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#1 scrap   Members   -  Reputation: 140

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 05:34 AM

i have really crappy cards now that wont let me run XNA programs... what do i need? it dont have to be the cheapest, something pretty good but not overly expensive. i want a dual card for sure. just wondering what card would be best?

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#2 jischneider   Members   -  Reputation: 252

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 07:22 AM

XNA 4 requires a DX10 GPU therefore any GPU in the market should be ok. In this generation AMD and NVIDIA are very balanced, both have good GPUs.

Don’t buy a GPU for the amount of the memory, instead look something like the number of stream processors (5 AMD stream processors equals (more or less) 1 NVIDIA stream processor), the bandwidth of the memory interface, reviews, benchmarks, etc.

Project page: < XNA FINAL Engine >


#3 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 9281

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 08:06 AM

XNA 4 requires a DX10 GPU

Are you sure on this? Pretty sure XNA is limited to DirectX 9 because of the XBox compatibility.

Don't buy dual GPU's because it doesn't make sense if you didn't build your computer for it (dual GPU's require a particular motherboard to get the most out of them, which implies buying a new motherboard, and possibly a new CPU, and then two graphics cards produce more heat which will require you to add more fans to dissipate temperature). And besides, you probably don't need two of them to do XNA work (unless you also want to play the latest games, in which case... up to you).

It really depends on your budget, there are crappy XNA-compatible GPU's for as cheap as $50 USD, but the decent ones are between $150 and $200. Over that you get the mainstream cards $200 - $300 and the ones above that are the expensive, top of the line ones.

It wouldn't hurt to buy a DirectX 10 GPU though if you ever intend to move beyond XNA (besides, DirectX 9 is going down and you can expect it to be deprecated in 2-3 years).

I personally recommend the HD6950 (obtainable in 1GB or 2GB versions, the price difference is tiny so I suggest go for the 2GB), or the GTX 560 Ti. They are fairly mainstream and are not too cheap but not too expensive either, and will last you long (they support DX11). If you're got more money to spend than that, you can go for the next step up, the HD6990 (really expensive), or the GTX 580 (really expensive too).

Whatever you do, do not buy an AGP graphics card. It's quite possible your motherboard doesn't support that (it's a fairly old standard) and you will kick yourself if you buy an incompatible graphics card.

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#4 jischneider   Members   -  Reputation: 252

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 08:22 AM

XNA 4 requires a DX10 GPU

Are you sure on this? Pretty sure XNA is limited to DirectX 9 because of the XBox compatibility.


XNA 4 requires a DX10 GPU for HiDef profile, and DX9 for Reach. (http://blogs.msdn.co...h-vs-hidef.aspx)

DX10 standardized several hardware incompatibilities, like filtering in floating point textures. When XNA 4 was developed DX 9 GPUs were losing their presence, so it was a good call.

Project page: < XNA FINAL Engine >





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