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Have i choosed the right path for beginners?


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#1 rup123   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 10:58 PM

I want to desighn a RPG game and i am 17 years of age....
I choose C and C++ for my game..
First I already red "The Complete reference to C++" C part and then red c++part.(And i desighned text base RPG game)
Then ill also read the book "Object Oriented Programming with C++" to make the concept clear

Then ill learn DarkGDk(and desighn 2d RPG game) then ill study unity 3d and Ogre 3d and open GL and direct x to (desighn 3d RPG game)

And lastly ill desighn Advanced 3d RPG game.............
Thanx in advance ;)

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#2 Josh Petrie   Moderators   -  Reputation: 3100

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 11:21 PM

Do less reading, and more actual practice. No amount of reading books -- especially on C++ (a poor choice for a first language, I would have recommend Python or C#) will teach you everything you need to know. Much of programming is problem solving and to train that skill you need to try to work on actual problems. Write actual programs, even simple ones.

I wouldn't bother with the DarkGDK thing either.

Josh Petrie | Core Tools Engineer, 343i | Microsoft C++ MVP


#3 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 17725

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 12:00 AM

The path you've chosen will certainly work -- although as Josh has said, you should put more emphasis on writing code and less on reading.

C++ isn't the language most people around here would recommend, but given you've already started and are apparently making progress you may as well stick with it unless you're experiencing an undue amount of difficulty; while we would normally suggest C# or Python instead, there's no reason you can't learn with C++, and continuing on through difficulties is an important skill to develop.


To be honest, it doesn't really matter if you've picked "the right path" (and there is no definitive "best" way of going about learning to program games!) or even a particularly good path as long as you stick with it and keep learning new things. I'd say keep going -- as long as you're making sure to practice, practice, practice along the way amongst all that reading!


I also agree with Josh that I would probably skip the Dark GDK personally, but by all means give it a go if it's something that interests you; if you're looking for an alternative you could perhaps try a basic 2d library such as SFML or SDL.

Hope that helps! Posted Image

#4 rup123   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 01:33 AM

hmmm
I am getting no difficulties with C and C++..I found both of them very easy as i already knew java till some extend.............
I know the fundaments of OOP.I choosed C++ cause i will not only desighn game but also creates some software. Posted Image Posted ImagePosted Image


I already created Text base RPG and After learning little complicated language like C and c++ ill definitely will found other language easier
Cause maybe language changes but fundaments of OOP and programming will never ever change....

#5 rup123   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 01:34 AM

Do less reading, and more actual practice. No amount of reading books -- especially on C++ (a poor choice for a first language, I would have recommend Python or C#) will teach you everything you need to know. Much of programming is problem solving and to train that skill you need to try to work on actual problems. Write actual programs, even simple ones.

I wouldn't bother with the DarkGDK thing either.

Its not my first i knew java. :)

#6 compscialien   Members   -  Reputation: 104

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 07:17 AM

This is why I love it here in Virginia Tech's CS department. After your standard intro to "Blank" language courses, you get hit by "Problem Solving in CS" Example problem: A family wants more males than females, so they keep having children until they have a boy in which case they stop having children. (A) Will males outnumber females? (B) What is the ratio is male to females? I love this class. Shows what CS really is about! There's many different ways at solving this, just as there is different ways to program.

#7 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5261

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 09:35 AM

Um, that problem sample is unsolvable. They could have a boy straight away short circuiting everything. They could have 75 female children before their first boy. There is no set ratio.

EDIT: Why is it, btw, that people always seem to list their age? It isn't like you must by X years old to ride this ride. As the minimum age to be on an online forum is 13, which is well old enough to start programming and there is no ceiling age, there is absolutely no point in telling us your age. Not upset, or calling out the OP, just noticed it happens all the time and is for the most part, a completely redundant piece of information. Often it seems to be used as a bit of a crutch.

#8 BeerNutts   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2756

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 10:05 AM

This is why I love it here in Virginia Tech's CS department. After your standard intro to "Blank" language courses, you get hit by "Problem Solving in CS" Example problem: A family wants more males than females, so they keep having children until they have a boy in which case they stop having children. (A) Will males outnumber females? (B) What is the ratio is male to females? I love this class. Shows what CS really is about! There's many different ways at solving this, just as there is different ways to program.


That's not a CS problem, it's a statistics problem (or a combinatorics problem for the second one, although the answer could be infinite).

As for the OP, I'd suggest looking into a good 2D API set, like SFML. It will provide you with 2D graphics (with great features), audio, input, windows, and network.
My Gamedev Journal: 2D Game Making, the Easy Way

---(Old Blog, still has good info): 2dGameMaking
-----
"No one ever posts on that message board; it's too crowded." - Yoga Berra (sorta)

#9 Infernal-rk   Members   -  Reputation: 135

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 02:43 PM

understand containers,
understand pointers,
understand memory management/cleanup

nobody likes an unstable game. good or bad won't matter when it crashes alot.

#10 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 17725

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 12:55 AM

rup123: Sounds like what you're doing is working well for you -- keep going, you should do just fine!

This is why I love it here in Virginia Tech's CS department. After your standard intro to "Blank" language courses, you get hit by "Problem Solving in CS"

If you want to try more practice problems at home (and I would recommend it for anyone getting started or simply needing some practice, including the OP) you could take a look at Project Euler.
Posted Image




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