Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

A common question, where to begin?


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
11 replies to this topic

#1 PacmanPhrog   Members   -  Reputation: 99

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2012 - 06:14 PM

I know this is a very common question, but where do I begin? I've no knowledge of any programming languages, besides a little RGSS. I'd like to make RPGs at first, although I'm not sure if that helps. I'm sick of wishing I could make a game, I want to make my thoughts a reality. Not for money, or renown, but simply because I want a medium to weave words, stories, and entertainment upon. I'm 15, so why not start now? I've already made a few games in RPG maker VX that were quite nice, and took a small one semester class last year in my technology class for game maker. Sorry if I'm trailing off, but I have all this ambition, and the need to spill thoughts upon something, for others to see. Basically, all I'm asking for is a little point in the direction I need to go, I've looked up about C++, and I'm interested, or maybe Java? I will never get any formal education for this so to prove everyone and my family that doesn't believe I can do this, wrong, I'll need a little bit of help from you guys. I'd appreciate it if someone could help me out.

Sponsor:

#2 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5755

Like
3Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2012 - 06:22 PM

Just curious, but if it's a common question, why didn't you just go with one of the common answers?

Anyways, read this, it was written to answer exactly your question.


Your motives are a little dumbfounding, is your family actively saying you aren't capable of programming? Or are they saying you are wasting your time?

I am a bit confused too why at 15 you already state you wont get any formal education either; although frankly, you can still create a game without an education. Getting an industry job though, without a degree... not a good probability there.

#3 PacmanPhrog   Members   -  Reputation: 99

Like
-1Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2012 - 06:30 PM

Just curious, but if it's a common question, why didn't you just go with one of the common answers?

Anyways, read this, it was written to answer exactly your question.


Your motives are a little dumbfounding, is your family actively saying you aren't capable of programming? Or are they saying you are wasting your time?

I am a bit confused too why at 15 you already state you wont get any formal education either; although frankly, you can still create a game without an education. Getting an industry job though, without a degree... not a good probability there.

Whatever, that's not what I meant, I shouldn't whine about things on the internet, They say both. I know that I wont get any formal education for game development, so I have to learn independently, I should have explained better. I've accepted I wont get a degree, my grades are terrible, I hate public school in general, the entire enviroment.

#4 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5755

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2012 - 07:15 PM

I should have explained better. I've accepted I wont get a degree, my grades are terrible, I hate public school in general, the entire enviroment.



For fear of running off in a tangent; high school and university are so different as to be unbelievable. I hated hated high school with every ounce of my fibre, while university was some of the best days of my life. Additionally, at 15 you haven't closed any doors yet. Hell, at least in Ontario where I went to school, the only grades that actually mattered for university enrolment were our 5th ( now 4th ) year ( @ 17 years old ). My grades were laughably bad until the final year, as frankly, they didn't matter until then. Or you could go to (some) community college, where the requirements for admittance are the ability to fill your name on the dotted line, but if you make it through, that's enough to get you into the field.

#5 ZBethel   Members   -  Reputation: 603

Like
2Likes
Like

Posted 13 January 2012 - 09:41 AM


Just curious, but if it's a common question, why didn't you just go with one of the common answers?

Anyways, read this, it was written to answer exactly your question.


Your motives are a little dumbfounding, is your family actively saying you aren't capable of programming? Or are they saying you are wasting your time?

I am a bit confused too why at 15 you already state you wont get any formal education either; although frankly, you can still create a game without an education. Getting an industry job though, without a degree... not a good probability there.

Whatever, that's not what I meant, I shouldn't whine about things on the internet, They say both. I know that I wont get any formal education for game development, so I have to learn independently, I should have explained better. I've accepted I wont get a degree, my grades are terrible, I hate public school in general, the entire enviroment.


Don't shortchange yourself. It doesn't matter how "smart" you are, only how driven you are. I don't consider myself particularly brilliant--i.e., sometimes I'm a bit slow, but I'm driven and I work hard. Doing something to prove yourself is not a particularly good motive. If you stumble and fall you'll just end up doubting yourself and getting discouraged. A better motive is to pick a goal or something you want to achieve and then stay focused on that goal. If you look at all the successful and ambitious people in History, you'll see what I mean.

Like Serapth said, high school is quite a different environment from college. People go to high school because they have to. More often than not, people go to college because they want to. As a result, your peers tend to be more motivated (especially if they are paying for it themselves!). A bit of advice? You probably will not succeed in your dream unless you can train yourself to work hard in the midst of the crappy situation you're in right now. Game development is fun, but it's also really hard, and more often than not it requires some serious willpower to stay focused.

