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#1 EdEc   Members   -  Reputation: 152

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Posted 11 June 2012 - 02:56 PM

Hello

So I have few questions that consider story design.

The first one would be about dialogues and voices. When I have a game scene where there are dialogues what is the most appropriatetechnique to use ? Should I write text where when you enter a particular area you trigger the conversation with someone, where basically text is written on the bottom od the page? Or should I use some cut scenes? Or combine both and when combining, should there be some kind of relationship ? For example a cut scene represents that you have moved on to the Act 2 of the story. What kind of relationships are the between the cut scenes and the "in gamplay scenes".
I know that will you use voices or not in dialoguesdemands on the budget, but how expensive can it get? Is it possible that this kind of service can be found online ? Could I search for someone with equipment and so on, or is this thing done locally ? How expensive is it (considering that the people are not famous ones)?

The second one is about game trailers

The answer could be vague so it would be better if someone knows some good articles that I can read mattering game trailer? The main concern is how do I actually present my game in 3-4 min trailer ? Should it be story? Backstory of main charachter? Some gamplay scenes? I looked for different kind of trailers and some said everything about the game wich for me personally killed the game and some said very little about the game and it was all about the story. I don't want to do that. I would like to know techniques used for creating trailers, what do you present that would be just enough for ? I know they are totally different from movies, since in the movies you present the basic plot you go and watch awesomedialogues and scenes, but in game you sort of discover the plot, trough gamplay and environment.

The third one is about a part of the story I am struggling with

I have this part that deals with a tragic moment. The story begins with two people and you as one of them. Letter your partner dies. How do I create bond with this other guy and the actual player ? Should I try and make some rescue scenes or some emotional dialogues (dont want to go to emotional, it could get, well, weird)? Some articles about this would be useful.

Thanks Posted Image

Edited by EdEc, 13 June 2012 - 03:03 PM.


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#2 Dream Cutter   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 214

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 03:05 PM

Sounds like you have a large project in mind, and that this may be your first project. Before you get too deeply vested I think you may want to take a step back and get more acquainted with game development and production techniques and common practices of the industry. These questions while fundamental, also are highly dependent on the game projects objectives, and the prioritization of that list of objectives. Also needed is a list of resources needed and the limitations (depth of funds, technology and complexity) before you can begin to decide some of these factors. Highly recommend a fun and very practical book called "Level Up!: The Guide to Great Video Game Design". Its in print and ebook. Consider starting with a simple project, refining that and publishing it, then progressively increase a game design complexity so you don't over extend yourself and get discouraged.
3DSkyDome.com animated sky boxes and instant 3d Android & WebGL publishing.

#3 EdEc   Members   -  Reputation: 152

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 02:27 PM

Well first and second are purely for educational purposes, I just want to know. The third one is for the project and it is quite small.

#4 StillWorkingOnIt   Members   -  Reputation: 123

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 04:06 PM

Well first and second are purely for educational purposes, I just want to know. The third one is for the project and it is quite small.


Because i'm feeling kind of lazy i'll adress just this one. If you want to create an emotional bond between the player and this other character its good to firstly have a solid backstory about how the main character and the other character know each other. Get the other character to save the main character's life several times. Make this other character extremely optimistic and carefree, to get people feeling like he's the better half of the two characters. If you really want to impact the player get him to die while they're having a conversation about what he wants to do in the future (like his dreams and goals) in a hostile area, and then bam! he dies right infront of you. and your character has to become extremely emotionally upset about it. Or even better, as they're about to make it and they're home free he gets killed. the point being you have to get the character to be the better of the two (personality wise) you have to have a history between them, and he has to die in a happy moment to turn the mood completely around.

#5 Mito   Members   -  Reputation: 855

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 01:07 PM

EdEc, on 14 June 2012 - 05:27 PM, said:
Well first and second are purely for educational purposes, I just want to know. The third one is for the project and it is quite small.

Because i'm feeling kind of lazy i'll adress just this one.


Well, i'll address just this one too, but it's because i don't know how to answer to the other two.


First of all, you need to develop this character's personality.

He must have opinions, Ideals and defects.

The player must have spent some time with this character.


But don't make the death of a character close to the player pointless.

Don't make him die because of a mistake, unless it's a error of the player that he's trying to fix.

