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[java] Java overtaking C in game development?


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#21 menyo   Members   -  Reputation: 367

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 01:36 AM

Lol,

I just started to understand java, had my first experience with running static animations fullscreen. Didn't took me that long to understand though :D.

Anyway, i will download visual studio express and XNA and start on C. Are there any recommended video tutorials on this? I like vid tutorials to get familiar with the language and you MUST rewrite the code instead of copy/paste. I can look for them myself but i'm at work and most sites are blocked (surprised this one works :D). And there must be a favorite tutorial series right? Any books you guys recommand?

Sponsor:

#22 rip-off   Moderators   -  Reputation: 6876

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 02:39 AM

Quote:

With the C language i ment C in general, i did't know they where that different from eachother.

They are considerably different from each other, but they share their syntactic roots in C. An analogy might be how the different European languages are based on Latin. To say "C in general" doesn't really have meaning in the context of these languages.

C# + XNA does not cost money - unless you want to deploy on the XBox. You are free to develop using a PC.

Other than that I would say that your attitude seems good, that will count for more than your choice of language.

Quote:

I'm not sure about the legality of releasing commercial works compiled with the express edition of VS, but in any case you don't generally go from not knowing how to program at all to releasing the next MW2 so quickly that at some point in time you couldn't afford to upgrade to professional edition somewhere in between.

Its perfectly legal. Microsoft want developers to write cool programs for their platforms. The professional edition just has more features, really.

#23 menyo   Members   -  Reputation: 367

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 03:47 AM

Downloading VS express and XNA now... i guess this threat isn't in the relative topic anymore. I'll just let it die and create a new one as soon as i am in need of more guidence by you guys.

Thanks a lot for sending me on the right path. And i actually do like the feeling of knowing the basics of Java!

#24 Deranged   Members   -  Reputation: 594

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 04:10 AM

Quote:
Original post by menyo
Downloading VS express and XNA now... i guess this threat isn't in the relative topic anymore. I'll just let it die and create a new one as soon as i am in need of more guidence by you guys.

Thanks a lot for sending me on the right path. And i actually do like the feeling of knowing the basics of Java!


As well you should. Starting off it's actually a pretty good idea to see what a lot of the major choices in languages have in common with eachother. It helps with learning general programming theory. Just make sure that while you're learning you really try to learn each tool you use as in depth as you possibly can. Try to look at ways to solve the same problem programatically from many different angles, also.

Good luck again!
Regards,
Sheridan Bulger
-Day Job | Software Developer | Deacom, Inc.
-Moonlighting | President (lead) | Nonpareil Studios, LLC.

#25 poonoon   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 09:16 PM

Most of mobile phones that is made todays , are equiped with Java ME . If you learn Java , you can sold your Java games to about 4 milliard mobile phone users . It is a very good market . There are many books that teaches Java . But if you are a self thouth programmer , I suggest Deitel book .
Java How to Program by Deitel from Prentice Hall

But if you want to develop games for PCs and consoles , I suggest C++

C is old and is good for virus programming and compiler and OS programming
C# is a very bad choice and only has a very huge prpaganda from Microsoft .

#26 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5469

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Posted 01 April 2011 - 04:07 AM

Wow, lotsa comments.

I have been running trough the java tutorials from thenewboston (a guy from youtube). So as i have read it's wise to continue learning java as i can always learn C, C++ or C# afterwards. With the C language i ment C in general, i did't know they where that different from eachother.


C# has alot more in common with Java than it has with C really so yes, they are quite different, all four languages (C, C++, C# and Java) have similar syntax though.

