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Aurora's Shrine WIP (Feedback Requested)


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#1 KingLuke24   Members   -  Reputation: 133

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 03:23 PM

This is the first level (where the player will learn how to control the character) of my game Gidget: The Rebel Chronicles. The zone is a shrine for an angel named Aurora, who will guide Gidget through much of the game. This is where he first encounters her, and learns how to move, jump, and attack.
I have made several attempts at modeling it using the terrain compound object, but the cliff's would have no definition and would be too smoothly blended with the ground. So I tried a different technique: I modeled the cliff face off of a plane, and then created a second version to give more variety. I then modeled a single version of a water fall cliff face in the back. I then modeled a few cliff top's out of boxes, and used the terrain compound object now only for the sole purpose of creating the ground and the bottom of the pond. I used a plane to placehold where the water will be. I was going to create another cliff face for the entrance, but decided I would like a wall instead, to give it more of a secluded feeling. So I just made a box and stuck it there. I then modeled a few cornerstones to place at the intersection of the cliff faces, so that they weren't just planes next to planes. This really marked the completion of the modeling portion of the level. But I then noticed: the water fall cliff was nothing more than a straight chute which looked like a water slide. So, I modeled a few extra rocks, and placed them over it to give it a rocky appearance. All in all, it was a lot of plane and box modeling, with one terrain compound object, and there you have it. Just so you know, this is a WIP, and not the finished product. Still have to texture, animate, light, etc. I might also shift some things around a bit. Please comment. I would appreciate any advice on techniques or something you personally think would make this level better. Thank you, have a nice day. :)

Mistwood_Zone_0_untextured_1.jpg


Mistwood_Zone_0_untextured_2.jpg


Mistwood_Zone_0_untextured_3.jpg

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#2 KingLuke24   Members   -  Reputation: 133

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 01:54 PM

*Bump* Some basic textures and a hair & fur modifier for the grass. Nothin fancy. Still gotta put a wind morph on the grass, use a particle system for the waterfall, and I don't know how I'm going to animate the water yet. Still a WIP. Please comment, negative, positive, critique, anything. I want to get better. :)

mistwood_zone_0_basix_textured_1.jpg

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#3 Kryzon   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 3032

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 10:06 AM

Hi KingLuke24,

1. Did you use any reference while conceptualizing this environment? If you collect a lot of reference material of what you know will be in your environment before actually creating anything, you'll have the best guide possible for making your art look real. There are a few areas in that environment, like your waterfall for example, that don't look realistic in their structure. Rocks don't behave that way. Take a look:

Posted Image

Google Images can get you anywhere, so it's very valuable; also check if you have any kind of "nature photography" books lying around. They have some great shots for reference and most of the time we don't even remember we had a book like that.

2. Do you plan on using this environment in a game? if so, plenty of features will be lost. The Fur modifier for the grass, the particle system for the water, material settings and many other features that can't be transferred through standard model formats like .X or .OBJ.

3. There is a wealth of information to be taken from simply analyzing game scenes. Waterfalls, for instance, can be emulated with a static strip of polygons. This strip is then stochastically painted with varying vertex-alpha values so the waterfall "blends into" the rocks below it like in the picture above (look how important real-life reference can be). In the end this mesh is mapped in a certain way so it can receive a seamless water texture that will be constantly scrolled in one of the UV axes when in-game to convey the idea of streaming water.




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