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How much maths needed to understand papers


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#1 wildboar   Members   -  Reputation: 281

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 06:06 PM

I am about to dedicate some time to get my maths up scratch.
Can anyone tell me how far I should study? And what topics are not very useful for this field.
My goal is to read and understand papers that are found in books like shaderx7

Thanks

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#2 KulSeran   Members   -  Reputation: 2582

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 06:21 PM

I am about to dedicate some time to get my maths up scratch.
Can anyone tell me how far I should study? And what topics are not very useful for this field.
My goal is to read and understand papers that are found in books like shaderx7

Thanks

Pick up a linear algebra book. Most graphics programming is really heavy on the affine transformation math (matrix/vector/quaternion).

#3 wildboar   Members   -  Reputation: 281

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 04:10 AM

Thanks for reply.
I already do have a good book on linear algebra, and I know
quite a bit of it but I always see the intergral/integrate symbol that looks like f
I know thats from calculus but I dont know how deep inside it is.

#4 Emergent   Members   -  Reputation: 971

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 12:32 PM

Thanks for reply.
I already do have a good book on linear algebra, and I know
quite a bit of it but I always see the intergral/integrate symbol that looks like f
I know thats from calculus but I dont know how deep inside it is.


If you were to do, say, a first course in calculus, you'd be learning about derivatives almost as soon as you started. My guess is you'd run into integrals around midterms. So, not super deep. You can totally learn it on your own.

My only recommendation is to study physics at the same time. That'll motivate the calculus a lot.

#5 apatriarca   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1772

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 01:02 PM

You will probably also need multi-variate calculus since in graphics and physics you often have to integrate on 2 or 3 dimensional domains (for example on surfaces).

#6 nikitablack   Members   -  Reputation: 609

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Posted 21 March 2011 - 01:10 AM

I'm also have a lack of knowledge in calculus. I'm reading Eberly, Mitrich, other papers but I can't understand so deep as I want. Could you advise really good book on high mathematica ('high mathematica' - it's name of discipline that lectures in university in Russia), with good explanation of integrals, differentials (all that chain rules etc.).

#7 Burnt_Fyr   Members   -  Reputation: 1248

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Posted 21 March 2011 - 11:53 AM

I'm also have a lack of knowledge in calculus. I'm reading Eberly, Mitrich, other papers but I can't understand so deep as I want. Could you advise really good book on high mathematica ('high mathematica' - it's name of discipline that lectures in university in Russia), with good explanation of integrals, differentials (all that chain rules etc.).


How about this?

#8 nikitablack   Members   -  Reputation: 609

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Posted 22 March 2011 - 01:21 PM

Looks good. Thank you.

#9 batabek   Members   -  Reputation: 148

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 03:29 AM

There is no exact answer to your question. Papers are usually written about a technical subject, so you should be familiar with the terminology and also the concepts. Even though I'm superior at math, I do sometimes search about the material that I don't have a clue.
"A human being is a part of a whole, called by us,universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest... a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty."A. Einstein




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