Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


New to programming (duh) had some questions...


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
12 replies to this topic

#1 RussDawgUnlimited   Members   -  Reputation: 121

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 19 June 2012 - 08:58 PM

So I wanna start learning how to program, mostly to become a game programmer (duh) but I know i cant just jump right into game programming, I gotta learn how to program in general first. I'm really new to programming, the most I've ever really programmed was one of those games where you click and hold to make an object go up and release to go down, but that one game was made about 3 years ago and in flash, and Ive never really had time to get back into it.....

But now I do have time and I'm going to make time for it too, as I'm really passionate about my games and really wanna get into the industry, and Ive always found programming interesting so I figure I better start now rather than later, but enough rambling, back to my questions: I've been reading a few "so you wanna start programming" articles just to get my feet we to see what Im getting into and I think i have the idea, i just had a few questions regarding starting up, so bear with me as I haven't programmed in a long time and I need to get back into it XD,

Ive been wanting to start up using C++ but the more i read up on it i see that its not a good language to start up with due to its high difficulty for newcomers, as well as it also being outdated and inconvenient (I've read that it takes a lot of code before you can actually get a working product), so what languages would be a good starting point for someone who hasn't done any hardcore programming for years?
I've been thinking of starting off with Python until I've gotten the hang of programming, then moving on to Java and C#, based off what I've read, I just want your guys' opinion.

So basically what I'm trying to ask is what would you guys recommend for a newcomer? Any opinions are welcome, you guys know more than me lol, so anything you guys can offer helps a ton!!

Thanks a bunch.

Sponsor:

#2 RussDawgUnlimited   Members   -  Reputation: 121

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 19 June 2012 - 09:32 PM

Also should I just jump straight into programming games? Like try to make a pong or tetris remake? Or should I just learn to program basic programs first then move onto the gaming side of it?

#3 allencch   Members   -  Reputation: 103

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 19 June 2012 - 10:52 PM

Hi, I am also interested in game development, but does not have enough free time, since game development is not my career.

I personally prefer C or C++, since there are a lot of libraries can be chosen for games, such as OpenAL for sound, OGRE for 3D graphics, SDL for graphics, and so on. The only drawback is that both are difficult to learn. However, if can learn both languages, especially C++, you can learn other languages faster in the future.

In my opinion, Python is good programming language, and quite a lot of Python binding libraries available, such as pygame, Python-Ogre, PyOpenAL, etc. http://wiki.python.org/moin/PythonGameLibraries

In my opinion, jump straight to the game programming, because if doing something you are not interested, it is boring and you will give up later. Learn to create basic games, which have features of your final goal. So, at the end, you can try to combine all the features.

#4 6677   Members   -  Reputation: 1058

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 20 June 2012 - 03:06 AM

Start simple. Unwritten law in every new language you learn is to start with outputting "Hello, World!" to the console. Cover all the basics first. Basic command line output and input. Basic maths (ie taking 2 numbers as an input, adding them together and outputting the result). IF functions and familiarizing yourself with ELSEIF and ELSE aswell. For and while loops are of course incredibly useful. And once you've covered all that move onto writing and using functions/subroutines (some languages like don't distinguish between the 2 but others like C# do). Once you think you've done all that you go back to the beginning and rewrite every program you've written so far to use the more advanced language features you've learnt since then. Classes are also very important to know about but in my expeience python doesn't handle them very well so then would be a good chance to make a switch. java or C# are both good choices. I have no java experience but I do use VB.net regularly and the odd bit of C# (the 2 are very alike)

You can't write a game without the above features. Its a long uphill slog but you'll get there eventually.

#5 Fallenrat   Members   -  Reputation: 85

Like
-1Likes
Like

Posted 20 June 2012 - 08:37 AM

http://niverse.wordpress.com/2012/06/18/5-best-ways-to-start-in-game-development/


A article I wrote, was going to explain but thought I should just like to it instead, has all the starter game engines, and tutorials for each. enjoy making games and good luck

#6 Inuyashakagome16   Members   -  Reputation: 835

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 20 June 2012 - 08:48 AM

In my opinion, jump straight to the game programming, because if doing something you are not interested, it is boring and you will give up later. Learn to create basic games, which have features of your final goal. So, at the end, you can try to combine all the features.

I will have to disagree. "if doing something you are not interested, it is boring and you will give up later" You'll reach a point in making a game where it becomes really difficult and you won't want to continue. (and yes even boring)
Now i do with agree with game examples to learn a programming language. But you still need to make a calculator or two to really understand a language :P (not understand, but learn perhaps?)

