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Quick Eazy Question,


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Posted 05 October 2001 - 04:19 PM

What is the difference (in VC++) between float and GLfloat? I know that the values are the same, but does GLfloat get calculated with hardware or what? I mean, I dont see a point in having two variable types that do the same thing! thx

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Posted 05 October 2001 - 04:30 PM

typedef float GLfloat;
They are the same - on this particular architecture and this particular compiler. But they aren''t guaranteed to be the same everywhere else.

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Posted 05 October 2001 - 04:31 PM

They''re the same, but I dont know the reason why.

Just remember that all through the C language there are identical types with different names. char, byte and bool are all a single byte as well

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Posted 05 October 2001 - 04:54 PM

Yeah, and what about when your making functions, like:

void Render();

sometimes I see:

GLvoid Render();

Whats up with that? And GLint... just structures holding a int/whatever it may be?

"He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster... when you gaze long into the abyss, the abyss also gazes into you..."~Friedrich Nietzsche

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Posted 05 October 2001 - 05:35 PM

so, should I use float or GLfloat?
does it make a difference?
is one more efficient?
does one get calculated on the GFX card as opposed to the processor?
hmm, well if u can answer, thn thx!


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Posted 05 October 2001 - 05:35 PM

so, should I use float or GLfloat?
does it make a difference?
is one more efficient?
does one get calculated on the GFX card as opposed to the processor?
hmm, well if u can answer, thn thx!


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Posted 05 October 2001 - 05:42 PM

Use GLfloat. There is absolutely no difference in performance, but you will ensure your code will remain portable.

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Posted 06 October 2001 - 08:24 PM

I see, thanks.
I dont need portability, but at least I know why its there.
I thought that mabey GLfloats were calculated by the hardware,
that would take the math load off hte processor, thadda be sweet!
but I guess thats something for the future of Geforce 3 eh?


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Posted 06 October 2001 - 09:23 PM

quote:
Original post by Martee
Use GLfloat. There is absolutely no difference in performance, but you will ensure your code will remain portable.


As long as you''re using C++, GLfloat will be no more portable than float.


#10 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   

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Posted 07 October 2001 - 08:34 PM

quote by masonium: As long as you''re using C++, GLfloat will be no more portable than float.

Actually the purpose is developmental portability. There might be a difference between Borland C++''s definition of int, and Visual C++''s definition of int, so the designers of OpenGL decided to make it easier for it''s users to develop using different compilers. Really a good idea given how many people develop over the internet.

-Brent Robinson




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