Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

What tools do you use to design a game?


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
21 replies to this topic

#1 bdragoncat   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 14 January 2011 - 02:25 PM

Hi guys ,

I'm just wondering about what tools do you use (or Suggest) for making a game?

I'm using Dev-C++ and SDL Library making some games for fun. It may not so
professional but they are free.

How about you?

https://sites.google.com/site/xrobot17/project-1


Posted Image

Sponsor:

#2 Daivuk   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 376

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 14 January 2011 - 02:52 PM

I use visual Studio express C# and C++. They are both free and are the best IDE I know of (That might be a personal opinion tho).

For art tools, I have expensive tastes :)

#3 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10177

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 14 January 2011 - 03:44 PM

Despite its title, the topic is not about game design. Moved to For Beginners.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#4 yckx   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1291

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 14 January 2011 - 03:58 PM

Avoid Dev-C++. Microsoft's Visual Studio Express is good. So is Code::Blocks. The first link also mentions a couple others that I haven't tried.

#5 Shonumi   Members   -  Reputation: 148

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 14 January 2011 - 04:07 PM

I too use C++ and SDL; it's great for both 2D and 3D work with OpenGL. I haven't used an IDE in ages though. I run Linux mostly, so I just use Leafpad (a simple text editor) and a script that compiles everything I need using g++. The family computer runs Windows, and I haven't ever gotten around to switching to Code::Blocks, so just use Dev-C++ to see how my code runs on that platform. Once I finally get serious about releasing my project, I'm going to update though. Not too much love here for Dev-C++ as it's not particularly an up-to-date IDE.

For art, I use GIMP and Inkscape. Both are cross-platform and include enough tools to fiddle around with. I prefer GIMP mostly for sprite work whereas I use Inkscape to create detailed, smooth 2D graphics that get rasterized into my game. I have Photoshop on the family computer, but that's far too much beyond my humble needs.

Music is by far the most complicated; it requires several programs just to get anywhere and sound decent. Most of my programs are Linux specific, but here's just my most commonly used ones: QjackCtl, Qsynth (and simultaneously FluidSynth), Hydrogen, Rosegarden, amsynth, and Audacity. Let's not forget the heaps of soundfonts sitting around.

#6 Captain P   Members   -  Reputation: 1092

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 14 January 2011 - 06:31 PM

I see no need to use a heavy-duty language when I can use a nimble one instead, so at home I mostly use Python and Pygame. Notepad++ and Idle for writing code, Paint.NET for creating images and pen and paper to work out (game-)design issues.
Create-ivity - a game development blog Mouseover for more information.

#7 bdragoncat   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 15 January 2011 - 02:01 AM

Thanks for the advices.
I also heard about and downloaded a Microsoft's Visual Studio Express before.
But never got chance to use that.
I think this is a good time to move on now :)


#8 Jarwulf   Members   -  Reputation: 222

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 15 January 2011 - 02:05 AM

Avoid Dev-C++. Microsoft's Visual Studio Express is good. So is Code::Blocks. The first link also mentions a couple others that I haven't tried.


Is there some sort of evil fairy which tricks all new game programmers into using Dev C++?

#9 Servant of the Lord   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 21183

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 15 January 2011 - 02:39 AM

I like QtCreator to program in, and I like Qt itself. I also use SFML, but SDL is pretty nice too.

Is there some sort of evil fairy which tricks all new game programmers into using Dev C++?

When I first started programming, the C++ book I purchased came with Dev C++ on a companion disc (C++ for Dummies, I think it was). I used it for the first 3 or 4 years of development, and I got so familiar with it, that changing to another IDE was scary. Posted Image

I tried Code::Blocks, and seemed like a decent alternative, but Visual Studio had so many interface buttons that I just uninstalled it and crawled back into my shell. Eventually, I upgraded from Dev C++ to just using MinGW directly via the command prompt, and then moved to Programmer's Notepad. Now I use QtCreator, even for non-QT stuff.
It's perfectly fine to abbreviate my username to 'Servant' rather than copy+pasting it all the time.
All glory be to the Man at the right hand... On David's throne the King will reign, and the Government will rest upon His shoulders. All the earth will see the salvation of God.
Of Stranger Flames - [indie turn-based rpg set in a para-historical French colony] | Indie RPG development journal

[Fly with me on Twitter] [Google+] [My broken website]

[Need web hosting? I personally like A Small Orange]


#10 JSelf   Members   -  Reputation: 102

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 15 January 2011 - 02:56 AM


Avoid Dev-C++. Microsoft's Visual Studio Express is good. So is Code::Blocks. The first link also mentions a couple others that I haven't tried.


Is there some sort of evil fairy which tricks all new game programmers into using Dev C++?



