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Game Maker, Unity, or Blender?


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#1 Friendless Dev   Members   -  Reputation: 106

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 09:09 PM

Hey guys, I'm new to game development, and I barely know any code currently (I'm 14 as well). I've just started playing around with Game Maker, I tried Blender but I couldn't use it well, and Unity seems a bit more advanced. I have one project that I wish to start once I'm familiar with game development, but for now what is the best engine to start off with?

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#2 greenzone   Members   -  Reputation: 672

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 12:17 AM

An idea of what kind of game your trying to make might help answer your question a little better. Also your level of ambition towards game making might also be useful in determining how to respond in an educated way to your question.
J-GREEN

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#3 Mr Rage   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 12:26 AM

I've used all 3.

Game Maker is mainly used for 2D games. Its easy to use.

Blender is more of a FREE 3D modelling and animation suite. You can build many things in Blender like a human body also rigging it and texturing it will successfully bring the human body to life. I don't know much about Blender's game engine but people don't really use it.

Unity is a free engine that requires you to learn a language such as Javascript, C++(pro version), C# etc.

What do you want to be in game development?

Game programmer, designer, artist and animator etc.

Lastly what type of game would you like to make in the future?

The floor is yours.

#4 abcdef44   Banned   -  Reputation: 2

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 01:16 AM

I don't know much about Blender's game engine but people don't really use it.


You mean YOU don't use it? It's among the most used 3D modellers.

Start very, very small as usually the amount of time to invest is a multiple of the
general assuptions.
Also there are very small mobile games making a lot of money, but also big projects that fail.
At 14 foremost don't forget the school.

#5 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5753

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 02:11 AM


I don't know much about Blender's game engine but people don't really use it.


You mean YOU don't use it? It's among the most used 3D modellers.


He is talking about the blender game engine, not the 3D modeller. Blender has a built in game engine aswell, but it is a fairly new addition to the package and hasn't been used that much (yet), from what i can tell it is fairly capable though.
I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#6 Mr Rage   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 03:45 AM



I don't know much about Blender's game engine but people don't really use it.


You mean YOU don't use it? It's among the most used 3D modellers.


He is talking about the blender game engine, not the 3D modeller. Blender has a built in game engine aswell, but it is a fairly new addition to the package and hasn't been used that much (yet), from what i can tell it is fairly capable though.

Yes I was talking about Blenders game engine. The 3D modelling in Blender is amazing.

#7 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5178

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 08:32 AM

I always wondered if anyone actually used BGE. You see it mentioned and discussed so rarely that I assume almost nobody is using it, beyond being a prototyping tool.

To the OP, best is a remarkably subjective term.

As a learning tool for a 14 year old to make a 2d game, GameMaker is probably the "easiest". If that is your most important criteria, that would make it the best I suppose.

That said, the most important thing for you to do is jump in, doesn't really matter what you pick. Game development is so full of shiny distractions, new releases and other things to keep you from getting any work done. Pick something and run with it. The nice part is, you can't really make a mistake by choosing the wrong thing. And if you do somehow choose something that is wrong... you are 14, plenty of time to undo that mistake! :)

#8 Vikato   Members   -  Reputation: 137

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 08:47 AM

While there seems to be limited use of the Blender Game Engine, this (http://www.youtube.com/user/Fajrul97) guy appears to have done pretty well with it. And he's 15 if that provides any additional encouragement to give it a try.
Manufacturing metaphores in my melancholy mind.

#9 DFPercush   Members   -  Reputation: 106

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 08:57 AM

If you're not planning on selling it or learning how to use a traditional programming language, you might consider Epic's UDK (Unreal Tournament engine). People actually get hired for this, so it's not completely esoteric. It will introduce you to a lot of the concepts of modern 3d games, and if you choose, you can learn how to do it in OpenGL with your own code later. But you'll need 3ds max or Maya to go with it. As for the choices presented above, I'd say Blender, mainly because you can extend it with Python code and it's free. But that's coming from a programmer. Blender is pretty intimidating, but very powerful. I'd like to see more done with its game engine, if anyone ever manages to figure it out lol.

#10 Friendless Horrible Dev   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 11:39 AM

Well right now I want to start off with simple games. My one long-term project is making a game like Star Wars vs Halo except with large multiplayer. I myself have many ideas for full games. I can somewhat draw, I'm best at drawing space ships and weapons. I'd probably like to be a game designer or programmer. I know a small amount of Java script, but nothing useful for games.

#11 Rion   Members   -  Reputation: 109

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 02:08 PM

Well, Game Maker is good mostly only for 2d games. 3d are also possible but GM limits you in so many ways.

If I were you I'd try Game Maker first. Try some coding and you'll see if you want to do programming which is more advanced.

#12 6677   Members   -  Reputation: 1058

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 02:12 PM

Personally I think trying to get into game development without more code experience than you have is a bad idea. It would be very very useful to have some.