I got made fun of somewhat when I was starting, so I understand your desire to prove yourself. Ultimately though, this is about you, not what others think about you. You need to decide that you'll respect yourself enough to work hard in your studies before you can expect others to respect you. You're not "too far gone" in your education. One of my favorite films that shows this is October Sky. Homer Hickam is your average high school student with low grades and no drive in life. That all changes when he sees Sputnik flying across the sky. It's a great movie; you should watch it. It's one of my favorites because it encouraged me that if you work hard, anything is possible.

Hope that helps!

#6 Telastyn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3730

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 13 January 2012 - 10:17 AM

Don't shortchange yourself. It doesn't matter how "smart" you are, only how driven you are.


In reality both matter, but frankly doing bad at high school (in North America at least) means that you have neither or have other issues that need addressed first.

#7 coderx75   Members   -  Reputation: 406

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 13 January 2012 - 11:14 AM

In reality both matter, but frankly doing bad at high school (in North America at least) means that you have neither or have other issues that need addressed first.

I don't entirely disagree with you but I don't think it's entirely appropriate to tell someone that's got his own family putting him down that he has issues he has to deal with.

@Pacman, you're family's full of shit and High School is not a measure of you or your capabilities. You've already taken the initiative in making games with RPG Maker and seeking advice for further advancement. You're on your way. Take what ZBethel said to heart and follow that link that Serapth provided in his first reply.

Best of luck to you and I hope you find what you're looking for!

Quit screwin' around! - Brock Samson

#8 Telastyn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3730

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 13 January 2012 - 01:29 PM

I don't entirely disagree with you but I don't think it's entirely appropriate to tell someone that's got his own family putting him down that he has issues he has to deal with.


Ah yes, I didn't mean that. I mean more like Serapth's example where he didn't do well in high school due to hating the environment.

I did very poorly in college due to issues beyond my smarts or drive.

In the end, if you're intelligent or driven you should succeed in high school. Otherwise that should be taken as a sign for something to correct before becoming an adult and having it impact things far more challenging than high school.

#9 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5755

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 13 January 2012 - 02:48 PM


I don't entirely disagree with you but I don't think it's entirely appropriate to tell someone that's got his own family putting him down that he has issues he has to deal with.


Ah yes, I didn't mean that. I mean more like Serapth's example where he didn't do well in high school due to hating the environment.

I did very poorly in college due to issues beyond my smarts or drive.

In the end, if you're intelligent or driven you should succeed in high school. Otherwise that should be taken as a sign for something to correct before becoming an adult and having it impact things far more challenging than high school.



For the record, I didn't do well in high school because I didn't have to do well and I realized it early. I don't know about in the US, but in Canada, only your final year's average was used to determine university eligibility. So if you look at my grades I was a C-D student until final year, which I ended with a 89 average, which was sufficient for the school I wanted to attend. But then in my life, I have raised procrastination to an art form... I'll tell you about it later!



I did have to fight extremely hard to succeed that final year; as I have trouble taking instruction from people I don't respect. I can understand why certain people would have a great deal of difficulty getting through. That said, intelligence and perseverance are probably the two most important traits in a successful programmer, and equipped with both of those, you should be able to make it through high school, regardless to the level of contempt you hold for it.

#10 coderx75   Members   -  Reputation: 406

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 14 January 2012 - 03:56 AM

Anyone who says that procrastination is an art deserves a plus. Your grades were quite high to compared to mine. I didn't show up for most of a year of school and actually got a straight "F" report card. I failed the year, took an IQ test and they put me through to the next grade. I was told that this would be detrimental to my ability to function in any way for the rest of my life (they tell kids that in the US). The effect it had so far has been nothing. I left high school and have been kicking ass ever since. The US is a "funny" place. I'll just leave it at that. =b

Quit screwin' around! - Brock Samson

#11 Delphawi   Members   -  Reputation: 235

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 14 January 2012 - 10:35 AM

About the Original question .. 3DBuzz.com is the best friend for you , you will just need to sign up -free- and you can start with Unity or UDK lessons -I prefer Unity as a start-
They both are free Game Engines that made great games (Batman , BioShock ..) and you too can use them very easily .
Don't start with C++ all at once , or you will waste so much time .. it is good to learn programming and what happenes behined the scenes , but for a new game designer .. you don't have to reinvent the wheel :D !
Those few line are the summary of 3 years :) , and you still have time .
Also you must believe in yourself .. no matter how hard you work if you Believe that you gonna fail at the end :)

#12 wildbunny   Members   -  Reputation: 550

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 14 January 2012 - 02:13 PM

I know this is a very common question, but where do I begin?


I wrote an article recently that should fit the bill - its about the process of making a game, from design, prototyping, implementation, testing and release aimed at the absolute beginner:


http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/blog/2012/01/06/how-to-make-games/

Hope it helps!

Cheers, Paul.




Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS