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Should I choose hardware engineer or software engineer or programmer as my career?


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33 replies to this topic

#1 rocketkiller   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 07 July 2011 - 04:44 AM

Should I choose hardware engineer or software engineer or programmer as my career?

Sponsor:

#2 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 31143

Posted 07 July 2011 - 04:52 AM

ok

#3 JSoftware   Members   -  Reputation: 318

Posted 07 July 2011 - 05:10 AM

ok

#4 rip-off   Moderators   -  Reputation: 8527

Posted 07 July 2011 - 07:29 AM

Which do you prefer?

#5 ChurchSkiz   Members   -  Reputation: 455

Posted 07 July 2011 - 07:30 AM

Should I choose hardware engineer or software engineer or programmer as my career?


Yes

#6 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5593

Posted 07 July 2011 - 07:45 AM

Guess that depends, do you want to actually work for a living?

#7 JoeCooper   Members   -  Reputation: 338

Posted 07 July 2011 - 08:20 AM

Why not join the army and go into sharpshooting instead?

Your family would never see it coming.

#8 ApochPiQ   Moderators   -  Reputation: 16079

Posted 07 July 2011 - 11:02 AM

You know, you guys could at least try to post on topic. Please remember that one of the Lounge rules is not to post just to post - and that includes replies as well as starting threads.

#9 way2lazy2care   Members   -  Reputation: 782

Posted 07 July 2011 - 11:32 AM

On topic: I'd go hardware engineer just because it's a little less generic and I always wished I had a more fundamental and physical knowledge of what was going on inside all my hardware. You kind of get the idea through logic gates and stuff, but that's still relatively abstract.

#10 JoeCooper   Members   -  Reputation: 338

Posted 07 July 2011 - 01:25 PM

I'd also go with hardware; comp sci folks are a dime a dozen, it lets you do things a comp sci person can't and you can probably do fine if games if you want to go that way if you can program and have a portfolio.

#11 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5593

Posted 07 July 2011 - 01:38 PM

I'd also go with hardware; comp sci folks are a dime a dozen, it lets you do things a comp sci person can't and you can probably do fine if games if you want to go that way if you can program and have a portfolio.



They are a dime a dozen because there are dozens ( ok, millions ) of jobs. Going to have a bitch of a time finding employement in electrical engineering field these days.

#12 way2lazy2care   Members   -  Reputation: 782

Posted 07 July 2011 - 02:01 PM

They are a dime a dozen because there are dozens ( ok, millions ) of jobs. Going to have a bitch of a time finding employement in electrical engineering field these days.


Why do you say that? It might not necessarily be games related, but there are plenty of places that need electrical engineers. Plus when the apocalypse comes they can still make computers while us programmers will have no idea what to do.

#13 stupid_programmer   Members   -  Reputation: 1182

Posted 07 July 2011 - 02:55 PM


They are a dime a dozen because there are dozens ( ok, millions ) of jobs. Going to have a bitch of a time finding employement in electrical engineering field these days.


Why do you say that? It might not necessarily be games related, but there are plenty of places that need electrical engineers. Plus when the apocalypse comes they can still make computers while us programmers will have no idea what to do.


My EE buddy has been unemployed since last year. Your mileage may vary.

#14 tstrimple   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1725

Posted 07 July 2011 - 03:36 PM

My EE buddy has been unemployed since last year. Your mileage may vary.


And I'm having a heck of a time finding good senior developers (that can speak English) in my area. All anecdotal of course, but the recruiters I'm using are all telling the same story. Plenty of companies looking, not a lot of talent available.

#15 JoeCooper   Members   -  Reputation: 338

Posted 08 July 2011 - 04:30 AM

I'll throw one on too. I knew a guy who didn't really know programming or anything who went in to get a CS degree. Now he's - I think - an AI researcher or something and does really fascinating stuff. It sounds like a joy.

I'll retract that comment about them being a "dime a dozen"; there's a lot of mediocre people in some fields, especially if they seem like the obvious thing to go into (CS is for a lot of people) and that inflates the figures and by no means that talent is common. If you're smart and serious, somebody needs you.

I can't say anything else except that the OP ought to think about what he has a passion for so that he'll take it seriously.

#16 rocketkiller   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 10 July 2011 - 09:10 AM

Which do you prefer?


I think I prefer software engineer..

#17 rocketkiller   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 10 July 2011 - 09:11 AM

Guess that depends, do you want to actually work for a living?


not sure cause now I doing my foundation course..

#18 rocketkiller   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 10 July 2011 - 09:11 AM

On topic: I'd go hardware engineer just because it's a little less generic and I always wished I had a more fundamental and physical knowledge of what was going on inside all my hardware. You kind of get the idea through logic gates and stuff, but that's still relatively abstract.


What do you mean by generic?

#19 rocketkiller   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 10 July 2011 - 09:12 AM

I'd also go with hardware; comp sci folks are a dime a dozen, it lets you do things a comp sci person can't and you can probably do fine if games if you want to go that way if you can program and have a portfolio.


Hardware is it easier to find job next time?

#20 rocketkiller   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 10 July 2011 - 09:13 AM


I'd also go with hardware; comp sci folks are a dime a dozen, it lets you do things a comp sci person can't and you can probably do fine if games if you want to go that way if you can program and have a portfolio.



They are a dime a dozen because there are dozens ( ok, millions ) of jobs. Going to have a bitch of a time finding employement in electrical engineering field these days.


sorry.. I dont learn E and E..




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