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C# beginner game


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#1 phil67rpg   Members   -  Reputation: 767

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 07:02 PM

well I did a c# guessing game.I am wondering if tic tac toe would be the next logical step.

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#2 BeerNutts   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2944

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 07:59 PM

Just do it phil, you don't need us to hold your hand through this.
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#3 MrGuild   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 01:56 AM

Any step would be the logical step, through failure comes success and thats a promise, even if you handle a project that is to big for you you learn new things. Even if it's not to tackle projects to big for you. Personally it's what you feel gives you a challenge, and I mean this in a good way. If you feel it to be challenging don't panic just do... you will pick something up eventually or realize what your skill level is. BeerNutts is correct though you shouldn't be asking. The most vivid advice I can give you is DO

#4 NDraskovic   Members   -  Reputation: 190

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 03:37 AM

My "logical steps" were like this - I made a simple game (finding a path trough a "labyrinth"), then I tried to improve the movement and the control of the "agent", then I tried to improve the graphics, then I tried to make a more sophisticated labyrinth, and so on. My point is - think of a game (something not to restricted, but not to complicated either) then try to make a working version. Once you have it, think of ways to improve one or all aspects of your game and repeat this process until you think you learned enough to move to a new level of game complexity (then think of another, more complex, game and start the process all over again). This is a time consuming process - expect a lot of research trough forums/tutorials/code snippets, but you will have a strong sense of accomplishment each step of the way. I think that the idea of these forum(s) is not to lead you from a beginner to a professional, but rather to help you with details - you have a far greater chance of getting an answer if you ask about a specific problem (like "How do I... " questions) then asking about a whole game. Hope this helps, and don't get discouraged if (when :D) you fail, just keep pushing on.

#5 phil67rpg   Members   -  Reputation: 767

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 08:34 PM

well thanks for all the input.I am working on a tic tac toe game using c# and gdi+.I really like c# it is easy to work with.I am writing cleaner code with it.

#6 MrGuild   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 11:01 PM

That is very good to hear from you phill keep it up and never give up :D!!

#7 NDraskovic   Members   -  Reputation: 190

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 03:27 AM

I really like c# it is easy to work with.I am writing cleaner code with it.


In that case you might want to try XNA, it has the same syntax as C# and gives you a lot of predefined methods and data types that will make your life a bit easier - it provides the content pipeline so you don't have to define the way your content is being interpreted by the graphic card. This way you can focus on designing graphics or game logic, and see the results of your code almost immediately.




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