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Selling eternal life! Is anyone interested?


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Poll: Selling eternal life! Is anyone interested? (81 member(s) have cast votes)

Would you pay to live forever on a hard drive?

  1. Yes (18 votes [22.22%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 22.22%

  2. Maybe (22 votes [27.16%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 27.16%

  3. No (41 votes [50.62%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 50.62%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#1 SteveDeFacto   Banned   -  Reputation: 105

Posted 05 May 2011 - 07:43 AM

I've been thinking about brain computer interfaces a lot lately since in my opinion they are the future of video games and the internet as a whole. Imagine actually being inside a video game or accessing facebook or twitter with your mind or even pulling up information from google without physically typing one word or carrying a laptop/cell phone.

I also think this would bring into affect a new open source government utilizing collective intelligence in which citizens would be able to vote on key issues with nothing more than a thought. Eventually we would be able to emulate neural networks surpassing 100 billion neurons and true artificial intelligence would be born. At this point one could simply scan their brain and live forever but all of this is very far into the future.

Except possibly a super high resolution brain scanner which would allow you to live forever on no more than a few terabytes of hard drive space! Think about, if there were a scanner capable of capturing imagines with high enough resolution to see cellular structures and what they are made of, this could conceivably be used to construct a virtual model of a human brain. In the future these images could be used to emulate the the person exactly as they were at the time of the scan.

So in conclusion, I'm wondering how many of you would be interested in such a scan if the technology were available today? I know I would jump on it in a heartbeat!Posted Image

Sponsor:

#2 ryan20fun   Members   -  Reputation: 660

Posted 05 May 2011 - 07:50 AM

why dont you add a poll ?, it will be a lot easy'er to see the results :D
Never say Never, Because Never comes too soon. - ryan20fun

Disclaimer: Each post of mine is intended as an attempt of helping and/or bringing some meaningfull insight to the topic at hand. Due to my nature, my good intentions will not always be plainly visible. I apologise in advance and assure you I mean no harm and do not intend to insult anyone.

#3 A Brain in a Vat   Members   -  Reputation: 313

Posted 05 May 2011 - 08:03 AM

Assuming that there exists such a scanner, it doesn't follow that there necessarily exists the technology to reconstruct a brain with the exact state as the scanned one. But assuming that there is such a technique..

Yeah, I think it's obvious that almost everyone would do it. The question is whether everyone could afford it.

I'm curious why you seem to think it would be good to have a pure democracy -- one in which everyone voted on everything. I look around this country and the average level intelligence and I thank god most these people are too lazy to get off the couch and go in to vote.

#4 rip-off   Moderators   -  Reputation: 7651

Posted 05 May 2011 - 08:32 AM

You wouldn't live forever... the copy of you on the computer might though.

#5 SteveDeFacto   Banned   -  Reputation: 105

Posted 05 May 2011 - 08:47 AM

You wouldn't live forever... the copy of you on the computer might though.



It's essentially the same thing but you just have to look at it from a logical prospective instead of an emotional one. It's known fact that every living cell in your body is replaced in a period of no more than 7 years. The structures and information that makes "you" are maintained but the physical living cells are gone. The structure of your brain and your DNA is information that can be stored on a hard drive. This information can be used to rebuild "you" just like the natural processes in your body do in no more than 7 years.

#6 SteveDeFacto   Banned   -  Reputation: 105

Posted 05 May 2011 - 08:54 AM

Assuming that there exists such a scanner, it doesn't follow that there necessarily exists the technology to reconstruct a brain with the exact state as the scanned one. But assuming that there is such a technique..

Yeah, I think it's obvious that almost everyone would do it. The question is whether everyone could afford it.

I'm curious why you seem to think it would be good to have a pure democracy -- one in which everyone voted on everything. I look around this country and the average level intelligence and I thank god most these people are too lazy to get off the couch and go in to vote.


I don't think a pure democracy would work with stupid people. This is the reason I think there should be a competency test on every vote made. Personally I also think the right to have children should be restricted which would solve the idiot problem in the long run and over population as well...

#7 way2lazy2care   Members   -  Reputation: 782

Posted 05 May 2011 - 09:01 AM

I would not want to live on a hard drive as I couldn't do anything besides exist. If there were a significantly powerful CPU attached, I would have to think about it more.

#8 Bow_vernon   Members   -  Reputation: 137

Posted 05 May 2011 - 09:12 AM

I dont want to live on a hard drive, I live a "hard" life already...ugh life sucks x(

#9 Rattrap   Members   -  Reputation: 1496

Posted 05 May 2011 - 09:26 AM


You wouldn't live forever... the copy of you on the computer might though.

It's essentially the same thing but you just have to look at it from a logical prospective instead of an emotional one. It's known fact that every living cell in your body is replaced in a period of no more than 7 years. The structures and information that makes "you" are maintained but the physical living cells are gone. The structure of your brain and your DNA is information that can be stored on a hard drive. This information can be used to rebuild "you" just like the natural processes in your body do in no more than 7 years.


This reminds me of something in the The Prestige (not going to put any spoilers here). I'd have to agree with rip-off. The computer version might see it that way, but I'm not sure the original who has to actual die will.

Also, how will you really know the copy of you is "you"? Given the fact that the two will co-exist at some point, wouldn't that prove it really isn't you, since from that point on it really is two separate lives making separate decisions.

#10 rip-off   Moderators   -  Reputation: 7651

Posted 05 May 2011 - 09:55 AM

It's essentially the same thing but you just have to look at it from a logical prospective instead of an emotional one.

Not really. I know cells get replenished, that is beside the point. I might be constantly gaining and losing cells, but from moment to moment there is a lot of continuity.

