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Looking for Directions


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#1 HybridWave   Members   -  Reputation: 105

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 10:14 PM

Hello all. So lately I've been scouring the Internet, jumping between forums, blogs, and dedicated websites in pursuit of more game design knowledge. I just finished Jesse Schelle's The Art of Game Design, and I need more. Any advice on what or who I should read next? Are there some books out there that focus on more on designing specific parts rather than the whole?

I've also got a gridpaper notebook in which I've been filling level designs, mechanic tables, some rudimentary character art, and game concepts. I know I'm grasping the concepts, but I need more. Thank you for your help.

Sponsor:

#2 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10179

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 10:37 PM

More books on game design: http://sloperama.com/advice/lesson8.htm
About Game Design Documents: http://sloperama.com/advice/specs.htm
And some game design tips: http://sloperama.com/advice/lesson13.htm
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#3 HybridWave   Members   -  Reputation: 105

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 12:02 AM

Thank you!

#4 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 19453

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 12:16 AM

You might also be interested in "The Designer's Notebook" columns, and Lost Garden. You might also enjoy the article "Evolutionary Design: A practical process for creating great game designs".

I've also got a gridpaper notebook in which I've been filling level designs, mechanic tables, some rudimentary character art, and game concepts. I know I'm grasping the concepts, but I need more.

Great! You would probably benefit from working on some complete (even if simple) game designs as well; you might consider creating board games, card games, or using Game Maker (or any similar software) to create simple PC games without programming. You might also consider giving your level design skills a work-out by using an editor provided with a commercial game you own to produce your own maps.

Reading about design -- especially from a variety of authoritative sources -- is great, but it's no substitute for practical experience.


Hope that's helpful! Posted Image

#5 Malabyte   Members   -  Reputation: 589

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 01:03 AM

@ Tom Sloper: Bookmarked! +1

- Awl you're base are belong me! -

- I don't know, I'm just a noob -


#6 HybridWave   Members   -  Reputation: 105

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 04:39 PM

That's awesome. Thanks for that. But I'm also wanting to expand my skill set with actual programming. Where's a good place to start there? I bought the Programming for Dummies book, which has Liberty Basic. Is there a better starting language?

#7 AdrianC   Members   -  Reputation: 602

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 05:34 PM

Liberty Basic? I would go with something that's more popular. C# or Python are probably your best bet.

#8 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10179

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 07:04 PM

That's awesome. Thanks for that. But I'm also wanting to expand my skill set with actual programming. Where's a good place to start there?


Now you have changed the topic. This forum is dedicated to discussions about game design, not programming. Go on the For Beginners forum and read the FAQs there, and read the other 10 posts that have asked this same question in the past few hours.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#9 HybridWave   Members   -  Reputation: 105

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 01:49 PM

So over the last couple weeks I began making a simple card game. I've already got the core mechanics laid out, but I keep seeing different variations and attachment rules. How simple should this be? I feel like making it bare bones basic will make it easier to take out and demo with people, but they might not be the optimal rules. Should I just iterate into these rules as I refine, or am I better off starting with the rules I know will make it more fun?

#10 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10179

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 02:42 PM

1. I keep seeing different variations and attachment rules.
2. How simple should this be?
3. making it bare bones basic will make it easier to take out and demo with people, but they might not be the optimal rules.
4. Should I just iterate into these rules as I refine, or am I better off starting with the rules I know will make it more fun?


1. Where do you keep seeing these? Are your playtesters coming up with them, or do you mean you keep thinking up these things?
2. It may depend on your audience. Mass market demands simplicity. If you're targeting hardcore CCG players, then the market will bear some complexity.
3. So what you're saying is that you might want to demo the simple rules. Makes sense to me.
4. I don't understand the question. What I do is set up rule variations for beginners, intermediate, and advanced players.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#11 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 19453

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 09:58 PM

Try some play testing, and see how your players react - you'll soon get an idea if things are too complicated, or if your system is too simple and doesn't offer enough options.

As Tom says, also keep in mind the expectations of your target market.




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