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Dedicating my whole life to creating my dream game. Going to college


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#1 Mr.Nayef   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 11:04 PM

Hello guys,

After browsing this site for a bit, I was really impressed by the amount of help people are getting from the community to better their game making experience. That is my main reason for signing up, to seek some assistance.

I just recently finished highschool and I'm not too young(25 years old). I never really took schooling seriously but in the past year I have been putting so much preasure on myself to finish it and I did it in an adult high school.

For the past couple of months I have been reading everything about gaming and how to make them, and like most of the people who are just starting out, I begin to have questions on what langauge to start with.

I think I did my homework in deciding to start learning python first before moving on to other advanced languages. I'm planning to attend algonquin college, and take thier game developement program(3 years). It will be 2013 that I will attend and the only reason I'm going to be starting next year is becauseI need to make money to pay for college (as a pizza delivery guy) ;).

I have one year to prepare myself or learn as much as I can before going to college. For anyone interested, this is the program and the courses offered(highlighting each course would give you an outline of what the student will learn). http://www2.algonquincollege.com/mediaanddesign/program/game-development/

Something about me is that when I put my mind into something, I tend to do it and aim for perfection. Game programming is my passion. I want to create an entire game without having to hire people to help me, in the future. I will dedicate my whole life doing it because this game would effect me and people around me. The story and lore is present already, and a general idea of what kind of game I'm aiming for is as follows.

Game type: Open world action adventure rpg game( think mass effect/ assassins creed/ watch dogs) Its extremely hard, I know but not impossible.
Setting:Very early age(sticks and stones)
Game engine: I don't think I will be aiming at creating my own engine but use ones privided. Paying a license and royalities wouldn't be a problem later on. (it wouldn't hurt to learn how to develope one ofcourse)


Within 5 years time, I'm planning on starting on this dream project, but in the mean time I need to be as ready as possible. Within these 4 years I will be creating small games to get the hang of it(also school projects and whatnot)

oh yea, I only sleep 3 hours a day only because I eat 2 very small meals and exercise alot. Like I said earlier, I'm willing to dedicate my whole time just learning and I have more than 10 hours of free time everyday. I just need a direction from the pro's and see if I'm on the right track. Furthermore, there are many python begginer books and I'm debating on which to buy.


Any comments, suggestions, and/or advice is very welcome.


Cheers

Mr. Nayef

Sponsor:

#2 szecs   Members   -  Reputation: 2098

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 11:22 PM

One thought: Try not to be too obsessed by "aiming for perfection". In the first few years, finishing games will be the most important. Finishing a game and aiming for perfection is a contradiction. There are creations that can never be completely perfect. Maybe programming is the best example for that.
Many newbies make that mistake, and perfecting a tetris' framework for long months, without adding any actual value to the outcome. Just get it done, then move to your next fun project. You will learn more with different games, so that your code will get better and better.

I'm not sure why do you want the final, big game alone. I mean that's fine, there are many great projects like that, but deciding up front is a bit meaningless. You have no idea where you will be in a few years.


Sorry, I believed there will be more thought in my post, but I was wrong.....

Anyway, good luck!

Edited by szecs, 20 June 2012 - 11:26 PM.


#3 ManStaringAtScreen   Members   -  Reputation: 150

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 02:13 AM

I'm a newbie myself so take with a pinch of salt, but it's probably detrimental to plan that far ahead. Aim to educate yourself and work hard, but planning projects 5 years in the distance seems a bit limiting. Good luck anyways!

#4 Narf the Mouse   Members   -  Reputation: 318

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 12:08 PM

Dude. Take care of your physical health before you drop dead of exhaustion. Eating regular, full meals and getting a full nights' sleep are not optional, and you'll pay dearly for the lack.

*Had had sleep apnia for at least a decade and didn't know it*

#5 M6dEEp   Members   -  Reputation: 888

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 01:12 PM

Please get as much sleep as possible, because god knows you won't be getting any once you get into college.

You should probably know that there is a difference between having a passion in programming games, and having a passion in a story and wanting to bring it to life. I mean, you seem like you want to make this game a lot, but once you start programming, you will realize that you probably won't reach the lofty goals you've given yourself for years and years. I really hate being that guy but I think that you should focus on the shorter term, stay as excited as possible and soak up as much as you can. Work on the basics of programming (all of the wax on wax off stuff) and eventually you'll begin to feel more confident while at the same time developing a sense of what is reasonable for one man and what is not. Then and probably only then, will you be able to tackle a game like that.

Also, make sure you have general Computer Science knowledge as well, because what happens if you don't get hired as a game developer straight out of college? You can work QA for god knows how long until someone notices you OR you can become a Software Developer at first and make good money plus earn development experience, and then go home and work on your game until you go to sleep at a reasonable hour (while eating 3 square meals a day plus some snacks).

These are just my 2 cents.

#6 slayemin   Members   -  Reputation: 2050

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 04:31 AM

Also, make sure you have general Computer Science knowledge as well, because what happens if you don't get hired as a game developer straight out of college? You can work QA for god knows how long until someone notices you OR you can become a Software Developer at first and make good money plus earn development experience, and then go home and work on your game until you go to sleep at a reasonable hour (while eating 3 square meals a day plus some snacks).


I think this is worth emphasizing. I would recommend avoiding the "game development" curriculumn. Colleges and universities realize that it is a very popular track, so they advertise it strongly to gain new recruits. Instead, go for the more generalized CS track and use game development as a side project/hobby to keep yourself excited by what you're learning. Work on your games, use the things you learn from class in your game (data structures, algorithms, etc), use the challenges you face in your game dev to ask questions in class, and if you work hard and do things right, you'll graduate with a degree and a polished game in your portfolio.

The hard truth is that just about every university is pursuing the "game design" track because it's popular with students and brings in new recruits. Assuming that they graduate hundreds of students with a degree in game dev, and there are a hundred universities doing this, then you can safely assume that the market for game developers is either over-saturated or the degrees aren't worth much. It's statistically unlikely that most students will become game developers. Game dev is a niche skill, so if it ends up that you're not going to be doing game dev, then the degree isn't going to work very well for you in opening up other career paths. What's your backup plan if all you have is a game dev degree? Take the pragmatic approach: With a more generalized CS degree, you could land a well paying job in a much wider field and it will still be highly relevant to game dev if you choose to go that route.

There's another thing to consider: Game development (in the broad sense) is about more than just writing code. Every game needs art assets, sound, designers, marketing, business infrastructure, project management, etc. You can do any of these things and be a part of the game industry. If you're focused on the programming aspect, make sure that you both like programming and like mathematics. If you don't like programming or math, then when the initial appeal of game dev wears off, its going to be "just another programming job" where you happen to make games instead of desktop applications/widgets/services/drivers etc. At the end of the day, regardless of whether you're making games or other applications, your job is staring at code on a screen and making it do things.

Eric Nevala

Currently a self-employed indie game dev


#7 Zoomulator   Members   -  Reputation: 269

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 06:11 AM

I do programming because I love programming.. and I happen to love games too, so I program games! If you don't have the passion for game programming and you're going about it yourself, it will be really difficult.

I'm also quite artistic, good with sketching and painting, music and so on.. I went down that track first because I thought that was my passion. After a year in art school, it turned out I did more programming in my own time than I spent time on those creative skills. Go figure?

Are you sure you're the programmer type? You got to love solving lots and lots of logical (or somethings not so logical) problems. That has to be a passion, next to the passion for making a game.

There's other ways of coordinating a game project for the ambitious. Realizing what your skills are and what skills you can recruit is essential for any project to reach completion. Do some proper soul searching. Are you really a jack of all trades, passionate for each facet of game development?

I know I'm most focused on the programming. That's why I'm now hiring a friend to make the music, even though I could do it myself. I'll probably get someone to make the art assets too, which I'd also be capable of, but don't really want to spend my time on.

I wouldn't completely crack down on "game dev" collage. It's a chance to do serious networking. Get to know people! Maybe you'll find your game development soul mate. I am chosing CS at university though, because I really want to do programming in depth. Collage is just as much about learning as it is about meeting similarly minded people.

#8 ManStaringAtScreen   Members   -  Reputation: 150

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 09:19 AM

Are you really a jack of all trades, passionate for each facet of game development?

As someone who is beginning to identify with this, does that work for or against me? (consider I want to start my own company eventually, even if it's in handing out flyers)

#9 slayemin   Members   -  Reputation: 2050

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 11:08 AM


Are you really a jack of all trades, passionate for each facet of game development?

As someone who is beginning to identify with this, does that work for or against me? (consider I want to start my own company eventually, even if it's in handing out flyers)

I'd say that it always works in your favor to know how everyone else does their jobs. This helps you work better with your counter-parts and prepares you to become a good project manager. It's also good to have a good mastery of a particular skill since that helps you have a specialty and deep understanding of how it works.

Eric Nevala

Currently a self-employed indie game dev


#10 M6dEEp   Members   -  Reputation: 888

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 03:40 PM



Are you really a jack of all trades, passionate for each facet of game development?

As someone who is beginning to identify with this, does that work for or against me? (consider I want to start my own company eventually, even if it's in handing out flyers)

I'd say that it always works in your favor to know how everyone else does their jobs. This helps you work better with your counter-parts and prepares you to become a good project manager. It's also good to have a good mastery of a particular skill since that helps you have a specialty and deep understanding of how it works.



Plus I think that people who you manage will respect you more if you know their trade and have some applicable knowledge in it. I don't know about anyone else, but I tend to subconsciously look down on people who are "over me" if they have very little Computer Science background; I dunno, maybe I'm arrogant or something. The point is that you can have a lot more authority and respect in any position if you can identify with those you manage and show them that you have experience.

#11 Mr.Nayef   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 10:13 AM

One thought: Try not to be too obsessed by "aiming for perfection". In the first few years, finishing games will be the most important. Finishing a game and aiming for perfection is a contradiction. There are creations that can never be completely perfect. Maybe programming is the best example for that.
Many newbies make that mistake, and perfecting a tetris' framework for long months, without adding any actual value to the outcome. Just get it done, then move to your next fun project. You will learn more with different games, so that your code will get better and better.

I'm not sure why do you want the final, big game alone. I mean that's fine, there are many great projects like that, but deciding up front is a bit meaningless. You have no idea where you will be in a few years.


Sorry, I believed there will be more thought in my post, but I was wrong.....

Anyway, good luck!


Hello Szecs,

No need to be sorry man, I'm here to learn and your post is really helpful for me. It really makes sense what you said about people aiming for perfection and never reaching it. However, I believe perfection is reachable depending on what it means to each person. My definiation of perfection is putting everything I have in my mind in that game and it works flawelessly, nothing more nothing less. Ofcourse, in order to do that, I dedicating a couple of years trialing and erroring( if that is a word :P)

Thank you for your time.

I'm a newbie myself so take with a pinch of salt, but it's probably detrimental to plan that far ahead. Aim to educate yourself and work hard, but planning projects 5 years in the distance seems a bit limiting. Good luck anyways!


Thanky you ManStaringAtScreen. The 5 years is when I will start on the project. If I get a career job, I will be doing it on the side or working on it full time.

By the way, I really like your user name, it's so cool.

Dude. Take care of your physical health before you drop dead of exhaustion. Eating regular, full meals and getting a full nights' sleep are not optional, and you'll pay dearly for the lack.

*Had had sleep apnia for at least a decade and didn't know it*


Hello Narf the Mouse,
I have been sleeping 3 hours a day for the past 2 years. This doctor motivated me and I never looked back since. Check it out

http://tokyokawaiietc.com/archives/3871
I drink the same milk, and it is healthy all around for me. But I don't eat the same meals though. Veriety is good but the key here is not eating heavy.

Please get as much sleep as possible, because god knows you won't be getting any once you get into college.

You should probably know that there is a difference between having a passion in programming games, and having a passion in a story and wanting to bring it to life. I mean, you seem like you want to make this game a lot, but once you start programming, you will realize that you probably won't reach the lofty goals you've given yourself for years and years. I really hate being that guy but I think that you should focus on the shorter term, stay as excited as possible and soak up as much as you can. Work on the basics of programming (all of the wax on wax off stuff) and eventually you'll begin to feel more confident while at the same time developing a sense of what is reasonable for one man and what is not. Then and probably only then, will you be able to tackle a game like that.

Also, make sure you have general Computer Science knowledge as well, because what happens if you don't get hired as a game developer straight out of college? You can work QA for god knows how long until someone notices you OR you can become a Software Developer at first and make good money plus earn development experience, and then go home and work on your game until you go to sleep at a reasonable hour (while eating 3 square meals a day plus some snacks).

