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How can I get my Concept made into a Game?


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#1 KingLuke24   Members   -  Reputation: 133

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Posted 05 September 2011 - 04:54 PM

I have a game concept that I would like to find a team for to make it. But from what I have been informed of (read the '3D RPG Needs Team' thread in Help Wanted) it is very uncommon for a writer to simply find a team to make a game based off of his concept. So, what would be the best alternative route to finding a way to making my concept come to life. I have a very good feeling this could be a very big hit in the indie game industry (although I'm sure most all concept writers think that). :P
<----HammerTime!!!---->

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#2 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5470

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Posted 05 September 2011 - 05:00 PM

Nothing.

Sorry to be harsh, but there is a 99.99999% chance you are screwed.

When it comes to a beginners project at the initial stages, there are (up to) 4 main positions: programmers(always), artists(almost always), musicians(sometimes) and writers(occasionally).

Now, I will rank them in order of their priority and/or ability to shape the direction of the game:

programmers
artists
musicians
friends of the programmers
friends of the artists
friends of the musicians
first cousins, once removed
first cousins, twice removed
mailmen
well wishers
writers



My personal advice would be to bring something else to the table. My secondary advice would be to get published so your name has a certain cachet, in which case you can be a producer. That said, with the exception of Clive Barker, RA Salvatore and a few others, this is a very small list. Or you could become a producer, but in order to be a producer you need to have experience on a prior game... good luck figuring out that catch-22.



Oh, or cash. Paying people always helps.


Our very own Tom Sloper's siteis probably the best place for a non-programmer to figure out the path through the industry. Although I think he would probably concur you are just as screwed. :)

#3 KingLuke24   Members   -  Reputation: 133

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Posted 05 September 2011 - 05:11 PM

Well... I guess... Thanks for that, brutal honesty. :/ I am also a 3D level designer, but my skill in that isn't quite enough to make a decent world. And I am currently trying to learn Unreal Engine 3 but... It'll take a while.
<----HammerTime!!!---->

#4 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5470

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Posted 05 September 2011 - 05:19 PM

Well... I guess... Thanks for that, brutal honesty. :/ I am also a 3D level designer, but my skill in that isn't quite enough to make a decent world. And I am currently trying to learn Unreal Engine 3 but... It'll take a while.


Frankly, that is exactly where you should focus your development. Get to the point you can create 3D levels. If you can put together a couple levels that illustrate the idea you are trying to convey you will have a hell of a lot easier time recruiting people to work with you.

The simple reality is, everyone has the next brilliant idea, but programmers and artists out there have the ability to jump into a tool like Unity and bring their idea to fruition, so why would they spend time working on someone elses? However, success attracts others, so if you can design levels that illustrate your vision, you will be much more likely to attract more talent. Worst case scenario, you cannot attract others to implement your idea, the knowledge you have acquired will go that much further towards being able to implement it yourself.

Truth of the matter is, it will all take a while, a looooooooooong while. Thats perhaps the biggest downside to developing anything but the simplest of games. Games are hard, a ton of hard work with a ton of skills at use.

Think about it this way, many modern AAA games have teams of 100+ people working on them and often over 2 years development time, which represents over 200,000 man hours of effort. To say nothing of the many years those 100+ people spent in school, or on prior projects learning their trade, which if you factor that aspect in, represents literally MILLIONS of man hours of labour.




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