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2D vs 3D and some other newbie questions


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#1 Mojoman   Members   -  Reputation: 102

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 09:34 PM

Hi all,

This is my first post - I hope it's in the right section!

My friend (a 3D artist/animation student) and I have made a pact to try and break into the gaming industry. We've got an idea for a social/educational game that we're really excited about, and we're busy putting together a GDD and some concept art. The game will be about city-building and population management in a sci-fi/fantasy environment, and will also feature some simple combat elements. (pve and pvp)

What is concerning me at the moment is time considerations. We're obviously a very small operation as we're just starting out, and we want to make our first project too hard for ourselves. My question is this: from a programming perspective, is it neccessarily more time-consuming to code a 3D game than it is to code a 2D game?

Some other newbie questions:
- I'm confused by isometric games. Are they 2D, 3D, or can they be both?
- How long do simple, farmville-style social games take (on average) to build?
- Do we need a programmer for this project, or are there any easy-to use game-building programs that we can input our own content/graphics into?

Sorry about the flagrant, infuriating newbishness on display here. Posted Image I would be eternally grateful for any help!

Sponsor:

#2 Inukai   Members   -  Reputation: 1297

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 02:15 AM

Hi Mojoman

My question is this: from a programming perspective, is it neccessarily more time-consuming to code a 3D game than it is to code a 2D game?


Yes it is.(unless you use some kind of editor/game maker/etc software)

How long do simple, farmville-style social games take (on average) to build?


If you know how to it, would say around a year.

Do we need a programmer for this project, or are there any easy-to use game-building programs that we can input our own content/graphics into?


Wait, you got no experiences in programming? Well, there are some editors/game makers/etc, but I wouldn't recommend them, because you want to break into the game industry. You could try to make some easy Flash-games, which are quite easy to program. I don't think that you would find a programmer who would join you to create YOUR idea. If you really want to break into the industry, you should join an existing group, because artists are ALWAYS wanted.

#3 Satharis   Members   -  Reputation: 1064

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 06:18 AM

So wait are you an artist too? What are you specifically? Either way what it comes down to is the fact you're going to have to find a programmer to work with if you want to create any sort of "actual" game, using this project as a way to get into the industry just means you really need to make something decent.

If you're artists you might be better off just making art, use a pre-exsting game and make art for it, or find a team. Are you a designer? Unfortunately being a "designer" by itself is about the hardest job there is to create a portfolio for, people don't hire folks with just design ideas, anyone can do that. At the very least if you want to show off your design skill you'd really have to take the reins and play another role as well, rather that be a producer cobbling together a programmer and any other team members you need, or finding someone that -can- do that.

#4 www.gamegugu.com   Members   -  Reputation: 73

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 09:09 PM

find a programmer, then maybe our products can help you to complete your project, they are a kind of smart and easy using modeling tool and a game engine, visit our website : www.gamegugu.com to get more informations.

#5 MotorBully   Members   -  Reputation: 144

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 03:54 AM

Yeah,Satharis's word was quite right.To be a modest person,and you will get a wide road to walk on. But if you have nothing special , i suggest you 头learn more.When you make some good friend who is good at what you sign,you can try it.

#6 Mojoman   Members   -  Reputation: 102

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 07:33 PM

Thanks a lot for the help guys, I really appreciate it.

To clarify, we aren't looking to be hired, and we're prepared to cobble a team together if needs be. Neither of us like the idea of working on a project other than this (I guess "breaking in" was the wrong phrase, sorry.) It'll be hard, but I guess we'll have to try and find a programmer.

Thanks again!

#7 Lauris Kaplinski   Members   -  Reputation: 841

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 04:53 AM

- I'm confused by isometric games. Are they 2D, 3D, or can they be both?

Isometric projection is one kind of 3D projection to 2D surface, the other being perspective projection. So in theory isometric games are 3D.
Now isometric projection does not have perspective - i.e. all objects appear the same size, regardless of distance. Also, if you do not plan to allow changing of camera angle, all objects ALWAYS appear the same. Thus it is possible to render isometric world with 2D tileset and sprites - and it is often done that way.
Whether it is actually easier to do it in 2D or 3D depends on many factors.
Lauris Kaplinski

First technology demo of my game Shinya is out: http://lauris.kaplinski.com/shinya
Khayyam 3D - a freeware poser and scene builder application: http://khayyam.kaplinski.com/

#8 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 19064

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 05:11 AM

I'd suggest taking a look at Unity3d, which will give you a solid foundation towards your game without having to start from scratch. It has great documentation, plenty of examples, and a helpful and active community. You'll also be able to use your friend's 3d artwork rather than having to learn to create 2d instead. You can also produce a stand-alone executable or run it in a web-browser -- or if you're willing to buy a more expensive licence can even target Android or iOS.

#9 Abion47   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 03:07 PM

I'd suggest taking a look at Unity3d, which will give you a solid foundation towards your game without having to start from scratch. It has great documentation, plenty of examples, and a helpful and active community. You'll also be able to use your friend's 3d artwork rather than having to learn to create 2d instead. You can also produce a stand-alone executable or run it in a web-browser -- or if you're willing to buy a more expensive licence can even target Android or iOS.


Unity is actually a good choice. It is very powerul, very flexible, very beginner-friendly, and very inexpensive. The basic package is completely free to use in both personal and commercial projects without charging monthly fees or royalties. In fact, it currently has a promotion going on until the 8th that you can get iOS and Android licenses completely free! Seriously - go check out the prices for those licenses at the store. No trial time, no subscription, no royalties, nothing! I have a couple of friends that are Unity enthusiasts that have confirmed that this is the real deal.

Also, if you are interested, the Unity team has semi-periodic online courses that help teach you a lot of the basics. These are also free, and you can just show up and leave whenever (seating is limited, however). The next ones are tonight and on Wednesday. More info: http://unity3d.com/support/online-training/




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