Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

FREE SOFTWARE GIVEAWAY

We have 4 x Pro Licences (valued at $59 each) for 2d modular animation software Spriter to give away in this Thursday's GDNet Direct email newsletter.


Read more in this forum topic or make sure you're signed up (from the right-hand sidebar on the homepage) and read Thursday's newsletter to get in the running!


Rubix Cubes


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
4 replies to this topic

#1 ChurchSkiz   Members   -  Reputation: 458

Posted 01 June 2011 - 07:16 AM

So I was watching another Rubix cube video and I was thinking to myself, "Ok this is getting old, people are pretty awesome at it, not much left to do." And I was thinking of a variant of Rubix cubing that might be a lot more challenging. Hand someone a solved Rubix cube (or I guess it could be messed up too), and show them a picture of a cube with a specific pattern on it (ie RGB, WBR, YYW) for every side, and then have them work to get that specific pattern. Reverse Rubix Cubing.

What do you think?

Sponsor:

#2 Krohm   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3261

Posted 01 June 2011 - 11:17 AM

I don't think its more difficult by itself (strictly mathematically speaking). Surely it will be even more confusing as the patterns are more difficult to remember than a flat color per-side. Might eventually turn out interesting to rubik fans. It sounds nice.

#3 HappyCoder   Members   -  Reputation: 2886

Posted 01 June 2011 - 11:58 AM

What is a challenge is start with a solved cube, then apply some restriction to what can be turned. A few examples are:
  • you are only allowed to turn two faces.
  • you are only allowed to turn three faces.
  • Select to pieces that are side by side and those pieces can never be separated, as if they were glued together
  • The top and bottom face can be rotated freely, the other four faces can only be rotated 180 degrees.
Those are just a few ideas but more can easily be invented. You then mix up the cube using the selected rule. If you selected to turn only two of the faces then only those two faces can be used to mix it up and to solve it. That basic idea has helped me get more enjoyment out of my rubik's cube. I have still yet to solve the third variation I have listed above.

#4 Ezbez   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1164

Posted 01 June 2011 - 12:07 PM

Note that not all imaginable combinations are possible (eg: flip two opposite center pieces, leave everything else the same) and finding out which ones aren't is non-trivial. I suppose the only good way would be to scramble a cube and ask someone to get a solved cube to that state.

#5 The_Neverending_Loop   Members   -  Reputation: 626

Posted 01 June 2011 - 12:15 PM

Posted Image




Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS