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Real word to game world scale


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Poll: Real word to game world scale (27 member(s) have cast votes)

What scale do you use in your games/projects?

  1. 1 meter = 0.1 unit along an axis (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  2. 1 meter = 1 unit along an axis (24 votes [88.89%])

    Percentage of vote: 88.89%

  3. 1 meter = 10 unit along an axis (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  4. 1 meter = 100 unit along an axis (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  5. 1 meter = 500 unit along an axis (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  6. Other. Post in a comment (3 votes [11.11%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.11%

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#1 TiagoCosta   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1928

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Posted 18 May 2011 - 12:59 PM

Just to know what other people use. :rolleyes:

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Tiago Costa
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#2 Sirisian   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1686

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Posted 18 May 2011 - 02:07 PM

I think you'll see a general consensus of 1 meter = 1.0. It's really the only logical choice if you're using metric since meter is the base unit.

#3 Danny02   Members   -  Reputation: 271

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Posted 18 May 2011 - 08:33 PM

when using floating point numbers it really doesn't matter, you will always have the same amount of precision. So using 1.0 for 1 meter is just convenient to use, because you don't have to calculate how much meter 342 is when 1 meter is 4,7

#4 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 28613

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Posted 18 May 2011 - 09:32 PM

I prefer to work in metres, but the games I've worked on have used:
  • 1unit = 1m (work in metres)
  • 1unit = 0.01m (work in centimetres)
  • 1unit = 0.0254m (work in inches)
Obviously if you were doing an epic space sim, or a planet sim, or a bacteria game, or something of a non-human scale, then you probably wouldn't work in metres though.

#5 yckx   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1163

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 02:35 PM

I'm making a Pac-Man clone, so scale is an abstract concept for me at the moment. Although, if I were pressed to give a hard answer, based on how I have just imagined the maze if it were to be an actual physical object, I'd have to say 1 unit ~ 0.75 inches as a very rough estimate ;)

#6 MrDaaark   Members   -  Reputation: 3551

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 03:18 PM

1 Unity = 1 Meter has pretty much become standard among all the DCC packages. All lighting and physics tools tend to assume 1U = 1M too. You should stick to it whenever possible, unless the scope of what you are working on prevents it.

#7 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5971

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 04:07 PM

I use whatever suits the project, 1 Unit = 1 meter is a good option in most situations involving human sized objects , if your objects are much larger or smaller it becomes natural to think of their sizes using different units aswell and you really want to use the most natural scale to avoid the hassle of having to think about the scale all the time.

Making a bacteria model using 1U = 1m would be a bit insane since you'd end up with models in the 0.000001 unit size range (at this point the artists have to think about the scale to avoid making the objects the wrong size , 1U = 1 μm would be far easier to work with.)
I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
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#8 NEXUSKill   Members   -  Reputation: 453

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Posted 20 May 2011 - 02:06 PM

While 1 to 1 is usually the used scale, I would suggest this is completely arbitrary and depends on the scale of your game, take spore for instance, if the size of the creatures is around 1x1x2 imagine the size of the planets!! you would loose precision like hell, the scale is whatever best fits your game while preserving as much precision as possible, you could fit entire worlds in a 1x1x1 box (not to mention the render pretty much does that).
Game making is godlike

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#9 Danny02   Members   -  Reputation: 271

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Posted 21 May 2011 - 07:41 AM

As said before, the scale of your system doesn't have to do anything with precision. You will always have problems with precision when dealing with great scale differences which have to be taken of.




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