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How much do you use your IDE?


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Poll: How much do you use your IDE? (96 member(s) have cast votes)

What tasks do you use your IDE (Integrated Development Environment) for?

  1. I do everything from within the IDE (edit code, compiling, debugging, etc.) (83 votes [86.46%])

    Percentage of vote: 86.46%

  2. I only use the IDE for specific tasks I can not do elsewhere (2 votes [2.08%])

    Percentage of vote: 2.08%

  3. I don't use the IDE for anything (9 votes [9.38%])

    Percentage of vote: 9.38%

  4. The development tools I use don't have an IDE (2 votes [2.08%])

    Percentage of vote: 2.08%

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#1 Dragonion   Members   -  Reputation: 131

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 03:34 AM

Just curious :)

Sponsor:

#2 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 27585

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 04:01 AM

Why would you not use an IDE? Are you chuck norris?

#3 szecs   Members   -  Reputation: 2093

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 04:03 AM

Any programmer worth a damn works with a hex editor directly with the .exe :P

#4 Dragonion   Members   -  Reputation: 131

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 04:16 AM

Why would you not use an IDE? Are you chuck norris?

Chuck Norris doesn't even need to code; he simply creates a binary beam from his forehead connecting with the computer and makes whatever program he wants instantly appear on the hard-drive ;)

#5 Tachikoma   Members   -  Reputation: 548

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 04:57 AM

No.

Chuck Norris makes code write itself.
Latest project: Sideways Racing on the iPad

#6 0Circle0   Members   -  Reputation: 342

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 05:47 AM

My IDE is Notepad,
for my java programs I create a batch file that compiles, jars, and signs my applet
javac SprCre.java
IF NOT EXIST SprCre.jar (
jar cvf SprCre.jar SprCre.class Sprites
) ELSE (
jar uf SprCre.jar SprCre.class Sprites
)
< response.txt keytool -genkey -keyalg rsa -alias YourSign
echo NotAPass| keytool -certreq -alias YourSign
echo NotAPass| jarsigner SprCre.jar YourSign
IF EXIST index.html echo Y | DEL index.html
echo ^<applet width=755 height=508 code="SprCre.class" archive="SprCre.jar"^> ^</applet^> >> index.html

I find an IDE tedious to use, especially Java ones(I tried using a few) where there are certain options you just cannot turn off. Some were so annoying I just went back to using Notepad.exe. I did like the format feature in Eclipse though, but is not needed unless looking at code that is not my own.

I do like Dev Bloodshed for doing C/C++, but I am mainly doing Java atm.

Sprite Creator 3 VX & XP

WARNING: I edit my posts constantly.


#7 Antheus   Members   -  Reputation: 2393

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 06:32 AM

It's 2011.

- Continuous integration toolkit
- Issue tracker
- Source repository
- staging/testing server/machine
- Release/deployment hosting
- An IDE
- Office/productivity suite

The bare minimums, all of which are available for free as well

#8 XXChester   Members   -  Reputation: 811

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 06:50 AM

My IDE is Notepad,
for my java programs I create a batch file that compiles, jars, and signs my applet

javac SprCre.java
IF NOT EXIST SprCre.jar (
jar cvf SprCre.jar SprCre.class Sprites
) ELSE (
jar uf SprCre.jar SprCre.class Sprites
)
< response.txt keytool -genkey -keyalg rsa -alias YourSign
echo NotAPass| keytool -certreq -alias YourSign
echo NotAPass| jarsigner SprCre.jar YourSign
IF EXIST index.html echo Y | DEL index.html
echo ^<applet width=755 height=508 code="SprCre.class" archive="SprCre.jar"^> ^</applet^> >> index.html

I find an IDE tedious to use, especially Java ones(I tried using a few) where there are certain options you just cannot turn off. Some were so annoying I just went back to using Notepad.exe. I did like the format feature in Eclipse though, but is not needed unless looking at code that is not my own.

I do like Dev Bloodshed for doing C/C++, but I am mainly doing Java atm.


Eeep just plain old notepad? Not even Notepad++ (free download). I couldn't imagine going back to not using an IDE, I use RAD 7.5.5 at work all day and I use Visual Studio 2010 for game development at home.

Remember to mark someones post as helpful if you found it so.

http://www.BrandonMcCulligh.ca


#9 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5761

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 06:57 AM

Any programmer worth a damn works with a hex editor directly with the .exe :P


http://xkcd.com/378/

For me it really depends on what i'm doing, the bigger the project the more useful the IDE becomes, for writing short scripts or modifying existing ones a good but lightweight text editor is a much better tool (i prefer vim for editing files)
I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#10 Telastyn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3718

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 07:03 AM

I will use vi in unix machines when I need to do c or c++ or perl there. Otherwise I'll use visual studio or netbeans (for java).

