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Jagged Edges - Pro Solution?


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#1 DJTN   Members   -  Reputation: 207

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 05:53 PM

When moving around in my 3D world I’ve noticed jagged edges or corners when moving towards a mesh or away from it. At first I thought it might be my models polly count but then I loaded up a simple quad and got the same results. I then started thinking that it could be float precision errors in my transformations when setting the view, projection, and world matrices, but that wasn’t it either.



After some research, I think my problem could be solved by setting the multisampling type and quality in my present param’s but is that the proper way to handle jagged edges? After increasing the number of samples to FOUR_SAMPLES I noticed a slight blur effect when moving quickly but the jagged edges have resided somewhat.



How do the AAA titles resolve this issue?



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#2 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 30950

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 06:52 PM

The artefact commonly known as "jagged edges" or "jaggies" is known as "aliasing". The solutions are known as "anti-aliasing".

MSAA is one common solution, yes. On (underpowered) current-gen game consoles, screen-space AA techniques like MLAA, FXAA and DLAA are becoming popular.

#3 MJP   Moderators   -  Reputation: 11569

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 07:47 PM

MSAA is easy and effective for simple rendering. Basically if you don't use deferred rendering or HDR. HDR starts to quickly deteriorate the effectiveness of MSAA once your range gets big, and deferred rendering requires shader work to make it work at all (and then some more to make it efficient).

Post-process AA techniques like the ones Hodgman mentioned are becoming popular because they're easy and cheap no matter how complicated your renderer is. In terms of quality in some ways they're way better than MSAA, and in some ways totally inferior. Either way the fact that you can just drop in the FXAA shader and it works for everything (deferred, HDR, transparent, alpha tested, whatever) is making very popular lately.

#4 DJTN   Members   -  Reputation: 207

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 08:42 AM

Thanks guys. I look into the FXAA shader solution as it seems more flexible and scalable.

#5 smasherprog   Members   -  Reputation: 432

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 09:51 AM

For a deferred rendering system, I would recommend reading this http://nolimitsdesigns.com/game-design/fxaa-vs-mlaa/
Basically, in my testing, MLAA was more than double the speed of FXAA at better quality settings.
Wisdom is knowing when to shut up, so try it.
--Game Development http://nolimitsdesigns.com: Reliable UDP library, Threading library, Math Library, UI Library. Take a look, its all free.




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