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question about GDC


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#1 turlisk   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 07:07 PM

Hey everyone,

I'm planning on attending GDC this year, I graduate from my two year degree in may, I'm making up some business cards to hand out that will have my portfolio on them. What type of title should I put on the business card? Would Student still be applicable as I am a student and looking for entry level work. Or should I put down something like Programmer since I am looking to get into programming?

Thanks!

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#2 ApochPiQ   Moderators   -  Reputation: 15084

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 07:11 PM

This thread from just down the page in this forum has some advice.

#3 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 9553

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 08:13 PM

This thread from just down the page in this forum has some advice.


Seconded.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#4 turlisk   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 05:10 PM

thanks, alot of good information in there, A quick question on that, if I haven't graduated yet (set to graduate in may) should I put that on the card so they know i'm still in college or should I leave that off and chat about it in person?

Also real quick i would like an opinion on what i plan on putting on the card, at the bottom of the card on both sides i will have my phone number and website for my portfolio. On the front side i plan on putting Entry Level Programmer for a title and doing a bullet list of my skills: C++, C#, Java, XNA, Unity, Unreal Engine, and Hero Engine

Does anyone think this would be a good approach to this?? If not what do you believe should be listed on a good business card?

#5 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 9553

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 07:47 PM

1. if I haven't graduated yet (set to graduate in may) should I put that on the card so they know i'm still in college
2. or should I leave that off and chat about it in person?
3. On the front side i plan on putting Entry Level Programmer for a title and doing a bullet list of my skills: C++, C#, Java, XNA, Unity, Unreal Engine, and Hero Engine
Does anyone think this would be a good approach to this??
4. If not what do you believe should be listed on a good business card?



1. No. Why bother? Would you also include your favorite color, whether you're a dog person or a cat person, and whether you've got a girlfriend or not? What I'm saying is, there's such a thing as TMI.

2. Only if asked. It's unlikely anybody is going to offer you a job. If they did, then you'd have to decide whether to take it or to continue your education. The bridge doesn't need to be crossed until it's smack dab in front of your face.

3. [Yawn] Sorry, there I go being snarky again. What I'm saying is, that's all factual, but unimaginative.

4. How about something creative and memorable? "Imperial Grand Designer of the Western Hemisphere" is a persona. "I actually like broccoli" is unique. (Copied and pasted from that other thread.)
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#6 Jake Gilla   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 12:49 AM

Hi, I'm the guy from the other thread. My business card now reads "Mostly just makes sandwiches" under my name if that helps any. Listing all that stuff is boring, and just looks bad on the card. I figure even if someone doesn't get the joke, they might tell me they need someone to make sandwiches at the studio.

#7 Washu   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 5001

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 01:00 AM

Your business card should be your introduction. It should be just as though we met in a cafe... "Hi, my name is Washu Hakubi. I represent Hakubi Applied Industries. You can reach me at: washu@scapecode.com." Too much information is just clutter, and also annoying. But too little information can get your card thrown out quite quickly, such as just having your name and contact information. That tells me nothing about you at all... It's ok to be funny on your business card too, a lot of the folks you meet at the GDC are developers and the like, not HR. So being funny on a business card is OK. Just don't stick stupid things on there... like math or programming jokes.

Its also important to realize that you will end up with a few hundred business cards from other people (assuming you socialize a lot) that you should follow up on in the weeks after the conference. That being said: Do not follow up immediately. Wait a few days before contacting the other party. This is partly because you don't know if they're even back in the office, and the other part is that its tiring being at a conference. To then be bugged immediately after the conference by someone you spoke to for MAYBE a minute is annoying.

If you're attending the main conference and get a chance to, speak to the speakers after their session. Be intelligent though and make sure you know the material. Your goal here isn't to get a job, its to get people to remember your name in a warm fuzzy way, rather than a cold irritated way. If you attend the GDC more than once, you'll find yourself meeting the same people over and over again. If you do, always take a moment to stop and say hi, even though they may not remember you.

In time the project grows, the ignorance of its devs it shows, with many a convoluted function, it plunges into deep compunction, the price of failure is high, Washu's mirth is nigh.
ScapeCode - Blog | SlimDX


#8 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 9553

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 08:43 AM

Hi, I'm the guy from the other thread. My business card now reads "Mostly just makes sandwiches" under my name if that helps any. Listing all that stuff is boring, and just looks bad on the card. I figure even if someone doesn't get the joke, they might tell me they need someone to make sandwiches at the studio.


I love it! Posted Image
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#9 L. Spiro   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 13292

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 04:03 PM

You do have the option of making more than one card.

If you feel confident in your ability to read people, you may feel more inclined to give one card to him or her rather than the other.


3. On the front side i plan on putting Entry Level Programmer for a title and doing a bullet list of my skills: C++, C#, Java, XNA, Unity, Unreal Engine, and Hero Engine
Does anyone think this would be a good approach to this??

It comes off to me as a sneaky attempt to get a job, at which point I would try to end the conversation as politely but hastily as possible and discard your card when you are not looking.

Show some tact. If you want a job, send a résumé.
If you want a job through networking at a convention, leave people with the impression that you are a confident, stable, self-secure—but not self-centered/arrogant—person who is NOT looking for a job, and then send a résumé, if the contact seems inviting in such a manner.

Giving people the impression you are talking to them only because you are trying to get an advantage towards getting into their companies does not impress anyone, and generally makes them uninterested.
I would rather hire someone who just makes sandwiches, so make it your first priority not to make it known that you are looking for a job, until someone specifically takes the conversation down that road after you have impressed him or her via your general verbal skills, confidence, and knowledge of the field.


L. Spiro
It is amazing how often people try to be unique, and yet they are always trying to make others be like them. - L. Spiro 2011
I spent most of my life learning the courage it takes to go out and get what I want. Now that I have it, I am not sure exactly what it is that I want. - L. Spiro 2013
I went to my local Subway once to find some guy yelling at the staff. When someone finally came to take my order and asked, “May I help you?”, I replied, “Yeah, I’ll have one asshole to go.”
L. Spiro Engine: http://lspiroengine.com
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