While I occasionally don't heed my own advice; programmers should use any tool available to them to create better things faster.

#11 0Circle0   Members   -  Reputation: 342

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 07:42 AM


My IDE is Notepad,
for my java programs I create a batch file that compiles, jars, and signs my applet

javac SprCre.java
IF NOT EXIST SprCre.jar (
jar cvf SprCre.jar SprCre.class Sprites
) ELSE (
jar uf SprCre.jar SprCre.class Sprites
)
< response.txt keytool -genkey -keyalg rsa -alias YourSign
echo NotAPass| keytool -certreq -alias YourSign
echo NotAPass| jarsigner SprCre.jar YourSign
IF EXIST index.html echo Y | DEL index.html
echo ^<applet width=755 height=508 code="SprCre.class" archive="SprCre.jar"^> ^</applet^> >> index.html

I find an IDE tedious to use, especially Java ones(I tried using a few) where there are certain options you just cannot turn off. Some were so annoying I just went back to using Notepad.exe. I did like the format feature in Eclipse though, but is not needed unless looking at code that is not my own.

I do like Dev Bloodshed for doing C/C++, but I am mainly doing Java atm.


Eeep just plain old notepad? Not even Notepad++ (free download). I couldn't imagine going back to not using an IDE, I use RAD 7.5.5 at work all day and I use Visual Studio 2010 for game development at home.


Nope just regular old Notepad.exe unless I am doing C/C++

Sprite Creator 3 VX & XP

WARNING: I edit my posts constantly.


#12 Dragonion   Members   -  Reputation: 131

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 07:54 AM

It's 2011.

- Continuous integration toolkit
- Issue tracker
- Source repository
- staging/testing server/machine
- Release/deployment hosting
- An IDE
- Office/productivity suite

The bare minimums, all of which are available for free as well

Or -still being in 2011- if you have that semi-autistic need to have 100% control of every single byte in your projects (both the binary and ASCII ones), you have a collection of scripts and manage everything from a console. Mmm ... just seing the screen get flooded with text as every lille component is processed individually like a large clockwork being assembled in perfect harmony. What beauty! Not saying that I am that type, of course ;D

#13 Bregma   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4757

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 07:56 AM

Nobody has ever demonstrated to me what possible advantage I could gain by using an IDE. I have encountered many disadvantages.
Stephen M. Webb
Professional Free Software Developer

#14 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 27585

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 08:10 AM

Nobody has ever demonstrated to me what possible advantage I could gain by using an IDE.

That's because they're too scared to come down to the basement Posted Image

Seriously though, the features I appreciate the most would be:
* easy maintenance of your 'makefile': 3 clicks to add a new source file, two clicks to exclude a file from a particular build config, etc...
* working on multiple files at once via ctrl+tabbing, split window, etc...
* quick shortcuts for things like:
-- find text in project
-- find files by name (show me...?)
-- find symbol in project (where is...?)
-- find code that references a symbol (who uses...?)
-- go to symbol (alt+g how I love you)
* debugging, srlsly.
-- watch window to inspect and modify variables, including complex structs and arrays.
-- mouse-hover to inspect and modify variables, including complex structs and arrays.
-- watch window to execute/evaluatie arbitrary code statements (ability to interactively type C++ into a dialog while on a breakpoint and see the result)
-- ability to edit/recompile the program's code while it's running.
-- memory view to hex/float/decimal/etc inspect RAM/registers during debugging.
-- ability to drag the program counter to a specific line of code.
-- button for switching from viewing source, asm and mixed.
-- window for view multiple threads and ability to easily debug more than one at once.
-- ^having all of that on screen at once.

#15 Dragonion   Members   -  Reputation: 131

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 08:28 AM

I have encountered many disadvantages.

I know what you mean. Some time ago I decided to try out the Visual C++ 2010 IDE and made a simple Hello World program. Then, after having spend half an hour getting the project to compile because it was missing some files ("export/symbol definition files" or something like that), when I looked at the size of the project folder I was honestly shocked -- 50 MEGABYTES for a program writing one line in a console!! It turned out to be some Intelli-thingy that apparently created some very large files, which, after all, can be disabled. But still; waaay to much junk in that folder compared to a single makefile ;)

#16 Oberon_Command   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1795

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 08:36 AM

I have encountered many disadvantages.

I know what you mean. Some time ago I decided to try out the Visual C++ 2010 IDE and made a simple Hello World program. Then, after having spend half an hour getting the project to compile because it was missing some files ("export/symbol definition files" or something like that), when I looked at the size of the project folder I was honestly shocked -- 50 MEGABYTES for a program writing one line in a console!! It turned out to be some Intelli-thingy that apparently created some very large files, which, after all, can be disabled. But still; waaay to much junk in that folder compared to a single makefile ;)


Sounds like you messed something up. I can create and compile a hello world program in VC++ 2010 in less than two minutes.

