Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


Looking For A Engine


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
3 replies to this topic

#1 Luke Holden   Members   -  Reputation: 104

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 15 June 2012 - 06:11 PM

I have a multiplayer fps game I want to make, and wondering if I should stick with Unity 3D, or move to a different engine. The game I have in mind is very similar to battlefield. The main concern I have is I want to be able to support at least 64 player matches. There will be alot of people using vehicles and planes so the maps will be large. I want the maps to be wide open with no fog.

I've read that the Torque engine could handle 100 or even over 125 players. Although the graphics of the games made with Torque dont look that appealing. And wondering if that would spell trouble for my game.

I have no networking experience so I will be learning that along the way. Although I want the easiest platform to work with and the most suitable engine for my game.

Sponsor:

#2 joew   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3614

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 15 June 2012 - 09:52 PM

Unity uses the Raknet library for its networking implementation and you can also use the .Net sockets and write your own or use an existing one. A lot of people use Photon server with Unity when they want larger amounts of players and/or dedicated servers. Realistically you could do everything you want regarding networking with Unity you just have to build the implementation. Also note that supporting a large amount of players isn't really about which library/engine you use but about your implementation and how much data you are sending, etc.

Also note that aesthetics and graphics are completely separate topics that usually get lumped into the same thing by newcomers. It is impossible to judge an engine by looking at screenshots, etc because you are comparing the aesthetics of the art and not the technology itself. There are many capable engines for indies (in my opinion Unity and C4 are the two best) and performance and how it looks will be determined by your art team and programmers, not the engine itself.

#3 Luke Holden   Members   -  Reputation: 104

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 16 June 2012 - 12:12 AM

thanks for the response. I'm researching Photon right now and also considering ulink. I heard that Unities built in networking is not very good. Or at least needs a ton of networking skills to do correctly.

I've been a 3d Artist for 5 years so I know that graphics and performance are two different things. Although I like to look at the graphics of engines so I know that people are able to do detailed work and the program is not technically limiting their capabilities.

#4 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8285

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 16 June 2012 - 02:44 AM

I agree. It doesn't matter if you have the most powerful computer in the world, with the most advanced and sophisticated photorealistic rendering algorithm conceivable - if your textures and models are crap, your graphics will look like crap. Basically, you will have given a correct solution, to the wrong problem.

That said, it works the other way around too. If you have epic graphical assets, you can pull off wonders with just some ingenuity on even really bad and inaccurate game engines.

Of course, having the best of both worlds is probably the better choice here.

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis





Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS