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Where do i start :(


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#1 MirageUY   Members   -  Reputation: 110

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 08:04 PM

Hi,i'm 16 and i want to learn to program, i learnt a little c#, but i don't know what to do, where to start, what can i do to get more involved :S.

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#2 Plutonium   Members   -  Reputation: 349

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 10:38 PM

Start learning XNA. It uses C# and give a lots tutorials.

#3 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 9281

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 11:09 PM

Uhh XNA would be a bit premature. For all you know MirageUY doesn't want to make 2D/3D games (yet?) and might just be interested in the programming part of things.

Mirage, there are many C# tutorials you can follow which will guide you to learn various aspects of programming. But here's my mini-tutorial: usually the first start after getting comfy with the language is to work on a small Tetris/Pong clone or a simple text game. Agenda programs were also a classic and taught you many things relating to file loading and information display. Then you could move on to more advanced stuff (such as a folders cleaning program which will detect duplicate files in a folder and delete all but one). It doesn't have to be meaningful, it's just practice.

Basically I think the best way to go forward is to pick a small project to do, and really do it. Don't pick something too large or you will lose interest ("run out of steam") and never finish. Also make sure the project is something concrete that you can show to yourself and other people, so that you get a sense of accomplishment. And of course, don't take something too easy, or you won't learn much.

So now the question you have to answer is, how much do you know? We can only offer broad, general advice until you specify the details.

Also: keep everything you code in a personal folder, and never lose it. You will want to refer to it later on (and you will feel more confident as the folder grows in size).

Edited by Bacterius, 13 May 2012 - 11:11 PM.

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#4 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5755

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 05:55 AM

Read me

#5 MESEnterprisesLLC   Members   -  Reputation: 107

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 08:19 AM

MirageUY -

Start where I did - I was about your age - though home computers were just entering the marketplace. Be observant, and look for little tasks to do. Go to your local bookstore for a few hours, and read up on the languages out there, the techniques, etc. Start by writing simple console-type applications that perform simple utility functions - maybe parse through a file and plot the number of times words appear in the file, or something where you build a catalog-type system that integrates a simple MySQL DB. Maybe look at your favorite utility that you use, and try to mimic it (or make it better.) The task isn't that important as just getting experience under your belt with a language or two and learn the steps towards problem solving using that language.

I would not jump all in and try complicated things in the start; your main goal should be to get comfortable with the language, and getting your mind trained to look at a problem and have some ideas on how to get to the solution. When you have confidence in the simple tasks, you can venture into the more complex.

Hope that helps a little.

Michael.
Michael Suess
MES Enterprises, LLC
http://mesenterprisesllc.com

#6 MirageUY   Members   -  Reputation: 110

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 09:43 AM

First, Thank for all the replies.
Then, anyone knows spanish? Cuz i'm from Uruguay and i'm learning from this tutorial
I know - Console.WriteLine(). How to do some math ( + , - , * , / , %) how to imput text (ConvertTo + read line), if and else. There is all i know xD. Then i stopped. Do you recommend a tutorial or book to start learning the other stuff?
Ok. and i have other question The playstation suite sdk can i use c# on it? And what can i do with it? programs and games?

Playstation SDK looks very cheap only $99 as this says.

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Also my aunt's boyfriend offered me to make web pages for him, something like i have to learn .net and database, but i dk what this is :D

Edited by MirageUY, 14 May 2012 - 09:53 AM.


#7 timothyjlaird   Members   -  Reputation: 404

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 06:26 PM

Well you need a grounding in object oriented programming and algebra (linear algebra if you want to go 3d) to really get anywhere. Probably the most obvious route is the c# language with the XNA toolkit. If you are impatient, you can try Blitz3d...which is a like BASIC but with some hacky object oriented mechanics thrown in. It's a shortcut to 3d graphics but you'll reach the limits pretty fast. Probably the best thing you can do is teach yourself how to do research...99% of the time someone else has confronted with the same problem.

#8 MirageUY   Members   -  Reputation: 110

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 07:49 AM

Well you need a grounding in object oriented programming and algebra (linear algebra if you want to go 3d) to really get anywhere. Probably the most obvious route is the c# language with the XNA toolkit. If you are impatient, you can try Blitz3d...which is a like BASIC but with some hacky object oriented mechanics thrown in. It's a shortcut to 3d graphics but you'll reach the limits pretty fast. Probably the best thing you can do is teach yourself how to do research...99% of the time someone else has confronted with the same problem.

so i need to know C#(which is a object oriented programming language ) + algebra?

And can someone answer my Pssuite question?

#9 bobbias   Members   -  Reputation: 120

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 08:16 AM

Object Oriented Programming refers to the way of using the language. For instance, you can get away with programming an entire program inside your main function in C# without ever using another class. That would still be procedural programming, despite the fact that C# is object oriented.

What he means is that you need to understand the concepts of objects, inheritance, etc.

Do you know what it means that something is an object? Do you understand inheritance? If you don't know what those mean, you should go read up about that before you go further.

As for linear algebra, think about this. When you draw things to the screen in 2D, your you need to describe where things are on the screen. To do that you need to understand cartesian coordinates. Here's an example of where you need to know linear algebra:

You have a ball being drawn on the screen in 2D.
You want to make that ball move on an angle that isn't just up/down or left/right.
Say the ball needs to move at a degree angle up and to the right. You need to know how to convert an angle and a distance to the X/Y coordinates on the screen that the ball will end up.

#10 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5755

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 10:21 AM


Well you need a grounding in object oriented programming and algebra (linear algebra if you want to go 3d) to really get anywhere. Probably the most obvious route is the c# language with the XNA toolkit. If you are impatient, you can try Blitz3d...which is a like BASIC but with some hacky object oriented mechanics thrown in. It's a shortcut to 3d graphics but you'll reach the limits pretty fast. Probably the best thing you can do is teach yourself how to do research...99% of the time someone else has confronted with the same problem.

so i need to know C#(which is a object oriented programming language ) + algebra?

And can someone answer my Pssuite question?



Yes, PS Suite uses C#. I've created a tutorial series if you are interested. Read the look around post for an idea of how the SDK works.

#11 Goran Milovanovic   Members   -  Reputation: 1104

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 02:38 PM

The Blender Game Engine is a fairly decent platform to start with.

Relevant resources can be found in this thread: http://www.gamedev.net/topic/625003-video-tutorials-blender-game-engine/

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#12 MirageUY   Members   -  Reputation: 110

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 07:21 PM

I need to learn to Program object oriented like, then algebra (it means all the x,y stuff? like y = ax+ b and so on?) and then start trying to make things with it?
.




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