#7 Josh Petrie   Moderators   -  Reputation: 2954

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 20 June 2012 - 09:28 AM

I've been thinking of starting off with Python until I've gotten the hang of programming, then moving on to Java and C#, based off what I've read, I just want your guys' opinion.

Any of those three languages would be good choices -- there is also no need to immediately "move on" to another one once you pick up a first one. You can make excellent games in all three of those languages.

Your reservations about learning C++ are well-placed: it is a very poor first language because it was designed and continues to be maintained with the intent of being used by people who already know how to program fairly well. It is inundated in the "programmer is always right," culture, which can be useful at times but is rarely an ideal scenario for a beginner.

Josh Petrie | Core Tools Engineer, 343i | Microsoft C++ MVP


#8 littletray26   Members   -  Reputation: 267

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 June 2012 - 07:45 PM

I learnt programming with C# to start off, then moved onto C++

FTR: C++ is by no means outdated
The majority of Internet Explorer users don't understand the concept of a browsing application, or that there are options.
They just see the big blue 'e' and think "Internet". The thought process usually does not get much deeper than that.

Worms are the weirdest and nicest creatures, and will one day prove themselves to the world.

I love the word Clicky :)

#9 Sid_TheBeginner   Members   -  Reputation: 157

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 June 2012 - 08:34 PM

I would recommend these set of videos http://xoax.net/cpp/crs/console/index.php. I've already started teaching myself C++ from a book so I don't want to jump to these videos. But when I have any algorithm confusions I do check out this website. If you haven't started then this is a great place to start I believe. But once you start following these videos don't "jump" somewhere else. Post your questions here.

Cheers,
--Sid

Edited by Sid_TheBeginner, 24 June 2012 - 08:37 PM.


#10 RussDawgUnlimited   Members   -  Reputation: 121

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 June 2012 - 09:26 PM

Thanks a bunch guys, this is helping a lot, but i had a couple of other questions also, like the math, i understand that you need to be pretty good in math to be able to program (such as the algorithms) and i havent done any hardcore math since high school and am going to be going to college soon but i need to brush up on my math, is it fairly easy to learn without me having to depend on college classes to teach me?

also, i was thinking and i wondered do programmers in the industry program off a book for their games? Or do they do all programming from their head? Is it something they know or something that they're reading up and taking from?

Anyways, thanks for they help, I'll keep posting here if i have more questions, really appreciate the help guys (and gals).

#11 RussDawgUnlimited   Members   -  Reputation: 121

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 June 2012 - 09:27 PM

Thanks a bunch guys, this is helping a lot, but i had a couple of other questions also, like the math, i understand that you need to be pretty good in math to be able to program (such as the algorithms) and i havent done any hardcore math since high school and am going to be going to college soon but i need to brush up on my math, is it fairly easy to learn without me having to depend on college classes to teach me?

also, i was thinking and i wondered do programmers in the industry program off a book for their games? Or do they do all programming from their head? Is it something they know or something that they're reading up and taking from?

Anyways, thanks for they help, I'll keep posting here if i have more questions, really appreciate the help guys (and gals).

#12 littletray26   Members   -  Reputation: 267

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 June 2012 - 09:40 PM

is it fairly easy to learn without me having to depend on college classes to teach me?


I've always been fairly rubbish with Math but I haven't really come into any trouble, except for when I got to Vectors and matrices but GameDev helped me out with that. You should do fine

also, i was thinking and i wondered do programmers in the industry program off a book for their games? Or do they do all programming from their head? Is it something they know or something that they're reading up and taking from?


I usually program from my head - I'd imagine professionals would do the same?
The majority of Internet Explorer users don't understand the concept of a browsing application, or that there are options.
They just see the big blue 'e' and think "Internet". The thought process usually does not get much deeper than that.

Worms are the weirdest and nicest creatures, and will one day prove themselves to the world.

I love the word Clicky :)

#13 fafase   Members   -  Reputation: 351

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 25 June 2012 - 02:07 AM

My view on maths for game:
you could create a game without math at all, but that won't get far.

Hopefully, engines take the big part of the job for you, collisions, gravity, and so on.

Still, let's say you want to have a simple platform that goes from A to B, knowing your trigonometry will make it real simple. So, math and maybe even more physics are quite required if you want to pass the level of tic-tac-toe.

The math you will need are vectors (a hell of a lot), matrix (well, the hardware will take care of that part but good to know though), trigonometry.
The physics you will need are mechanics mainly and a little of osciallations and waves.

Obviously, that all depends on what you are aiming for.

Fafase.




Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS