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U guyz still haven''t learnt


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18 replies to this topic

#1 INVERSED   Members   -  Reputation: 172

Posted 05 January 2000 - 04:52 AM

Geez, I am so tired of seeing this that it''s driving me crazy. I seem to be finding it in chat rooms and web forums all over the net, what I am talking about is learnt, u see it in ur messages, in ur icq''s and in ur im''s. You know what I mean. I advocate we stop flagrently using a word which does not exist in the english language (american english at least). Here, let me break it down for you: you may learn, you may have learned, and you may be learning. You could have been learning (progressive tense I believe). Hell, ur friend may have even learned, but I doubt any of u have ever, EVER learnt anything a day in your life. If you have,, please let me know, and tell me how you did it. If you haven''t and r lying about it, you should be ashamed of yourselves (oh and another thing, it is only yourselves, never yourselfs). Thanks for listening to my little rant, and this may for ever be know as the day INVERSED went postal on learnting.

Sponsor:

#2 Brad   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Posted 05 January 2000 - 05:52 AM

This from a guy who uses "r" and "ur" frequently ????

=)

It seems as if you are so concerned about grammer that you would at least take the time to TYPE out your words.



#3 ghowland   Members   -  Reputation: 134

Posted 05 January 2000 - 06:25 AM

Its amazing how repetition can set almost anyone off about anything.

-Geoff


#4 BigMeanBear   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Posted 05 January 2000 - 07:02 AM

GRRR!!! I AM SO SICK OF EVERYONE WANTING TO DISCUSS BLITTING AND ANIMATION AND Z-BUFFERS AND PIXEL FORMATS AND DIRECTX AND COMPUTER GAMES N SHIT!!!! DAMN, PEOPLE GET A LIFE!!!



-Erik L. Elmore

#5 Dave Astle   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 2307

Posted 05 January 2000 - 11:11 AM

HAHAHAHA

#6 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

Posted 05 January 2000 - 04:35 PM

"you have been learning" would be in the present perfect progressive tense.

Your local linguist,
-Nick

#7 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

Posted 05 January 2000 - 04:56 PM

It sucks. Such a staement is a complete thought and it politely expresses just how fucked up I see pimply-faced people who wantonly reinvent the English language. Oh, the language continuously changes and develops. For instance, my father insisted that a car was properly known as an automobile since trains pulled cars. Assholes who insist upon scripting spoken English instead of using proper English demonstrate the negative influences of television and radio. Oh, by the way- I worked in broadcasting for 15 years. If i misspelled something- excuse the fuck out of me, dude.

#8 olp-fan   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Posted 05 January 2000 - 06:24 PM

Check it out... and heed these words

Generally people use short hand and ''colloquial'' terms as my English teacher would put it because they are locked up in technicality. If you are writing a computer program and have to quickly respond to an e-mail before you lose your train of thought you will most likely use a term like ''learnt'' because it sounds right to you, despite its grammatical foundation. As you can see, when I am actually thinking about what I am writing, I can generally write a very fluent paragraph although my punctuation is less than average. But remember, when you are not in school or writing a report don''t be so uptight and let your words flow out. Come on, lighten up, if you can understand what someone is saying, don''t criticize it (I get enough of that from my English Teacher).


Rock on,
- Tom

#9 TANSTAAFL   Moderators   -  Reputation: 1152

Posted 05 January 2000 - 07:54 PM

well, i just couldnt help myself....

i really like the whole "get off my back, my english teacher is bad enough" attitude. those who have this attitude are of the same mentality as most of the people i went to high school with (8 years ago, havent seen most of them since). failure to use standard spelling (a certain small percentage of misspelling is allowable, it cant be helped), and the excessive use of trendy slang (i.e. talking like a character in a recently released movie or recent tv show) will do you more harm than good.

"but i dont do it all the time! i only do it when i''m around my friends. i know how to speak good english! really, i do!"

oh, do you? first of all, it is "i know how to speak english well", but thats not the point. here''s a breakdown of some pretty realistic way that things happen. when you are used to a certain mode of speech, or writing in a certain programming language, switching to another mode of speech is difficult, and you will constantly slip back into the style to which you are accustomed. so, if you speak like a punkass 90% of the time, the 10% of the rest of the time, you''re impetus will make you slip into your usually manner of speaking.... sometimes at very unfortunate places and times, like a job interview. no, i''m not saying that speaking proper english will make you sound smarter. i''m just saying that speaking with too much slang will make you sound dumb.

the same goes for writing. someday, you may be interviewing for a programming job. in most cases, there is usually some sort of programming test, where you have to rewrite itoa() or something. they will expect you to comment your work, and using stupid text-slang will make you look like an idiot.

however, if you WANT to look like an idiot, that''s fine by me. that way i dont have to give you a second thought.



