Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Interested in a FREE copy of HTML5 game maker Construct 2?

We'll be giving away three Personal Edition licences in next Tuesday's GDNet Direct email newsletter!

Sign up from the right-hand sidebar on our homepage and read Tuesday's newsletter for details!


We're also offering banner ads on our site from just $5! 1. Details HERE. 2. GDNet+ Subscriptions HERE. 3. Ad upload HERE.


impulse size at a collision


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
3 replies to this topic

#1 kirenemook12   Members   -  Reputation: 103

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 08 May 2012 - 08:05 AM

hello everyone

I am making a 3D game, and i am working on the physics. I know the direction of the impulse, now i need to know its magnitude. I have looked at conservation of momentum, but i don't know how to apply that if the object can rotate.

so my question is, how can i calculate the magnitude of an impulse at a collision?

Sponsor:

#2 ButchDean   Members   -  Reputation: 110

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 08 May 2012 - 08:35 PM

I don't think the conservation of momentum is the right approach. For your collision resolver you should have coded in something to represent the Coefficient of Restitution. With the surrounding math regarding closing velocity and everything else, you will be able to define how 'sticky' the collision will be. As an example, let c represent the Coefficient of Restitution, and s be the separating velocity, then:

if c = 0, then s = 0. The objects colliding will stick together at the point of contact.

if c = 1, then s = s. The separating velocity will be the same as the closing velocity.

#3 kirenemook12   Members   -  Reputation: 103

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 10 May 2012 - 08:53 AM

and how about rotation? if a object only rotates and hits a object, the object will get a impulse either. and what if the object both has a linear velocity and a rotational velocity?

#4 ButchDean   Members   -  Reputation: 110

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 22 May 2012 - 08:16 PM

You're getting into the realm of the 'moment of inertia'. You will need to also simulate friction. Do you have any idea how to move forward with that?




Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS