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1>LINK : fatal error LNK1104: cannot open file 'd3dx9.lib'; should I be using DX9?


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#1 Akashi   Members   -  Reputation: 268

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 05:39 PM

I am being studious and everything so I thought that I'd do this the old-fashioned way before the Google mentality of "if you can't find it within the first three minutes, it doesn't exist" and joined a forum. Hello everyone! I hope I can get acquainted with you guys and get some help along the way and vise versa. Before I give you my problem, I'd like to ask if DirectX9 is the best thing to use. My book is outdated and I don't particularly want to muck through trying out DX10+ until I get better at DirectX in general and I know the transition is smooth and/or worth it.

I'll organize this post so this thread isn't cluttered and unattractive. I know some topics get dropped just because people don't format their code in a way that's easy to look through. Also, I am using a Windows 7 machine.

How experienced am I?:
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What is the problem?:
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What steps have I taken so far to try and solve it?:
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What is my code?:
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Hopefully I was descriptive as possible!

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#2 Akashi   Members   -  Reputation: 268

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 07:29 PM

Well, I Googled a bunch more (took a few hours) and I finally found the solution. Turns out I also had to go to Library Directories and add in the x86 folder of my SDK's Lib folder, like so. (x64 if it's a higher-end machine apparently?)

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After seeing infuriatingly unspecific responses to problems, I would hope this helps other people out in the future. :x

Now all I have to do is figure out how to make my program not close immediately. ):

#3 mhagain   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8171

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 08:21 PM

Regarding your other question - no reason not to jump straight to D3D11 (I'd advise skipping 10 - if you need to run on downlevel hardware you can accomplish this in 11 via feature levels). D3D9 is rather old and contains quite a bit of legacy cruft that will make things a little painful (lost devices, I'm looking at you in particular) whereas 11 is nice and clean and modern. Yes, the initialization code can look scary, but it's very front-loaded in initialization and object-creation; once you get over those 2 humps actually drawing stuff is shockingly simple.

The main downside to 11 is that the quality of the SDK documentation is nowhere near up to the same standard as that for 9 or 10; there were still some quite basic errors in it for a long time that were only corrected in the most recent versions (CopySubresourceRegion, I'm looking at you in particular). Arm yourself with a good book - like Frank Luna's - and you shouldn't go too far wrong.

It appears that the gentleman thought C++ was extremely difficult and he was overjoyed that the machine was absorbing it; he understood that good C++ is difficult but the best C++ is well-nigh unintelligible.


#4 Akashi   Members   -  Reputation: 268

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 08:52 AM

Would I need to change any of my code in order to adapt to D3D11 or can I just change the header files and library files and not have a problem? As far as you know?




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