I advise you read this post I made on another topic
EDIT, i think it was post 8 or 9 in that topic, seems sticking it in a spoiler has removed its formatting and it is a huge WALL of text
Spoiler


That post was aimed at someone looking to use unity I believe but another C# "game engine" is XNA, this is very capable but MUCH harder and will require a good amount of C# knowledge.

It is true that you could just use a click and drag environment but programming is a very useful skill. If you do it my way and learn how to program and then move into games development you should have a fair amount of skill for developing regular PC software too.

Edited by 6677, 18 June 2012 - 02:14 PM.


#13 Friendless Horrible Dev   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 02:50 PM

The high school I'm going I believe does have a C++ class, would that be useful in game development? I know it's useful in just regular software development.

#14 6677   Members   -  Reputation: 1058

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 03:12 PM

It would but C++ is horrible to new programmers. Many professional games are written with C++. Infact chances are that at least half the software on your PC was probably written in C++

#15 Goran Milovanovic   Members   -  Reputation: 1103

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 03:23 PM

If anyone is looking for blender game engine tutorials: http://www.gamedev.net/topic/625003-video-tutorials-blender-game-engine/

+---------------------------------------------------------------------+

| Need a programmer?        ->   http://www.nilunder.com/protoblend   |

| Want to become one?       ->   http://www.nilunder.com/tutoring     |
| Game Dev video tutorials  ->   http://www.youtube.com/goranmilovano |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+

#16 abcdef44   Banned   -  Reputation: 2

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 04:29 AM

Now
Z-Virus 2

is a cool game for a 15y!

Is it possible to develop with Blender game engine for Android etc?

If you're interested in programming, sure c++ is a good thing to learn, probably the most
useful language but for starting I would recommend Visual Basic.

Anyway, knowing Blender and C++ you could also use GameKit.

#17 Friendless Horrible Dev   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 02:58 PM

Well I'm going to make a simple 2D over-the-top view game with Game Maker.

#18 Smilex   Members   -  Reputation: 118

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 04:59 PM

As someone new to the experience, I'd urge you to use Blender or Game Maker, and not begin by learning a coding language, and here's my point on why.
Both use graphical logic (It's what I'll call it, and it means that you can make game logic in a graphical user interface (GUI)) and therefore teach you how game logic is done, in a easy and intuitive way. Another thing is that you are 14 and therefore I'll make the assumption that reading might be cumbersome (because you might feel like you don't want to read, just do.), this is usual and many people never loose the habit, but what these two programs offer, is a very easy way to get started. Both feature scripting languages, which means that you can use it as further learning material. And making placeholder graphics is easy in both, so you don't have to waste time doing the art, unless you like to do that.
So all in all, both tools provide you with a way to make things fast, and in the process, learn many of the important things of game development, most notably the logic.
Now to choosing which one of the softwares to use. Blender's game engine is designed to work within Blender, and therefore focuses on 3D development, while Game Maker focuses on 2D, which means that if you enjoy working with 2D more than 3D, go for Game Maker, is it the other way around, then go for Blender. Both are good choices, and a good beginning step for your future in game development.

Personally I started with C++, and I'd like to emphasize that this was a bad idea! Why? Because I've never learnt the logic of game development, and therefore have never made a game except Tic Tac Toe (something which I'm working on changing now, years later). But I did find Game Maker quite some time after learning C++, but at that stage I thought I was too cool for such nonsense, because I could code, yet I could never finish my code. Currently I'm using Blender to prototype a game, and it's very easy.

tl;dr, don't pick up a language if you haven't even tried making games yet, pick Game Maker or Blender.

Note. I don't get why I've seen people tell beginners to use something like C++ and Ogre3D (A massive engine designed to be capable for AAA graphics). It's like giving a kid who hasn't tried Legos yet, the tools and schematics for building a house, and throw them a heap of books on the subject.
Currently trying to contribute to the Desurium project.

Macro, then refine.

#19 greenzone   Members   -  Reputation: 672

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 11:27 PM

Take the c++ class if you can. Its a lot easier to learn in a class environment then it is on your own. questions that can take days to figure out can just be answered quickly by your professor or a fellow student. also it will be a lot of help in the long run even out side of game making. plus you are in high school you dont have to pay for virtually the class which you will in university or college.
J-GREEN

Greenpanoply

#20 M6dEEp   Members   -  Reputation: 888

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 12:05 AM

I got started when I was around 12 years old by making mods for all of my favorite games (Unreal Tournament 2004, Homeworld, then Halo with the Halo Editing Kit and then Unreal Tournament 3). After I started digging into the Halo Editing Kit I found out how to write level scripts and that is what got me interested in programming. Basically what I'm saying is that you will always end up getting into programming at some point with this stuff, and at your age I would suggest easing into it by working with Game Maker or maybe Blender and then going to something like Unity and then learn a programming language after you've gotten some technical know-how. Just remember that if you continue to challenge yourself and always stay committed anything is a piece of cake.




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