The desire to live a long life is that ones perceived state of consciousness gets to continue. If you creates an independent copy of yourself, then if it continues for a long time it doesn't change the fact that your consciousness will still lead a divergent life and eventually face a biological end. I don't know how much consolation having such a copy would provide, trapped as we are in our mortal bodies.

Marketing it as "eternal life" seems like false advertising to me.

I don't think a pure democracy would work with stupid people...

I don't necessarily believe the average person is stupid. That is the impression one gets from having to listen to a loud minority. I believe most people are apathetic and uninterested, stemming from the limited control they have over the decisions they care about. Direct democracy where you are voting on individual issues would probably increase political engagement and decrease apathy, if it could be done in an efficient manner. The proposed system, barring fraud concerns, would be a candidate in enabling some form of direct democracy.

It would certainly be interesting so see the outcome of such a process. I know Switzerland has some form of direct democracy but even then they are limited by the physical nature of the polling system.

#11 Promit   Moderators   -  Reputation: 6096

Posted 05 May 2011 - 09:57 AM

Caroline deleted.

#12 Rattrap   Members   -  Reputation: 1496

Posted 05 May 2011 - 10:15 AM

Caroline deleted.


I'd say, that about sums it up.

#13 way2lazy2care   Members   -  Reputation: 782

Posted 05 May 2011 - 10:34 AM

This reminds me of something in the The Prestige (not going to put any spoilers here). I'd have to agree with rip-off. The computer version might see it that way, but I'm not sure the original who has to actual die will.

Also, how will you really know the copy of you is "you"? Given the fact that the two will co-exist at some point, wouldn't that prove it really isn't you, since from that point on it really is two separate lives making separate decisions.


What would you think about it from a species advancement perspective? If we could store our smartest minds on a harddrive to keep on working post death, we could see some amazing advancements. Any reasonably driven person could reach many times the knowledge gained by any biological human. It would also be interesting to see how much a human brain could think of with the entire knowledge base of humanity interfaced with their "brain".

#14 samoth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4510

Posted 05 May 2011 - 10:42 AM

A modern harddisk has an alleged MTBF of 600,000 hours (about 68 years). The observed MTBF of the disks that I owned during the last 10 years was around 15,000 hours (there used to be a time, during the 1980s, when harddisks were of a much better quality).

I would really hope for my personal MTBF being somewhat higher than 15,000 hours.

(This means: no)

#15 Rattrap   Members   -  Reputation: 1496

Posted 05 May 2011 - 11:05 AM

What would you think about it from a species advancement perspective? If we could store our smartest minds on a harddrive to keep on working post death, we could see some amazing advancements. Any reasonably driven person could reach many times the knowledge gained by any biological human. It would also be interesting to see how much a human brain could think of with the entire knowledge base of humanity interfaced with their "brain".



Can you really call it a human brain after it has been digitized?
Would it perceive itself as human anymore and if not, would it care about humanity anymore like Doctor_Manhattan in Watchmen?
Which species would it be more interested in advancing: human or electronic?

#16 SteveDeFacto   Banned   -  Reputation: 105

Posted 05 May 2011 - 11:15 AM


What would you think about it from a species advancement perspective? If we could store our smartest minds on a harddrive to keep on working post death, we could see some amazing advancements. Any reasonably driven person could reach many times the knowledge gained by any biological human. It would also be interesting to see how much a human brain could think of with the entire knowledge base of humanity interfaced with their "brain".



Can you really call it a human brain after it has been digitized?
Would it perceive itself as human anymore and if not, would it care about humanity anymore like Doctor_Manhattan in Watchmen?
Which species would it be more interested in advancing: human or electronic?



It would be the person who was copied though I guess over time it's perspective may change. Like if you gave a hobo a million dollars they would become stuck up over a very short period of time. If you gave someone eternal life who knows what may happen?



#17 owl   Banned   -  Reputation: 364

Posted 05 May 2011 - 11:20 AM

Only if I can befriend with JC and Halo.
I like the Walrus best.

#18 Rattrap   Members   -  Reputation: 1496

Posted 05 May 2011 - 11:34 AM

And of course we know how it will ultimately end...

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#19 way2lazy2care   Members   -  Reputation: 782

Posted 05 May 2011 - 11:36 AM

Can you really call it a human brain after it has been digitized?
Would it perceive itself as human anymore and if not, would it care about humanity anymore like Doctor_Manhattan in Watchmen?
Which species would it be more interested in advancing: human or electronic?


I don't think I called it a human brain. I'd still argue it was a human consciousness though, as it started that way. Really it comes down to what makes you human; your physical body or something else? In the case of Doctor Manhattan, I would still consider him a "human" consciousness despite having a non-human form and vastly expanded capabilities. I will say it did always bug me how he seemed to lose humor after becoming more intelligent as, in my experience, intelligence affects humor positively rather than negatively.

#20 Rattrap   Members   -  Reputation: 1496

Posted 05 May 2011 - 11:51 AM

I don't think I called it a human brain. I'd still argue it was a human consciousness though, as it started that way. Really it comes down to what makes you human; your physical body or something else? In the case of Doctor Manhattan, I would still consider him a "human" consciousness despite having a non-human form and vastly expanded capabilities. I will say it did always bug me how he seemed to lose humor after becoming more intelligent as, in my experience, intelligence affects humor positively rather than negatively.



I don't believe it had anything to do with his intelligence, as much as his perception of reality. He barely saw himself as human. In fact I think the only reason he did was due to his perception of all events on his life, past, present, and future, all at the same time. He knew the future, but he also knew he couldn't change it. His conversations with Laurie on the Mars were some of my favorites, where he would talk about conversations they hadn't had yet. The women in his life were pretty much his only real tie to humanity, which when those were severed, he pretty much gave up on humanity.




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