As a font of inspiration, play the Mass Effect trilogy. I won't give you spoilers Posted Image

#6 Stormynature   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3422

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 07:59 PM

<br />I know that will you use voices or not in dialoguesdemands on the budget, but how expensive can it get? Is it possible that this kind of service can be found online ? Could I search for someone with equipment and so on, or is this thing done locally ? How expensive is it (considering that the people are not famous ones)?<br />


The best place to check with this question would probably be via the Business and Law forum. The Sound forum might also have insight.

http://www.ehow.com/...ice-actors.html
http://www.voices.com/rates
http://www.voiceover...la/08union.html

<br />The first one would be about dialogues and voices. When I have a game scene where there are dialogues what is the most appropriatetechnique to use ? Should I write text where when you enter a particular area you trigger the conversation with someone, where basically text is written on the bottom od the page? Or should I use some cut scenes? Or combine both and when combining, should there be some kind of relationship ? For example a cut scene represents that you have moved on to the Act 2 of the story. What kind of relationships are the between the cut scenes and the "in gamplay scenes". <br />


Dialogue issues can be dependant on a number of factors:
  • If the player needs to directly interact with the NPC then simply clicking on the NPC would be most appropriate. If needed the NPC could attract the player's attention by saying "Over here" and waving an arm to help differentiate them from other NPC's in the room. This would normally be a requirement for critical plot developments.
  • If the dialog is not critical persay but might contain information that is optionally helpful or colourful in nature, then using a physical distance from said NPC to trigger the conversation (usually with another NPC). Player then has the option to move away if not interested or stay and listen or in some cases it is a gameplay aspect to stealth games of waiting for the comvo to stop and the NPC's to separate so the player can move on.
  • Voice interactions can also happen automatically without player interaction at all. For example you have just rescued some hostages and you notify someone over the radio that the hostages are safe.
  • Cut scenes I am not a great fan of for story implementations as I look at them as immersion breakers most of the time. However a good cut scene can be effective at times to communicate information that is essentially plot oriented but would take far to long for player interaction to be appreciative of doing, to obtain the information. An example would be of a briefing room where you have the guy at the front outlining the mission details to a squad team using various AV aids.

<br />The answer could be vague so it would be better if someone knows some good articles that I can read mattering game trailer? The main concern is how do I actually present my game in 3-4 min trailer ? Should it be story? Backstory of main character? Some gamplay scenes? I looked for different kind of trailers and some said everything about the game wich for me personally killed the game and some said very little about the game and it was all about the story. I don't want to do that. I would like to know techniques used for creating trailers, what do you present that would be just enough for ? I know they are totally different from movies, since in the movies you present the basic plot you go and watch awesome dialogues and scenes, but in game you sort of discover the plot, trough gamplay and environment.<br />


Blur Studio - Professional Trailer makers - Very high quality standard
http://vz3.blur.com/work

Unless your game is near the end I wouldn't worry to much about making a trailer. However that said, some companies do make them early in the production with non-game elements in order to begin whetting the appetite of fans etc. There are many different ways to present a trailer: You can concentrate on story, gameplay, unique features, anything really. If you are using a trailer to market the game then your needs are very different from using a trailer in-game. I am going to refer to trailers used in game as cut-scenes (or opening/closing scene) from herein btw. If you are going to use Trailers for marketing purposes then you would probably find more pertinent details through Business and Law forum and some insights possibly through the Visual Arts forum. At the end of the day what you effectively do is tell something to the audience...what you want to tell them is....well that's your area to sort out.

Using opening and closing scene (trailer) for Chapters or the game itself are a useful way of providing background story elements and major shifts in plot elements: for example you have just sent the nuclear reactor into critical thus completing the mission. The closing scene for that chapter/mission could show the explosion of the reactor as well the little children and fluffy white kittens being atomised or slowly dying from radiation poisoning...You really are a cold bastard aren't you! What sort of evil mind nukes kittens and children?...Basically they are effective overviews being provided to the player.

http://gametheoryonl...-game-trailers/
http://pocketcyclone...eo-tips-tricks/
http://blog.kertgartner.com/

I have this part that deals with a tragic moment. The story begins with two people and you as one of them. Later your partner dies. How do I create bond with this other guy and the actual player ? Should I try and make some rescue scenes or some emotional dialogues (don't want to go to emotional, it could get, well, weird)? Some articles about this would be useful.


Establishing comradery can be tricksome at times. Probably the simplest and most effective way is to have an ongoing (out of the player's hands) conversation between the two about some trivial story or event or argument referring to issues prior to this game's time period, that goes on throughout the time the two characters are together i.e. a non-related mini-story narrative outside the primary focus of the game. Utilising this mini-story for comedic as well serious moments can be a very effective tool if done right and at the same time does not detract from the game's plotline itself directly. Attempting to force situations upon them as scripted elements for the player are less effective as if you are constantly rescuing the NPC, then the NPC is a relief when dead. If the NPC is rescuing the player then the player feels as though they have had ability to control the game taken away....on the other hand if you have just set the Nuclear Reactor off and your partner shows up in a hot air ballon to rescue you...you could create some comedic points as well glow in any nightclub for the rest of your life due to such a slow form of escape transport.


Edit: One additional note on cut-scenes. In a lot of games they are often used as fillers to hide the next section of a game being loaded up.



I will add in some relevant links later on...but gf has decided we must walk the cat's....sigh at indoor cats costing $1500 each and requiring leashes to walk them Posted Image

Edit: links added

Edit: Doh! Just noticed the thread was a month ago ><

Edited by Stormynature, 21 July 2012 - 12:05 AM.


#7 Mito   Members   -  Reputation: 855

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 09:58 AM

if you had not said I would not have noticed ><




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