- File->Project->New
- Select Empty Project
- Type name
- Click OK
- Right click on the project in the solution explorer, select Add->New Item
- Type in name
- Click OK
- Type in code
- Press F7
- Press Ctrl-F5 to run it.

In fact, if your machine isn't slow, that should take less than ONE minute, and most of the time would be spent typing in the code.

#17 Dragonion   Members   -  Reputation: 131

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 08:58 AM

I can do it in less than 30 seconds from my editor:

- Ctrl+N (make new file)
- Type code
- Ctrl+S (save file)
- Type file name
- F5 (compile)
- F7 (link)
- F8 (run)

Plus the only file created on my hard-drive is "hello.cpp" :P However, for me development time is more or less irrelevant ...

EDIT: And another great advantage: Unlike the Visual C++ IDE my editor has no boot-time :) (Even though development time is irrelevant, having fast and reliable tools certainly isn't)

EDIT2: Also I have another dev tool installed (Open Watcom) I use every once in a while for testing various compatibility issues, and if I want to build the file with this instead I simply use Shift+F5 and Shift+F7 instead :)

#18 Bregma   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4757

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 11:27 AM

stephenw@ariel:~/cv$ date
Wed Aug 17 13:18:29 EDT 2011
stephenw@ariel:~/cv$ cat >hello.c
#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
printf("hello world!\n");
return 0;
}
^D

stephenw@ariel:~/cv$ make hello
cc hello.c -o hello
stephenw@ariel:~/cv$ date
Wed Aug 17 13:19:07 EDT 2011
stephenw@ariel:~/cv$ ./hello
hello world!
stephenw@ariel:~/cv$ date
Wed Aug 17 13:19:13 EDT 2011
stephenw@ariel:~/cv$


If course, if I hadn't made some many typos it would have been faster. IDEs can only do so much in that respect, too.

Yeah, one wouldn't use cat for a real project. Why in the deep dark damp underworld would you use an IDE for a hello world project? Would you use a bazooka to kill a mosquito?
Stephen M. Webb
Professional Free Software Developer

#19 A Brain in a Vat   Members   -  Reputation: 313

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 11:41 AM

Nobody has ever demonstrated to me what possible advantage I could gain by using an IDE. I have encountered many disadvantages.


This is like saying "As a bike rider, nobody has ever demonstrated to me what possible advantage I could gain by using a car."

I'm not saying you should use an IDE. I often don't. I also don't own a car. But, although I can get anywhere by bike that I could by car, and although I detest cars and don't think their positives make up for their negatives, I can admit that there are positives.

Without an IDE you don't have the integration between your source and the debugger. Is this necessary? No, but it's nice. I use gdb all the time, but on certain projects it's nice to be able to visually place breakpoints while looking at my code.

Without an IDE you don't have automatic refactoring tools. Are these necessarY? No, but they're nice. They save a lot of time and headache, and let you focus on writing logic.

Without an IDE you don't have useful autocompletion, "go to definition", call hierarchy, etc.

Without an IDE you don't have a class-level view of your program that is integrated with your source.

Without an IDE you have to remember the locations of each of your files. This may not sound like a big deal, but those of us working in giant codebases don't want to spend lots of time searching through directories.

etc.

I respect your decision not to use an IDE, and I don't think it's a strange one, but you're intentionally closing your eyes if you don't realize that there are advantages (along with the disadvantages) to using an IDE.

#20 Bregma   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4757

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 12:18 PM


Nobody has ever demonstrated to me what possible advantage I could gain by using an IDE. I have encountered many disadvantages.

Without an IDE you don't have the integration between your source and the debugger. Is this necessary? No, but it's nice. I use gdb all the time, but on certain projects it's nice to be able to visually place breakpoints while looking at my code.

Without an IDE you don't have automatic refactoring tools. Are these necessarY? No, but they're nice. They save a lot of time and headache, and let you focus on writing logic.

Without an IDE you don't have useful autocompletion, "go to definition", call hierarchy, etc.

Without an IDE you don't have a class-level view of your program that is integrated with your source.

Without an IDE you have to remember the locations of each of your files. This may not sound like a big deal, but those of us working in giant codebases don't want to spend lots of time searching through directories.

Not a single one of those points require an IDE, unless you rephrase them to say "with an IDE, you cant ... in an IDE." So, I guess an IDE is kinda like a tautology. I can also create tautologies with an IDE, so again that's not an argument for their use.

I have tools that do all of the above. I do do all of the above. Well, not autocompletion, I don't like it, but my tools do it. And none of my tools are integrated with my source, because my source is in text files. An IDE is also not integrated with the source.
Stephen M. Webb
Professional Free Software Developer




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