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#1 hunter2   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 09:36 AM

Is anyone aware of any new (game) Programming Languages (not game engines) that have come out in the last 5 years or so? I would like to make some comparisons between them and C++, Java, etc... and maybe list any others that I may have missed. I would like to compare & contrast things like the amount of time it takes to do certain things with them, which ones are more user friendly...things like that. I started messing around with Go! and was very amused by how efficient & user friendly it is compared to C. It takes a lot of things that I was annoyed with and fixed them. Anywho, it gave me some ideas...Thanks!

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#2 Promit   Moderators   -  Reputation: 7694

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 09:40 AM

C# is just a bit older than that, having appeared in 2001. And even though it's actually fairly old, you should definitely include Lua and probably JavaScript.

#3 rip-off   Moderators   -  Reputation: 8764

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 10:01 AM

Instead of looking at "new" languages (meaning recently created), consider looking at ones that have recently risen to prominence. It can take many years for a programming language to gain the critical mass of users, libraries and tools before it can be considered a serious option.

#4 Splinter of Chaos   Members   -  Reputation: 239

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 10:03 AM

A quick google found me 12 New Programming Languages. There's probably more, but i lost interest realizing there are probably way too many more.

#5 hunter2   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 10:10 AM

Instead of looking at "new" languages (meaning recently created), consider looking at ones that have recently risen to prominence. It can take many years for a programming language to gain the critical mass of users, libraries and tools before it can be considered a serious option.


I completely agree. I was going take a look at the newest (well known) languages as well as the ones that have been around for a long time and established themselves. It's not like I'm going to use this as a basis for anything, just to scratch an itch for the most part. Thanks for your input. :)

#6 Telastyn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3730

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 11:15 AM

If you're including Java in the list of game programming languages, then Scala should be on your list if it isn't.

ApochPiq's language is perhaps noteworthy due to context.
My language is less good, and not really available, but it's rare I get a chance to plug it.
F# is relatively new and noteworthy
Groovy perhaps...
I saw Archetype a few weeks back...

And this thread might be useful/interesting for things that are even more esoteric.

#7 MeshGearFox   Members   -  Reputation: 158

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 11:50 AM

Also in terms of newness, it can be a long time between initial creation and standardization or reaching some final state at least. Or some are proprietary that become available to the general public later on. Erlang, for instance.

There's also a new Lisp out like every other week.



#8 Ravyne   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 8187

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 12:21 PM

Scala is interesting, particularly once they get the CLR-targetting back on track -- then you'll have one language that can target Android, PC, Windows Phone 7 and Xbox 360 Indie Games. It favors immutability and a functional programming style, but it doesn't require it.

There's Ceylon, announced earlier this week, and while the primary focus is as a business language, there are some nice things about it overall. But, of course, its years away from being of any practical use -- probably even years away from being adopted by its target audience... but its a JVM language, so once the language itself is stable all the JVM libraries are already available.

Then there's D, a systems-language like C, C++ or Go! -- Its got tons of powerful features and the team behind it is very strong. The only thing I kind of dislike about it is how many keywords there are. Its not a big deal, but I tend to believe (perhaps wrongly) that fewer keywords is a sign of good language design -- then again, if you reserve too few words to start with, you end up like C and C++ overloading keywords to mean different things in different contexts, which I certainly am *not* advocating for.


For what its worth Scala and D are the top two on my list of "If you could only ever learn/use 5 language technologies, what would they be?"; the others being T-SQL, XML and JavaScript. Admittedly the list is not about practicality or marketable skills per se -- its about having a set of languages that expose you to the widest array of techniques and ways of thinking, and I think it does a good job at that.

#9 Antheus   Members   -  Reputation: 2397

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 12:52 PM

There's Ceylon, announced earlier this week, and while the primary focus is as a business language, there are some nice things about it overall. But, of course, its years away from being of any practical use -- probably even years away from being adopted by its target audience... but its a JVM language, so once the language itself is stable all the JVM libraries are already available.


Ceylon is a joke. It's sad that RedHat name is associated with it.

Can we also not list languages which don't have a spec, working compiler or anything beyond one single PowerPoint presentation at some backwater conference (probably got laughed out everywhere else).

#10 joew   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3681

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 01:00 PM

A quick google found me 12 New Programming Languages. There's probably more, but i lost interest realizing there are probably way too many more.

That link is not showing "12 new programming langauges" at all, the author explicitly states he is attempting to learn those 12 languages. I mean if you just quickly glance at it you'll see Erlang, Scheme, Scala, and Lua listed in your "new" languages.

Personally as I've worked a lot in real-time network games and systems I find Erlang to be a great language (although it can't be classed as a 'new' language as it has been used for many years and is battle tested on real world systems.



#11 PolyVox   Members   -  Reputation: 708

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Posted 16 April 2011 - 03:52 AM

I've often thought that Falcon look interesting, but haven't tried it myself yet. From their webpage:

Falcon is an Open Source, simple, fast and powerful programming language, easy to learn and to feel comfortable with, and a scripting engine ready to empower mission-critical multithreaded applications.

Falcon provides six integrated programming paradigms: procedural, object oriented, prototype oriented, functional, tabular and message oriented. And you don't have to master all of them; you just need to pick the ingredients you prefer, and let the code to follow your inspiration.



#12 MeshGearFox   Members   -  Reputation: 158

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Posted 16 April 2011 - 09:15 PM

Falcon provides six integrated programming paradigms: procedural, object oriented, prototype oriented, functional, tabular and message oriented. And you don't have to master all of them; you just need to pick the ingredients you prefer, and let the code to follow your inspiration.






If you have functional programming, you have closures, and if you have closures you can pretty much implement whatever sort of object system you want. I'm not sure that tabular even counts as a paradigm.



#13 Zahlman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 1682

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 01:29 PM

I'm vaguely amused that nobody mentioned Python yet.

(It's older than Java btw.)

#14 wqking   Members   -  Reputation: 756

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 08:23 PM

D language?

Personally I don't know it, but the name sounds cool. D, aha, brother of C?

http://www.cpgf.org/
cpgf library -- free C++ open source library for reflection, serialization, script binding, callbacks, and meta data for OpenGL Box2D, SFML and Irrlicht.
v1.5.5 was released. Now supports tween and timeline for ease animation.





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