College

#11 Metz   Members   -  Reputation: 201

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 15 January 2011 - 04:47 AM

The course I'm taking was nice and shipped me a free CD of VS 2008 (pretty sure it's the Express version).

I'm on a mac though so I went with Xcode anyway hahaha ;D

#12 kilah   Members   -  Reputation: 513

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 15 January 2011 - 05:12 AM

Visual studio express is more than enought to create pretty much anything you need. There are lots of useful tools you should look at after you feel comfortable,one I strongly reommend is CMake and their other support tools, easen the burden . But first, get used to VS Express (Code::Blocks is good too, but I strongly recommend VS).

SDL, SFML, or other multipurpose tools are good enough to start with. DirectX or OpenGL is only needed if you want to do some 3D stuff, yet I would recommend you to master 2D first.

#13 bdragoncat   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 16 January 2011 - 04:43 PM


Avoid Dev-C++. Microsoft's Visual Studio Express is good. So is Code::Blocks. The first link also mentions a couple others that I haven't tried.


Is there some sort of evil fairy which tricks all new game programmers into using Dev C++?


That's a good view point......
The first time I use Dev-C++ because its compact size 4.9mb , and easy to use.
Its not for professional , so you can get into it pretty soon. Just like you may enjoy
a small and fast handy tool rather than a big and complete , but complicate and slow
one.

But anyway , I will move into VS Express :)

#14 bdragoncat   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 16 January 2011 - 04:47 PM

Visual studio express is more than enought to create pretty much anything you need. There are lots of useful tools you should look at after you feel comfortable,one I strongly reommend is CMake and their other support tools, easen the burden . But first, get used to VS Express (Code::Blocks is good too, but I strongly recommend VS).

SDL, SFML, or other multipurpose tools are good enough to start with. DirectX or OpenGL is only needed if you want to do some 3D stuff, yet I would recommend you to master 2D first.


You're right. After I tried SDL , I feel DirectX or OpenGL is hard to get into it.

#15 Sothh   Members   -  Reputation: 102

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 16 January 2011 - 06:00 PM

Python, for the language. PyScripter, for the IDE. Panda3d, for the game engine. Photoshop for image editing. Blender for 3d modeling.
If you had my mind, you could rule the world...

Buy and sell 3d models:

The 3d Studio

My website:
Immortal Gaming

Proud to be a Communist living in the U.S.A

#16 isometrixk   Members   -  Reputation: 176

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 16 January 2011 - 07:24 PM

I see no need to use a heavy-duty language when I can use a nimble one instead, so at home I mostly use Python and Pygame. Notepad++ and Idle for writing code, Paint.NET for creating images and pen and paper to work out (game-)design issues.

Great reply, sir! I am the same exact way, I still use Paint to build basic components of my graphics & notepad for certain game writing, design, and note keeping.

#17 Captain P   Members   -  Reputation: 1092

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 17 January 2011 - 04:37 AM

Actually, Paint.NET is quite a bit more advanced than MS Paint - it's somewhere in-between Paint and Photoshop (and it's free). Layers, a proper history, effects, plugins... I wouldn't want to miss those anymore. ^_^ The same goes for Notepad++ - it's much better than plain old Notepad. Syntax coloring, auto-completion, tabbed interface, plugins (function list, explorer, diff tool)... it's more like a generic light-weight IDE than a text editor really.

Oh, forgot to mention - I'm using SVN for version control. I haven't put much thought into a backup strategy though so that mostly consists of mailing archives to myself, heh.
Create-ivity - a game development blog Mouseover for more information.

#18 farcodev   Members   -  Reputation: 160

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 17 January 2011 - 09:22 AM

I use Delphi 2009 (yup ObjectPascal dev alive here ), OpenOffice for the docs and calculations, UltraEdit for the xml, Lyx for the manual, a bit of photoshop and Maya + Mojoworld for the 3d. For the 3d dev i use mainly OpenGL.

For project updates i use a synch software + SVN/tortoise

when i need to compile C++ projects i use VS2010
---------------------------------
FAR Colony http://farcolony.blogspot.com/

#19 zerothrillz   Members   -  Reputation: 152

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 17 January 2011 - 09:30 AM

I use C++ with a simple makefile and emacs. Gimp for image editing. Milkshape 3D for my crappy programmer models. OpenGL with SDL or GLUT are my choices for APIs. Any tools needed for editing my games I usually make myself. Putting together a 3D level designer has never been something I shy away from.

#20 bdragoncat   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 18 January 2011 - 12:02 AM

Python, for the language. PyScripter, for the IDE. Panda3d, for the game engine. Photoshop for image editing. Blender for 3d modeling.


How do you feel about programming in Python?
I mean , is it simple and easy to write the code compare to C , and how is the efficiency of CPU?




Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS