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Multiple development PC's


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#1 RanBlade   Members   -  Reputation: 648

Posted 29 February 2012 - 05:18 PM

Does anyone else have a need to do there work on separate PC's? And if so what medium do you use for your files "synced". dropbox? simply use SVN? usb drive?

Eric Ranaldi a.k.a RanBlade

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#2 Luckless   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1832

Posted 29 February 2012 - 06:12 PM

I've been using Unison for syncing up my writing projects, but so far I haven't needed to sync a lot in the realm of code. I tend to do small prototypes of a problem in isolation from my main development rig, and then manually weave it into a project after.
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#3 RanBlade   Members   -  Reputation: 648

Posted 29 February 2012 - 06:18 PM

and then manually weave it into a project after


Not a bad idea. I've never been good at working like that. maybe my skills should be refined.

Eric Ranaldi a.k.a RanBlade

"Passion is what drives you to stay up until 4am fixing that bug that hardly anyone would notice...

Passion is where great games come from, if you dont live and breathe games you shouldn't be in the games industry."

- Dave Pottinger, Ensemble Studios


[GameDev][C++ Page][Unity Game Engine][Panda3D Game Engine][NeHe Productions][Drunken Hyena][MSDN][Beej's Guide to Network Programming]

[FreedBSD][My Site][Gamasutra][Khan Acadamey]


#4 Luckless   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1832

Posted 29 February 2012 - 06:25 PM

The only thing I do on my netbook (code wise) is writing small snippets of stuff to solve little sub problems. Honestly I don't find it is that much of a step up from working out a solution to a problem on paper, and will still need fine tuning of things before can be added to an actual project.

I honestly don't consider myself a great developer, and any suggestions I give on development should be taken with a grain of salt. Possibly one you would consider offering a herd of horses.
Old Username: Talroth
If your signature on a web forum takes up more space than your average post, then you are doing things wrong.

#5 RanBlade   Members   -  Reputation: 648

Posted 29 February 2012 - 06:36 PM

I asked for the method others used :). I guess a little more backstory on me is I go back and forth between my laptop and PC depending on what my kids are doing. Also there is days/months I end up only having my laptop with me on the job so while I am home with both my systems your method may work out for me. I just prefer to have my whole code base for testing if i finish a system or implement a feature i want to make sure something works.

But I digress all i really asked for was info on what other people did so thx for that.

Eric Ranaldi a.k.a RanBlade

"Passion is what drives you to stay up until 4am fixing that bug that hardly anyone would notice...

Passion is where great games come from, if you dont live and breathe games you shouldn't be in the games industry."

- Dave Pottinger, Ensemble Studios


[GameDev][C++ Page][Unity Game Engine][Panda3D Game Engine][NeHe Productions][Drunken Hyena][MSDN][Beej's Guide to Network Programming]

[FreedBSD][My Site][Gamasutra][Khan Acadamey]


#6 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 30926

Posted 29 February 2012 - 07:23 PM

To share code between my laptop and desktop, I use git.
On both PC's, I've shared the folder containing the code (i.e. containing the git repo) and mapped it on the other PC as network drive "x:\".
Then whenever I want to grab changes from the other machine, I can use git fetch file://x: , which pulls over the commits from the other PC into the local repo.

#7 alnite   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2123

Posted 29 February 2012 - 07:57 PM

I have used SVN, though I'd try to avoid that as I have to make sure that the development tools I have between PCs match.

#8 tstrimple   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1723

Posted 29 February 2012 - 08:42 PM

Git + Github + Dropbox and occasionally Cloud9. I work on projects on work laptop, personal laptop or on my macbook air and everything is in sync.

#9 Koobazaur   Members   -  Reputation: 691

Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:23 PM

I use SVN with my projects and it works great for synching, but I dont switch PCs often so the main reason I use it is because I will, invariably, mess my code up beyond all recognition when refactoring and having that instant "revert" function saved my back on more than one occasion

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#10 jjd   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2110

Posted 01 March 2012 - 05:48 AM

I use git. I always create a git repo to do whatever work I am doing simply for revision purposes. If I want to work on the project from other machines I clone the repo to my server. If I want to share the repo with others, I then clone it into a repo managed by gitosis on my server. If I want to 'put it out there' I clone it to github.

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#11 mdwh   Members   -  Reputation: 889

Posted 01 March 2012 - 08:58 AM

When I use my Samsung N220 netbook at home, I just access the desktop across the network (mapping a network drive just in case any software I'm using doesn't like filenames across a network). Admittedly I should probably get round to doing this with some kind of source control though...
http://erebusrpg.sourceforge.net/ - Erebus, Open Source RPG for Windows/Linux/Android
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/mark.harman/conquests.html - Conquests, Open Source Civ-like Game for Windows/Linux

#12 tstrimple   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1723

Posted 01 March 2012 - 11:25 AM

I use git. I always create a git repo to do whatever work I am doing simply for revision purposes. If I want to work on the project from other machines I clone the repo to my server. If I want to share the repo with others, I then clone it into a repo managed by gitosis on my server. If I want to 'put it out there' I clone it to github.

Yes, I am a git fanboy Posted Image


Git rocks! I find it amazing that so many people are still using SVN, there is no way I could go back to that. On a side project I'm working on, they are using TFS and I'm about ready to open my wrists.

#13 samoth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4912

Posted 01 March 2012 - 12:24 PM

Git rocks! I find it amazing that so many people are still using SVN

That may be true if you develop under Linux, but less so under Windows. I concede that maybe I'm just too stupid to get it working... but in my opinion, Git totally sucks ass under Windows, compared to Subversion.

The commandline version of Subversion installs in 5 seconds, a sophisticated Explorer-context GUI client installs in 5 seconds likewise. Both work perfectly well and reliably. You have your repo set up another 5 seconds later without reading a manual.
msys-git takes an hour to install and 190 MiB of disk space, which frankly is a total SNAFU for some little tool that does revision control. Yes, I know that there is a technical reason for this, but for the net result, it does not matter. As an end-user (which I am in this case), I'm interested in the result, not in excuses.

Plus, neither TortoiseGit nor any other GUI client that I've tried works nearly as well as TortoiseSVN. Yes, I know, real programmers are happy with commandline tools. Fine, good for them, but I want a seamless integration into Explorer and into my IDE. Such trivial stuff just has to work, and it has to work well and without trouble. It's not 1975 any more, after all.

Like I said, this may very well be the opposite under Linux, but if you need to work under Windows (like most people), my opinion is that Git is not all that great and its often praised "advantages" are exaggerated at best, or entirely false (many "git is so great" articles that you find on the internet compare apples and oranges, out of ignorance).

#14 alnite   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2123

Posted 01 March 2012 - 01:23 PM


Git rocks! I find it amazing that so many people are still using SVN

That may be true if you develop under Linux, but less so under Windows. I concede that maybe I'm just too stupid to get it working... but in my opinion, Git totally sucks ass under Windows, compared to Subversion.

The commandline version of Subversion installs in 5 seconds, a sophisticated Explorer-context GUI client installs in 5 seconds likewise. Both work perfectly well and reliably. You have your repo set up another 5 seconds later without reading a manual.
msys-git takes an hour to install and 190 MiB of disk space, which frankly is a total SNAFU for some little tool that does revision control. Yes, I know that there is a technical reason for this, but for the net result, it does not matter. As an end-user (which I am in this case), I'm interested in the result, not in excuses.

Plus, neither TortoiseGit nor any other GUI client that I've tried works nearly as well as TortoiseSVN. Yes, I know, real programmers are happy with commandline tools. Fine, good for them, but I want a seamless integration into Explorer and into my IDE. Such trivial stuff just has to work, and it has to work well and without trouble. It's not 1975 any more, after all.

Like I said, this may very well be the opposite under Linux, but if you need to work under Windows (like most people), my opinion is that Git is not all that great and its often praised "advantages" are exaggerated at best, or entirely false (many "git is so great" articles that you find on the internet compare apples and oranges, out of ignorance).


I agree with this. There are times when command line is better, but there are times when a GUI tools is preferable. Comparing revisions, resolving conflicts are better done on a GUI with side-to-side comparison. It's preferable to have such tools integrated with revision control.

Git is certainly better than svn, but svn (on Windows) has better tools.

#15 tstrimple   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1723

Posted 01 March 2012 - 01:25 PM


Git rocks! I find it amazing that so many people are still using SVN

That may be true if you develop under Linux, but less so under Windows. I concede that maybe I'm just too stupid to get it working... but in my opinion, Git totally sucks ass under Windows, compared to Subversion.

The commandline version of Subversion installs in 5 seconds, a sophisticated Explorer-context GUI client installs in 5 seconds likewise. Both work perfectly well and reliably. You have your repo set up another 5 seconds later without reading a manual.
msys-git takes an hour to install and 190 MiB of disk space, which frankly is a total SNAFU for some little tool that does revision control. Yes, I know that there is a technical reason for this, but for the net result, it does not matter. As an end-user (which I am in this case), I'm interested in the result, not in excuses.

Plus, neither TortoiseGit nor any other GUI client that I've tried works nearly as well as TortoiseSVN. Yes, I know, real programmers are happy with commandline tools. Fine, good for them, but I want a seamless integration into Explorer and into my IDE. Such trivial stuff just has to work, and it has to work well and without trouble. It's not 1975 any more, after all.

Like I said, this may very well be the opposite under Linux, but if you need to work under Windows (like most people), my opinion is that Git is not all that great and its often praised "advantages" are exaggerated at best, or entirely false (many "git is so great" articles that you find on the internet compare apples and oranges, out of ignorance).


Your arguments may have been valid a couple years ago, but git under Windows has substantially improved since then. The fact that you're talking about msys-git (an installer for compiling git on Windows) and not Git for Windows shows you haven't looked at things in a while. In addition it is hardly fair to say TortoiseGit doesn't work nearly as well as TortoiseSVN without listing specific grievances. I have personally used TortoiseGit for months now without any issues at all. There are of course more options and commands in TortoiseGit than TortoiseSVN, but there has to be because it is a far more powerful tool.

#16 tstrimple   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1723

Posted 01 March 2012 - 01:25 PM

Git is certainly better than svn, but svn (on Windows) has better tools.


Prove it. What can you do with SVN gui tools that you cannot with Git gui tools.

#17 kordova   Members   -  Reputation: 138

Posted 02 March 2012 - 07:13 AM

I use git. I always create a git repo to do whatever work I am doing simply for revision purposes. If I want to work on the project from other machines I clone the repo to my server. If I want to share the repo with others, I then clone it into a repo managed by gitosis on my server. If I want to 'put it out there' I clone it to github. Yes, I am a git fanboy Posted Image

Git rocks! I find it amazing that so many people are still using SVN, there is no way I could go back to that.

Partial clone by path (not possible in git, as far as I know). Checking in 500Mb+ binaries.

To answer the original question, I use various combinations of git, svn, network shares and rsync.

#18 Josh Petrie   Moderators   -  Reputation: 3177

Posted 02 March 2012 - 03:12 PM

I use mercurial or git (I prefer mercurial) for code, or svn if I have to. Dropbox syncs my dotfiles and configurations and such.

Josh Petrie | Game Developer, Undead Labs


#19 kordova   Members   -  Reputation: 138

Posted 04 March 2012 - 10:44 AM

I use mercurial or git (I prefer mercurial) for code, or svn if I have to. Dropbox syncs my dotfiles and configurations and such.

Why not mercurial or git for dotfile/config as well? I've been using git for that with great results.

#20 tstrimple   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1723

Posted 04 March 2012 - 12:46 PM


I use mercurial or git (I prefer mercurial) for code, or svn if I have to. Dropbox syncs my dotfiles and configurations and such.

Why not mercurial or git for dotfile/config as well? I've been using git for that with great results.


I've been pushing a lot of my code to github and dot/config files often contain sensitive data which you don't want persisted publicly. Throw in the fact that config files will often have different values depending on where they are pushed (local dev, staging, production) I find it useful to have a different mechanism to make sure those config files are correct. This enables me to simply git push to different environments without worrying about blowing out the config files with my local dev values.




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