This for example is valid code in all 4 languages, With C# and Java the function has to belong to a class, with C++ its optional and in C it can't (C doesn't support classes)
int coolfunction(int x, int y) {
return x*y;
}

classes are effectivly created the same way in C# and Java

public class MyClass {
	private int variable;
	public void fun(int x) {
    	variable+=x;
	}
	public MyClass() {
    	variable=0;
	}
}

in c++ its normally done like this

//Myclass.h

class MyClass {
private: 
	int variable;
public:
	void fun(int x);
	MyClass();
}

//Myclass.cpp

void MyClass::fun(int x) {
	variable+=x;
}
MyClass::MyClass() {
	variable=0;
}

I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#27 Danny02   Members   -  Reputation: 275

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 06:57 AM

AFAIK Android doesn't really use Java, it uses Dalvik. This is the reason Google was sued by Oracle.



AFAIK Android do use Java.

The thing is that Google developed his own Java Virtual Machine, was is also perfectly legal, what Oracle is sueing for is that the say Google break some Copyrights in their Standart libarys and perhaps some licening and patent sutff in the Dalvik VM.

See for example the opensource Java VM open JDK, which is actually supported by Oracle.



#28 LizardGamer   Members   -  Reputation: 98

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 06:00 AM

current-gen consoles don't even support it.


Well thats sort'a wrong as I know the Xbox 360 has java support and I think the PS3 may have it

#29 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 24059

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 06:34 AM

[citation needed]


...why on earth was this thread bumped anyway?

#30 Bregma   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4361

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 06:37 AM

2003 just called and it wants its future back.
Stephen M. Webb
Professional Free Software Developer

#31 XXChester   Members   -  Reputation: 699

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 06:50 AM

3) Limited to microsoft platforms.


Lies....look at the ExEn project. It runs C#/XNA games on I Phone/Pad/Touch, silverlight and is working on an an OSX and android versions.

Remember to mark someones post as helpful if you found it so.

http://www.BrandonMcCulligh.ca


#32 J-dog   Members   -  Reputation: 120

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 01:26 AM

Some good replies already on here... but just to give you some overview of the languages in question, maybe a slightly different perspective...

C - You don't want go near C. As has been mentioned, it is very low-level and is an old language.. were you doing OS development, it would be a different story but as it stands, C is really the wrong tool for the job when it comes to developing games. Unless you hate yourself or want a challenge of that sort, or something. :)

C++ - While this is still the most widely-used language in game development, and enjoys an almost elite status as a language, I feel the need to point out what has not been mentioned here yet: C++ is kind of messy. It was designed in the 80s as C with support for object orientation, and was also intended to be backwards compatible with C from the offset. This is a reason for it's popularity, but is also a reason for a very cluttered design - it's not that C++ is bad, but it has lots of mechanics and features which lots of people don't ever use - and are quite frankly unnecessary. The fact that the language is multi-paradigm (imperative with a strange sort of object orientation which isn't 100% what OOP should be) can also be potentially confusing.

Please understand that I'm not saying C++ is a bad language - it is not - but of all these languages, it has the most cluttered design, and is potentially the most difficult. The major thing that sets it apart from java and C# is that in C++, you have to handle your memory manually. You must keep tabs on everything you create and delete it at the correct time, as well as dealing with references to memory - if you mess that sort of thing up (which is very easy to do), the resultant errors are disasterous. But on the other side of the coin, memory management gives you a fantastic level of control and when done right is quite elegant. See, Java and C# still carry out the same sort of memory management tasks, except they're handled implicitly - in those cases it's still important to be aware of what it's actually doing.

Java - contrary to what other people say, Java is, I feel, rather similar to C++. They are not totally different animals, but have some important differences and do at times require different practices. Java was created with portability in mind - since it runs off a virtual machine, you can run it off anything... as long as the platform decides to support it. Which is not the case with consoles :( . Still, java is a cleaner, sometimes more elegant language than C++, and it incorporates a more elegant object orientation model, but it still has it's own pitfalls. It's a generally easier language though, and this is mainly thanks to lack of memory management.

C# - this was designed with lessons learnt from both java and C++. Again ,it's actually not that dissimilar (it's not like comparing Fortran, smalltalk, Lisp, etc.... C++, java and C# all fall under the same family), and I feel that C# has the most elegant design of all these languages. It discards unnecessary elements of C++ and redefines some elements to make more use out of hem. Note that C# is a new language in most respects, and does not share the relationship that C and C++ share - it is a new design effort without backwards compatibility in mind. So the naming is a little confusing. :) Overall, a great language, but very much rooted in microsoft , if that bothers you.

Whew...sorry... bit of a long post. Bottom line is: stay away from C, and between the other 3 languages mentioned here, I'd say C++ is a bad one to start with. You'll learn much more comfortably with C# and Java, and the transition to C++ is not too difficult to make once you learn the others! That is, if you choose to. They all have great API's backing them, it's simply a choice of which you like best and what exactly you aim to do. You can make a great game in any of these. And have fun! :)

#33 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 24059

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 06:35 AM

Has anyone really been far as decided to use even go want to do look more like?

#34 braindigitalis   Members   -  Reputation: 150

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 06:57 AM

@Deranged, There are no limitations on commercial use of the express editions of visual studio 2010 express. However, if you want to release your XNA game on xbox or windows phone 7 (not PC) then you have to pay an annual subscription fee to microsoft in a similar way to how you would pay a subscription to apple to be able to upload apps to the appstore. Once a game is on the xbox, as part of your terms and conditions you MUST provide a trial version that is free and a non-trial version which you must charge for. Therefore, if they were to have a no-commercial-use clause in the visual studio license this would conflict with their terms and conditions for XBOX Live Indie Games.

I am confident enough on this to use it at work, too.

Older versions that were trial versions used to put popup messages into the code iirc and watermark them as built with the trial version, since version 2005 at least, when it became completely free, they do not.

Microsoft's rationale behind this is to encourage uptake of windows by developers. More developers means more quality software and a bigger market share for MS.

#35 Don Carnage   Members   -  Reputation: 608

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 07:01 AM

^^ this.

You only have to register VC express ed., then it's free to use for building commercial apps:

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/Vsexpressvc/thread/3030a179-f7be-4f40-84ff-debd6d290b2c
It is I, the spectaculous Don Karnage! My bloodthirsty horde is on an intercept course with you. We will be shooting you and looting you in precisely... Ten minutes. Felicitations!

#36 Blithweevile   Members   -  Reputation: 96

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Posted 12 July 2011 - 02:57 PM

I know this thread is a bit old, but last I heard, Microsoft was discontinuing support for C#. I don't don't know C#, I'm a java person, but I don't think C# is such a good language to learn anymore. If Microsoft is discontinuing support, then it's probably on the decline. I'd say python or java to start out. Java was my first language, and as long as you're driven, it isn't too hard to learn.

#37 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5469

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Posted 12 July 2011 - 03:33 PM

I know this thread is a bit old, but last I heard, Microsoft was discontinuing support for C#. I don't don't know C#, I'm a java person, but I don't think C# is such a good language to learn anymore. If Microsoft is discontinuing support, then it's probably on the decline. I'd say python or java to start out. Java was my first language, and as long as you're driven, it isn't too hard to learn.


What ? since when ?
you got any source for that ?

C# is under active development and is the only supported language for WP7 (Which Microsoft is pushing quite hard to try to get a share of the rapidly growing smartphone market).

Its possible that they are ending support for the earlier versions but thats normal. (The latest version of the C# language is 4.0 which was released in april last year and 5.0 is on its way)
I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#38 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 24059

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Posted 12 July 2011 - 06:33 PM

I heard that IBM were phasing out computers in favor of abacus development. Probably not much point learning computers now.

#39 The_Neverending_Loop   Members   -  Reputation: 566

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 12:41 PM

I heard that IBM were phasing out computers in favor of abacus development. Probably not much point learning computers now.


And they called me mad when they saw me with my abacus... HA! whos laughign now! *Moves one bead to the left representing my victory vs the nay-sayers*




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