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Creating graphics for a full screen game? What dimensions?


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#21 szecs   Members   -  Reputation: 2096

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 01:57 PM

Back on the OFF topic:

I think there is a huge difference between GDD for a proven game concept or GDD for a new game concept.
I can imagine a fully detailed, strict, all designed up-front GDD for a tetris clone or other remakes, but i cannot, for an unproven concept. Ee should discuss the two cases separately.

Edited by szecs, 07 June 2012 - 01:58 PM.


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#22 glhf   Banned   -  Reputation: -585

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 02:12 PM

I concur that you're dealing with this issue before its time. And if you are giving the design document to a team, these are really issues that the UI artist should already be familiar with and understand.

But if you want to have some idea of the resolutions you should support, do a search for "browser display statistics". This should give you a decent idea of what resolutions people are using. You can use this data to determine for yourself the resolutions you'd like to target.

Also, I've often seen games provide UI elements in 2 or 3 different sizes and choose which to use based on screen resolution. Even if you slice up buttons and whatnot into corner/edge/middle sections, the same graphic may not look good at both your minimum and maximum supported display size. Having multiple sizes of the UI elements can help to mitigate this issue.


I'm actually planning on outsourcing the UI art from someone who isn't a UI artist but just a normal artist.. Much cheaper then hiring a pro.
The only person I allow to share my revenue is the programmer, the art will be completely outsourced.
It's important to have programmer remaining after game is released for any problems and fixes, small updates and maintaining the game.

#23 winsrp   Members   -  Reputation: 273

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 02:24 PM

on topic

I think the biggest resolution you should care is the 30" monitor resolution, after that if you game ever gets to support something like 3 monitor view, you can still have your GUI centered on the middle monitor without streching it too far.

Still you have to decide what resolution suits you best, for example I have a 27" monitor with 1920*1200 resolution which is bigger than 1080p, and I do like to have my GUIs on the main monitor.

Is also advice that when planning your gui, some of the elements can be separeted, for example dont make a gui that is a square all around the monitor otherwise your are in a deep problem when you have a bigger resolution where the elements cannot be moved.

normally you will have a small element on the bottom of the screen that can be streach horizontally as needed, and maybe some floating elements on the sides, like stats, friend names, chat boxes, etc, and maybe some information on the top middle like monster life, etc. Just check any modern game and try to separete the details.

Edited by winsrp, 07 June 2012 - 02:26 PM.


#24 glhf   Banned   -  Reputation: -585

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 02:25 PM

Also on the thing about this might not be something part of GDD to mention dimensions for images..
I think it's borderline tbh.

Because in a GDD you are supposed to detail what stuff are on the screen and what you can do.
So if I want a button I have to mention there's a button.. what it's called... where on the screen it is.. what happens if you press it /hover mouse over it/hold it down etc... and why wouldnt the size of button also be included?

Right now I only have childishly drawn sketches of where everything belongs on the screen.. that's why I think it's important to hire a cheap artist to make some proper images for the GDD and especially for the concept page and iteranary... and I needed to know all this info form this thread to know what I should ask of the artist... or else I might of just asked for JPG but now I know better lol.

Edited by glhf, 07 June 2012 - 02:30 PM.


#25 Legendre   Members   -  Reputation: 963

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 07:56 PM

Because in a GDD you are supposed to detail what stuff are on the screen and what you can do.
So if I want a button I have to mention there's a button.. what it's called... where on the screen it is.. what happens if you press it /hover mouse over it/hold it down etc... and why wouldnt the size of button also be included?


If I am making a fantasy RPG that has a warrior character, why wouldn't I include the exact size of every sprite, animation and artwork for that character? Why wouldn't I include the exact color code for every part of the character, including the color of every piece of item, equipment, weapon, accessory the character will possibly ever use? In fact, why wouldn't every single feature, change or addition to the game for the next 10 years be stated in advance?

1) Because its too much work. Some things are better done "on the fly". E.g. I'll decide the size of the button when I actually make the button.

2) It is hard to decide beforehand. There is really no way to fine tune certain details until all the pieces are there. E.g. I don't know the exact location of the "create game" button in my game lobby until I see the interface, all the other buttons, get feedback from players and see what the best location for it is.

3) Because I want my artist to have creative freedom. When I pay an artist, I am paying for his creativity and design skills. If I am doing everything myself, I might as well do the art myself and save the money.

4) Because I am not an artist. I can draw, but whatever I produce will be inferior to those from the professional artists that I am hiring.

5) Because it might depend on my technology. True story: I love JPEG. But the game engine I am using only supports PNG and so I have to use PNG.

I suppose we can both agree that some details should be handled later. :)

#26 glhf   Banned   -  Reputation: -585

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 02:45 PM


Because in a GDD you are supposed to detail what stuff are on the screen and what you can do.
So if I want a button I have to mention there's a button.. what it's called... where on the screen it is.. what happens if you press it /hover mouse over it/hold it down etc... and why wouldnt the size of button also be included?


If I am making a fantasy RPG that has a warrior character, why wouldn't I include the exact size of every sprite, animation and artwork for that character? Why wouldn't I include the exact color code for every part of the character, including the color of every piece of item, equipment, weapon, accessory the character will possibly ever use? In fact, why wouldn't every single feature, change or addition to the game for the next 10 years be stated in advance?

1) Because its too much work. Some things are better done "on the fly". E.g. I'll decide the size of the button when I actually make the button.

2) It is hard to decide beforehand. There is really no way to fine tune certain details until all the pieces are there. E.g. I don't know the exact location of the "create game" button in my game lobby until I see the interface, all the other buttons, get feedback from players and see what the best location for it is.

3) Because I want my artist to have creative freedom. When I pay an artist, I am paying for his creativity and design skills. If I am doing everything myself, I might as well do the art myself and save the money.

4) Because I am not an artist. I can draw, but whatever I produce will be inferior to those from the professional artists that I am hiring.

5) Because it might depend on my technology. True story: I love JPEG. But the game engine I am using only supports PNG and so I have to use PNG.

I suppose we can both agree that some details should be handled later. Posted Image


Nice exageration.
It's really not at all too much work to write down all these details... and you really have to or else you get what you always talk about... unforeseen things happen that cause you to have to redo lots of code and design and rethink what parts of the game is going to be about.
You know what what button and thigs you want in your UI.. now you have to plan where they should be to know that they can all be on the screen at all.. and after that it doesn't really take a lot of additional work to figure out sizes for them.
Same thing with characters in the game.. There's really no reason to not do it.. the bit of time it takes you to write down the size saves so much development time of discussion and redoing lots of code.

I can't wait until people start respecting REAL game designers instead of calling the programmer with an idea in his head the designer.

#27 szecs   Members   -  Reputation: 2096

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 02:48 PM

This is just plain trolling now.

#28 Marvel Magnum   Members   -  Reputation: 324

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 02:30 AM

I can't wait until people start respecting REAL game designers instead of calling the programmer with an idea in his head the designer.


This is totally uncalled for. What Legendre said, is not entirely untrue and very much reflects REAL life situations in REAL game studios and I know what I am talking about. As for you glhf, how many games have you designed previously for REAL? Not much, I'm guessing from the topic of your first post.

The topic has become something that is very unlike gamedev.net. I think its time someone closed off this topic!

#29 szecs   Members   -  Reputation: 2096

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 02:49 AM

A last thought:

Glhf: you seem to have no (or no serious) experience in game making (design, programming, art, ect). So please, heed the words by everybody.

You are trying to do the job of a game designer, gameplay designer(s), artist(s), I guess music composer(s) too, gameplay tester(s), writer(s)?, game tester(s), level and content editor(s), game balance tester(s)/tweaker(s) (or whoever), GUI designer(s) and user experience expert(s), accessibility expert(s) and maybe some other guys too (I don't know).

You are talking about respect, while you are soo arrogant that you think you are able to do every aspects of these fields up front before any actual implementation (which is impossible. One person can make a full, polished game, but with continuous modification of the design.). That is utterly arrogant and unrespectful towards pretty much every profession involved in game making.

Your only excuse for that is that you are probably a teenager.Posted Image

Edited by szecs, 10 June 2012 - 02:53 AM.


#30 glhf   Banned   -  Reputation: -585

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 05:25 AM

You are trying to do the job of a game designer, gameplay designer(s), artist(s), I guess music composer(s) too, gameplay tester(s), writer(s)?, game tester(s), level and content editor(s), game balance tester(s)/tweaker(s) (or whoever), GUI designer(s) and user experience expert(s), accessibility expert(s) and maybe some other guys too (I don't know).


All of that falls into game design.
Just that you could split them into different categories inside game design if you are a rich studio and have several game designers.
We blueprint the GUI and level designs etc but we don't create it.. that's what the artists do.

Testers are needed only to test if the game designer knows what he is doing.
Tweakers are needed for example combat systems because there's just not that many game designers in this world that are pro when it comes to combat and pvp.
But a game designer should ofcourse do his best job and make the need for the above 2 jobs as little as possible.. especially if you're indy and cant afford to hire a consultant tweaker.
If a game designer is pro at combat and pvp then theres no need for a tweaker because he is one and tweaker is a game designing job.

#31 JTippetts   Moderators   -  Reputation: 8159

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 08:05 AM

I think this thread has gone far enough off-topic, and we really don't need to keep having this same argument over and over.




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