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How would i create this game?


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#1 Chris941   Members   -  Reputation: 144

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 05:34 PM

Hi All!

So i am starting to learn UnityScript to help myself with Unity, but i'm just generally confused when it comes to actually creating a game.

So here is the general idea of the game: You control a catapult and the idea is to destroy the other castle, but by doing that, there is so much more. Customization, building up your catapult, unlocking different catapult balls, etc. But how do i do this? how do i create this game? how can i create a character or the catapult? i have so many questions!

Look at Catapult Kings for ios for an example! by the way, how does Chillingo create its games?

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#2 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 17274

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 01:10 AM

You would start by doing one thing at a time -- it's easy to get overwhelmed when looking at a complete and polished game and trying to figure out how to create everything, but if you break it down into smaller problems and tackle them one at a time you'll find that the majority of them will be easily solved.

Firstly, you should spend some time familiarising yourself with the basics of using Unity, and work through some of the beginner tutorials. I gave a few suggestions for how you might approach doing so in your other topic.


Don't worry about the details of complete games, or how professional developers went about creating their games for now. Concentrate on the basics, and work your way up. Learn how to use the Unity editor; find out how to put a single thing into a game world; find out how to make it respond to input; find out how to make it do what you want; find out how to add a menu. Just keep adding one small piece at a time until you can work your way up to a completed game. Posted Image

#3 Kuam   Members   -  Reputation: 117

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 03:30 AM

I definitely agree with the above statement. I thought that when I started learning C# and XNA (I am still new, I started a few weeks ago but am progressing at a decent rate) I could simply start with a "build this game" tutorial online and would understand how everything works in building a full program to start. I can assure you, it didn't work out that way. When they started implementing the various methods, classes, and subtle syntax to the language in the code, I could not understand why they wrote the code one way or another, which, for future game writing, is useless. I was merely copying code and not understanding it.

However, I invested in some real, published books and not just tutorials on the web. I started with the infamous "Hello World" program and have progressed from that. I am now understanding how classes have pre-built methods that are utilized to perform various tasks. I'm still learning, and I'm movtivated to learn by my desire to eventually build a high speed 2-D, and hopefully a few months down the road 3-D, game.

You will be much happier and productive if you take your time and put your dues in learning your language of choice from the ground up. A 3-year old learning a new language can't write a college level thesis, nor can we jump straight into the the meat and potatoes of programming without understand it. Good luck!

Cheers

#4 6677   Members   -  Reputation: 1058

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 03:49 AM

In whatever language you choose you need to start small. Do things like "Hello, World!" first (always the first thing to do in EVERY new language you learn, programmers law). Then you can do guess my number games. Learn how to use "complex" structures like IF statements and for and while loops. Functions will also be VERY important and classes/OOP will be very important for game devlopment. I've listed these things in the order that they should be learnt aswell really.



#5 Chris941   Members   -  Reputation: 144

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 05:50 AM

You would start by doing one thing at a time -- it's easy to get overwhelmed when looking at a complete and polished game and trying to figure out how to create everything, but if you break it down into smaller problems and tackle them one at a time you'll find that the majority of them will be easily solved.

Firstly, you should spend some time familiarising yourself with the basics of using Unity, and work through some of the beginner tutorials. I gave a few suggestions for how you might approach doing so in your other topic.


Don't worry about the details of complete games, or how professional developers went about creating their games for now. Concentrate on the basics, and work your way up. Learn how to use the Unity editor; find out how to put a single thing into a game world; find out how to make it respond to input; find out how to make it do what you want; find out how to add a menu. Just keep adding one small piece at a time until you can work your way up to a completed game. Posted Image


Thanks! i'll have to look into the forums at Unity and such, btw what games have you created?

#6 Chris941   Members   -  Reputation: 144

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 05:53 AM

I definitely agree with the above statement. I thought that when I started learning C# and XNA (I am still new, I started a few weeks ago but am progressing at a decent rate) I could simply start with a "build this game" tutorial online and would understand how everything works in building a full program to start. I can assure you, it didn't work out that way. When they started implementing the various methods, classes, and subtle syntax to the language in the code, I could not understand why they wrote the code one way or another, which, for future game writing, is useless. I was merely copying code and not understanding it.

However, I invested in some real, published books and not just tutorials on the web. I started with the infamous "Hello World" program and have progressed from that. I am now understanding how classes have pre-built methods that are utilized to perform various tasks. I'm still learning, and I'm movtivated to learn by my desire to eventually build a high speed 2-D, and hopefully a few months down the road 3-D, game.

You will be much happier and productive if you take your time and put your dues in learning your language of choice from the ground up. A 3-year old learning a new language can't write a college level thesis, nor can we jump straight into the the meat and potatoes of programming without understand it. Good luck!

Cheers


Thanks! i'm officially 1 week into this, and i learned more than i did 1 week ago so i'm gonna consider myself off to a great start. I might be learning slowly because at first i didn't think i needed to learn code (i didn't know what code was....) But some of the topics i've written helped me out. I wish that i could have went to Cryengine 3 to make a game (though i would need to learn a lot more about programming) but considering i was running at 2 fps, i had to delete it. Unity it is! good luck to you too!

Chris941




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