. That is why the others recommended OpenGL and Direct3D.

#6 Outworlder   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 18 August 2001 - 12:25 PM

GLIDE is dead. R.I.P.

As are all Voodoo cards. If you''re going for 3D develompment, you should have a decent card. Not only because your early code will not be optimized, but you can''t really program in OpenGL or Direct3D without hardware accelleration.

Gaiomard Dragon
-===(UDIC)===-

#7 Drizzt DoUrden   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 21 August 2001 - 11:56 AM

all right, let me say this: If you want to make 2D game use Direct X. You can do it in OpenGL but its alot harder, and less indirect.
If your developing for more than one OS, then OpenGL is better.
Also, there are alot more books and tutorials for Direct X. Keven and Dave(members of the GDNet staff) were the only people to ever publish a GOOD openGL game programming book. NeHe are the onyl good openGL tutorials around.
Basically, OpenGL is better, but when it comes to 2D its harder.

If you dont know any windows programming, you need to learn it first.
www.winprog.org
Good Luck.

"I''''ve sparred with creatures from the nine hells themselves... I barely plan on breaking a sweat here, today."~Drizzt Do''''Urden

#8 Zenshai   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 23 August 2001 - 12:14 PM

I want to thank the rest of you for replying .

Thank you very much for your really really valuable info.

Thanks again.






#9 gph-gw   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 23 August 2001 - 12:31 PM

quote:
Original post by Drizzt DoUrden
all right, let me say this: If you want to make 2D game use Direct X. You can do it in OpenGL but its alot harder, and less indirect.
If your developing for more than one OS, then OpenGL is better.
Also, there are alot more books and tutorials for Direct X. Keven and Dave(members of the GDNet staff) were the only people to ever publish a GOOD openGL game programming book. NeHe are the onyl good openGL tutorials around.
Basically, OpenGL is better, but when it comes to 2D its harder.

If you dont know any windows programming, you need to learn it first.
www.winprog.org
Good Luck.

"I''ve sparred with creatures from the nine hells themselves... I barely plan on breaking a sweat here, today."~Drizzt Do''Urden


A lot more DX books? Only because Direct3D is needlessly complex and poorly documented by Microsoft. All you need to get going on a basic 3D Opengl game is in NeHe. I needed several web sites, a book, and a good amount of frustration before getting DirectX working at all. OpenGL worked the first time.

Besides, since Zenshai is new and writes c code, OpenGL might be easier because in order to use DirectX you have to learn C++.

Even though I use Windows programming, you can use GLUT in place of Windows code to make things easier.

And if you use DirectX 8 for 2D OpenGL''s not so much harder.

Oh, and don''t expect to be able to make something like Quake III your first game.


#10 Hull   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 24 August 2001 - 11:19 AM

I can tell you what the hardcode industry thinks about choosing an API for graphics.

If you want to produce perfect games in very little time and keep control of it all at the same time. Use OpenGL.
As a bonus you will also get portability and nice remarks from fellow coders. OpenGL coders are generally percieved as ''smart''.
There are excellent forums and documentation that will help you in your quest at www.opengl.org

If you want to help Microsoft and maybe gain some marketing help when selling a game. You should choose D3D (part of DX).
As a bonus you loose portability (which kills other OS) and gain looooooong nights and days of coding(fun) and learning, just to get the initial D3D window to pop up saying "Hello world".

There is actually one much harder and more divine ''API'' to choose. Pure software.
As a bonus you will become the Elite of the elite in coding and will, if you succeed in producing a good game, be honored like the God you are. Although this solution is NOT a way to make money or good games fast.

My advice is: Choose OpenGL first. Its the easiest API to learn.



The Game Industry

#11 evaclear   Members   -  Reputation: 162

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Posted 24 August 2001 - 02:15 PM

Restricting yourself to a single API is foolish. This foolishness can be avoided by designing your engine properly so that you don''t need to choose one api over the other. Everything is abstracted at a lower level, so that all you need to do is create a .dll file or similar to allow the engine to switch between API''s. Obviously this is a bit to advanced for "learning" purposes. Which is why I said to learn 3d theory, and work on your engineering skills. You should be able to easily implement such a design once you know the 3d math, and have the engineering skills that make it possible.

And the rest of the "help microsoft" "save linux", "cross platform" talk...is just talk. With a good engine design cross platform capabilities are as easy as pie. And as for helping microsoft? Well come on now...I suppose you thought about "helping microsoft" when you installed the windows OS, or DOS, or Office, or when you bought an Intellimouse, or a MS keyboard, or an MS Joystick. You can hate them all you want, but designing a few apps to use directX will not help or harm them in the least.

Final words. Like I said before, learn the theory. Then if you want to learn a specific api you can easily figure it out in a short ammount of time. And perhaps by then you''ll also have a better idea which API suits you best. If you want to make a game...well I highly suggest you spend along time designing the engine so that it can support any API or extension that may come out. This way you won''t have to totaly re-write the engine every time a new video card/API/Extension comes into play.




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