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What do you do with a scientific computing / simulation and modeling type degree?


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#1 DevLiquidKnight   Members   -  Reputation: 834

Posted 24 March 2012 - 08:46 PM

I was wondering if anyone here has done a degree in scientific computing, areas such as high performance computing, or computer simulation and modeling? I'm thinking more on the lines of a master degrees here.

For example I know Georgia Tech has a degree in Computational Science and Engineering and Stanford has a degree in computational science and mathematical engineering. But Their also degrees such as a degree in: "engineering in simulation modeling"

If anyone can provide some insight what do you do with these degrees? What type of jobs are out their?

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#2 Eelco   Members   -  Reputation: 301

Posted 25 March 2012 - 03:56 AM

Thats essentially the degree I have, and the field I work in. Being good in computer science and mathematics is never a bad career move, but finding work in this field specifically is not that easy. If mean, you may find yourself a job as an app developer, but if you want to work in your field, its likely you will have to relocate, since most jobs are concentrated in various tech-hubs.

Im not sure as to your question 'what do you do with these degrees'. Modeling and simulation; programming and mathematics, obviously. That can be anything, from engineering to financial to scientific research. Not sure how to explain it in more detail.

#3 WavyVirus   Members   -  Reputation: 735

Posted 25 March 2012 - 05:08 AM

There are lots of areas where this is applicable.

Much of the activity in this scientific computation is connected to academic research - contributing to diverse fields such as astrophysics, biology/medicine and atmospheric modelling.

There are also industrial applications - for example, computational fluid dynamics is important in the the aerospace, automotive and oil industries for modelling aeroplanes, engines and oil pipelines.

Some companies produce and sell software products which involve this type of simulation - software to model airflow for data centre design, for example.




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