#10 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

Posted 05 January 2000 - 09:00 PM

People should not worry so much about other peoples mistakes if they are going to make some themselves. They definitely shouldn''t comment on respective IQ''s. Notice the capitals at the start of each sentence. Please don''t start a vicious circle and point my inevitable spelling mistakes or you are missing the point.

#11 Xai   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1459

Posted 05 January 2000 - 09:20 PM

A Silly Poem About Silly People

silly silly silly
why are we all so god damned silly
''american'' english as a proper language
geeks and kids as martyrs

wishes dreams ghosts
the neurosis of our ancestors
beat into our heads as childen
as we beat into our own in turn

coders artists gamers
arguing over trivialities
arguing for formality (in expression)
and they don''t think the jokes on them?

holier than though they act
in crystal palaces full of stones
waiting for the quad damage camper
to put them in their place

anything to save face
oh, what a waste.

#12 kressilac   Members   -  Reputation: 110

Posted 06 January 2000 - 02:39 AM

I had to respond to this post. People, remember the medium that we are communicating on. The Internet extends all over the world. While the primary language on the internet and this site is English, that does not mean that everyone using the site grew up in an English speaking country. Not all of us have had English beaten into our craniums since we were in the womb. While I admit, at times I have no ability to tolerate bad English, I understand that many people do not have the same English backround that I may have. Its about tollerance folks. Deal with it. Politely correct grammar if you have to. If you do or say anything more you begin to sound like John Rocker of the Atlanta Braves.

Kressilac
ps Many foreigners won't be insulted if you help them get better at speaking English in a polite non insulting manner.

Edited by - kressilac on 1/6/00 8:42:07 AM

#13 INVERSED   Members   -  Reputation: 172

Posted 06 January 2000 - 02:37 PM

Actually, kressilac, I think most of the poeple making miss spellings such as learnt, are americans. I studied japanese for like 4 years, and in that entire time we where learning "correct" japanese (Tokyo dialect I believe). My point is that when you take a foreign language (i.e., American english to any non american), you tend to learn correct grammar and, in some cases, pronunciation. What tends to be lacking is idomatic expressions and what not. Foriegners are probably not likely to make a mistake like learnt, because learnt is based on dialectual (is that a word) pronunciation of learned (which foriegners would probably never know). Just my 2 cents (which with the original statement makes 4 cents, pretty soon I''ll have a nickle).

#14 Stefpet   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Posted 06 January 2000 - 11:11 PM

What a coincidence! I just wrote the Oxford Placement Test a couple of days ago. It's a test which determines how good you are in english (sort of).

In that test there was this sentence:
55. English is quite difficult because of all the exceptions which have to be learnt.

Is it ok to write learnt in brittish english or is the test itself wrong? Strange...


Edited by - Stefpet on 1/7/00 5:13:15 AM

#15 sherman   Members   -  Reputation: 151

Posted 07 January 2000 - 08:00 AM

Hmmm....I know the topic is about American English but the word learnt does exist in British English. Here is an excerpt from the Oxford Dictionary:

learn verb (past & past participle learned or learnt) get knowledge of or skill in by study, experience or being taught; commit to memory; (usually + of, about) be told about, find out.

I personally prefer to use learnt as the past tense because learned has another meaning:

learned adjective having much knowledge from studying; showing or requiring learning.

Hope that helps =)

Best regards,
Sherman

#16 Potsticker   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Posted 07 January 2000 - 12:59 PM

Learnt seems to be a valid word as far as dictionary.com is concerned. Not necessarily the best source, but I''d make it a lot more reliable than people making inflammatory posts on a bulletin board.

#17 INVERSED   Members   -  Reputation: 172

Posted 10 January 2000 - 06:50 PM

Well I''ll be, it is a word. Anywaze, lighten up, get a sense of uhmor, it was a joke.

#18 Hjalmarsson   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Posted 20 January 2000 - 07:06 AM

I think that the majority of the people messaging on this message board is NOT from the United States!
So, you should be happy to be able to read what the other is writing!

Oh by the way, this forum should be about game-programming, or???


Martin Hjalmarsson
programming@swipnet.se
ICQ# 22869599

#19 Chris F   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Posted 20 January 2000 - 10:43 AM

well im not saying i agree with the post but this forum is not just for game developement, it says at the begining IT DOES NOT HAVE TO BE ABOUT GAME DEVELOPMENT!




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