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#21 BeanDog   Members   -  Reputation: 1063

Posted 12 January 2011 - 05:59 AM


I feel old because I had an A: and a B: drive. And I approve of every post in this thread.


Luxury. We could only dream of having letters for our drives. Or colons. We did a LOAD "",8 and we were grateful for it.


This.

~BenDilts( void );

Lucidchart: Online Flow Chart Software; Lucidpress: Digital Publishing Software


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#22 Bregma   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5133

Posted 12 January 2011 - 08:31 AM

No, guys, old is trying to describe punched cards to cow orkers when regaling them with tails of your undergrad days.
Young is knowing how to use the nibbler to get twice the storage out of your 5.25" floppies. Posted Image
Stephen M. Webb
Professional Free Software Developer

#23 Tachikoma   Members   -  Reputation: 552

Posted 12 January 2011 - 10:56 AM

Young is knowing how to use the nibbler to get twice the storage out of your 5.25" floppies.

Yep the similar trick worked for the 3.5". I just used a very sharp drill bit.


I still have a bunch of floppy drives lying around. And floppy disks of different physical sizes. One of the reasons I have them is because they were one of the most reliable ways of flashing firmware to DVD drives, and motherboards.
Latest project: Sideways Racing on the iPad

#24 misi   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 12 January 2011 - 01:51 PM

Remember the times when floppy drive was a luxury and you would be the cool kid if you had one? Everybody else was spinning cassettes and praying that the program/game will load successfully this time (it often took a few minutes without Turbo)...

Geez, I feel like Methuselah now...

#25 Cygnus_X   Members   -  Reputation: 359

Posted 12 January 2011 - 02:54 PM

Remember the times when floppy drive was a luxury and you would be the cool kid if you had one? Everybody else was spinning cassettes and praying that the program/game will load successfully this time (it often took a few minutes without Turbo)...

Geez, I feel like Methuselah now...


I remember the days when if you had 2 5.25 floppy drives, it meant you could read AND write at the same time. Mind = Blown.

#26 jwezorek   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1856

Posted 12 January 2011 - 07:48 PM

Remember how loud 5.25 drives used to be? Man, that's a sound I haven't heard in a while...

#27 Aardvajk   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5981

Posted 12 January 2011 - 08:13 PM

Floppies were extremely high tech and very reliable medium to those of us who had to plug a separately bought cassette player into our Spectrums.

I felt most old when my ex-girlfriend refused to believe that I could remember the days before anyone had VHS Video Recorders in their house.

Pfft. Floppies are new-fangled to me.

#28 dwarfsoft   Moderators   -  Reputation: 1214

Posted 12 January 2011 - 08:18 PM

Well, feeling all nostalgic I found this in the Data Centre today. The 5.25 Diskettes include one labelled "Y2K Code" and another dated '93. :P

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#29 Demosthenes   Members   -  Reputation: 985

Posted 13 January 2011 - 09:31 AM

I remember having games than spanned more than ten 1.44 diskettes and failing the installation because one of the diskettes was faulty...

I'm pre-historic.

#30 way2lazy2care   Members   -  Reputation: 782

Posted 13 January 2011 - 12:56 PM

Posted Image

oh god did I lol. At first I just thought it was cute, but then I read the screen and now people are looking at me funny.

Us talking about floppy disks must be like when the bearded ones talk about punchcards et al, zomg.

My uncle doesn't have a beard :[

#31 MSW   Members   -  Reputation: 151

Posted 13 January 2011 - 05:02 PM

Heh, I remember when "publishing a computer game"...ment the source code had been published in a periodical :blink:

My deviantART: http://msw.deviantart.com/


#32 BeanDog   Members   -  Reputation: 1063

Posted 13 January 2011 - 05:10 PM

Heh, I remember when "publishing a computer game"...ment the source code had been published in a periodical :blink:

Yeah, we used to get Compute magazine, and I spent hours typing in the compiled programs (hex) into the Commodore by hand. I tried to convince my parents to upgrade to the Compute edition that came with a disk, but no luck.

~BenDilts( void );

Lucidchart: Online Flow Chart Software; Lucidpress: Digital Publishing Software


#33 Lode   Members   -  Reputation: 982

Posted 13 January 2011 - 05:37 PM

You mean what the DOS names A: and B: are used for?

#34 NewBreed   Members   -  Reputation: 263

Posted 13 January 2011 - 08:05 PM

I'm 25 but after seeing that I feel as though I'm half way to old age... Slightly depressed now...

#35 Rixter   Members   -  Reputation: 785

Posted 14 January 2011 - 12:46 AM

Heh, I still make sure to have a working computer around with a 3.5" and a 5.25" drive. I still have a bunch of old disks laying around that might have something important on them, you don't know!

I remember back in the 80's my Dad was doing some sort of shareware business, so he had my Mom and us kids formatting 5.25" disks like all the time. Format one side. Flip it over and format the other...

#36 MrDaaark   Members   -  Reputation: 3555

Posted 14 January 2011 - 08:41 AM

Also I don't know about your guys but I didn't hear about a zip drive until like the beginning of university when I got a job and found a zip drive reader in the back of a utility closet. "What is this piece of archaic technology?" My boss: "You see this was a form of data storage like the floppy disk. The university never really supported them. It could store a few 100 MB..." Apparently they never caught on in my high school since I never saw them.

In the late 90s there was a bunch of competing, higher storage, floppy disk format replacements and none of them ever caught on. I remember one was called the Jaz drive.

#37 way2lazy2care   Members   -  Reputation: 782

Posted 14 January 2011 - 08:55 AM

I'm 25 but after seeing that I feel as though I'm half way to old age... Slightly depressed now...

I'm 23 and I feel similarly. Of course if I never messed up my registry so it no longer recognized thumb drives I never would have known the A/B other than an educated guess on what other types of drives have existed in computers.


Also I don't know about your guys but I didn't hear about a zip drive until like the beginning of university when I got a job and found a zip drive reader in the back of a utility closet. "What is this piece of archaic technology?" My boss: "You see this was a form of data storage like the floppy disk. The university never really supported them. It could store a few 100 MB..." Apparently they never caught on in my high school since I never saw them.

In the late 90s there was a bunch of competing, higher storage, floppy disk format replacements and none of them ever caught on. I remember one was called the Jaz drive.

I still have an old zip disk drive somewhere in one of the boxes of forgotten technology I share with my paw. Probably sitting next to Merlin.

/nostalgic for my wasted youth

#38 DaveMS   Members   -  Reputation: 185

Posted 14 January 2011 - 04:37 PM

I remeber having games on cassette. Took about 30 minutes to load one up, if all went well, although they all usually fail a few minutes from the end. I'm sure in my young days I spent more time loading games than playing them. I'm only 26, it's amazing how things have come on.

I wonder how technology will have changed in another 20 years?



#39 Moe   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1248

Posted 14 January 2011 - 05:58 PM


I'm 25 but after seeing that I feel as though I'm half way to old age... Slightly depressed now...

I'm 23 and I feel similarly. Of course if I never messed up my registry so it no longer recognized thumb drives I never would have known the A/B other than an educated guess on what other types of drives have existed in computers.


Also I don't know about your guys but I didn't hear about a zip drive until like the beginning of university when I got a job and found a zip drive reader in the back of a utility closet. "What is this piece of archaic technology?" My boss: "You see this was a form of data storage like the floppy disk. The university never really supported them. It could store a few 100 MB..." Apparently they never caught on in my high school since I never saw them.

In the late 90s there was a bunch of competing, higher storage, floppy disk format replacements and none of them ever caught on. I remember one was called the Jaz drive.

I still have an old zip disk drive somewhere in one of the boxes of forgotten technology I share with my paw. Probably sitting next to Merlin.

/nostalgic for my wasted youth

I thought the Jazz drives were 2 GB tape drives or something like that and the regular zip disks were 100 MB or so? I do remember there being an LS-120 drive that could take regular floppies or special floppies that could store 120 MB.

Man, I'm so glad we are beyond those days. I remember trying to store bitmaps and wave files on disks. You'd be hard pressed to fit anything at all on them.



#40 Rixter   Members   -  Reputation: 785

Posted 15 January 2011 - 12:31 AM



I'm 25 but after seeing that I feel as though I'm half way to old age... Slightly depressed now...

I'm 23 and I feel similarly. Of course if I never messed up my registry so it no longer recognized thumb drives I never would have known the A/B other than an educated guess on what other types of drives have existed in computers.


Also I don't know about your guys but I didn't hear about a zip drive until like the beginning of university when I got a job and found a zip drive reader in the back of a utility closet. "What is this piece of archaic technology?" My boss: "You see this was a form of data storage like the floppy disk. The university never really supported them. It could store a few 100 MB..." Apparently they never caught on in my high school since I never saw them.

In the late 90s there was a bunch of competing, higher storage, floppy disk format replacements and none of them ever caught on. I remember one was called the Jaz drive.

I still have an old zip disk drive somewhere in one of the boxes of forgotten technology I share with my paw. Probably sitting next to Merlin.

/nostalgic for my wasted youth

I thought the Jazz drives were 2 GB tape drives or something like that and the regular zip disks were 100 MB or so? I do remember there being an LS-120 drive that could take regular floppies or special floppies that could store 120 MB.

Man, I'm so glad we are beyond those days. I remember trying to store bitmaps and wave files on disks. You'd be hard pressed to fit anything at all on them.



I think there were both 1GB and 2GB Jaz drives, but I don't think they were tape. Tape drives were something else, I don't know how much the held, but that's what my Dad use to use in the early 90's to backup our computer. I do remember hearing something about super floppy disks, but I don't think that went anywhere.




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