These are just my 2 cents.


Hello M6dEEp,

The food and sleeping routine I answered above, but your post is really informative and made me look at the big picture for couple of days now. You are right about one thing and that is if I don't get hired in my career proffesion, what happens next? I asked a couple of friends of a friend of mine who all graduated college/university level computer fields, ranging from technicians, networking, to software engineering, and the best field I found that will suite me is software engineering. It does mean that I will have to go back to adult high school and finish 2 more prerequisits (chamistry and physics grade 12's) but it is no problem.

As for the one man capablities, like I said, I'm willing to dedicate my whole life for it and that means, 5,10, 15, or 20 years just making it. Why you make ask? I planned to keep it personal because of how the whole community views cetain beliefs but to give people an idea of why I'm going that route is not because of money and never will be. It is spreading a massage to the world that will reward me hopefully for this life and after life. When your main aim is afterlife, dedicating your whole life to gain rewards there would make all your years bareable, exciting, passionate, fun, or however you may look at it. As long as you stick to a path that will please the created and the creator. That should be enough to see where I'm coming from.

Thanks for your contribution, really appreciate it.

I think this is worth emphasizing. I would recommend avoiding the "game development" curriculumn. Colleges and universities realize that it is a very popular track, so they advertise it strongly to gain new recruits. Instead, go for the more generalized CS track and use game development as a side project/hobby to keep yourself excited by what you're learning. Work on your games, use the things you learn from class in your game (data structures, algorithms, etc), use the challenges you face in your game dev to ask questions in class, and if you work hard and do things right, you'll graduate with a degree and a polished game in your portfolio.

The hard truth is that just about every university is pursuing the "game design" track because it's popular with students and brings in new recruits. Assuming that they graduate hundreds of students with a degree in game dev, and there are a hundred universities doing this, then you can safely assume that the market for game developers is either over-saturated or the degrees aren't worth much. It's statistically unlikely that most students will become game developers. Game dev is a niche skill, so if it ends up that you're not going to be doing game dev, then the degree isn't going to work very well for you in opening up other career paths. What's your backup plan if all you have is a game dev degree? Take the pragmatic approach: With a more generalized CS degree, you could land a well paying job in a much wider field and it will still be highly relevant to game dev if you choose to go that route.

There's another thing to consider: Game development (in the broad sense) is about more than just writing code. Every game needs art assets, sound, designers, marketing, business infrastructure, project management, etc. You can do any of these things and be a part of the game industry. If you're focused on the programming aspect, make sure that you both like programming and like mathematics. If you don't like programming or math, then when the initial appeal of game dev wears off, its going to be "just another programming job" where you happen to make games instead of desktop applications/widgets/services/drivers etc. At the end of the day, regardless of whether you're making games or other applications, your job is staring at code on a screen and making it do things.


Hello slayemin' timestamp,

Your take on it so true about universities putting this major in there to attract students and nothing else. I talked to a person who went into a similar course in another country and he had to go back to take computer science but only finished it in 1 year and a half, (having had some pre-requeists already in teh game developement program)

I do programming because I love programming.. and I happen to love games too, so I program games! If you don't have the passion for game programming and you're going about it yourself, it will be really difficult.

I'm also quite artistic, good with sketching and painting, music and so on.. I went down that track first because I thought that was my passion. After a year in art school, it turned out I did more programming in my own time than I spent time on those creative skills. Go figure?

Are you sure you're the programmer type? You got to love solving lots and lots of logical (or somethings not so logical) problems. That has to be a passion, next to the passion for making a game.

There's other ways of coordinating a game project for the ambitious. Realizing what your skills are and what skills you can recruit is essential for any project to reach completion. Do some proper soul searching. Are you really a jack of all trades, passionate for each facet of game development?

I know I'm most focused on the programming. That's why I'm now hiring a friend to make the music, even though I could do it myself. I'll probably get someone to make the art assets too, which I'd also be capable of, but don't really want to spend my time on.

I wouldn't completely crack down on "game dev" collage. It's a chance to do serious networking. Get to know people! Maybe you'll find your game development soul mate. I am chosing CS at university though, because I really want to do programming in depth. Collage is just as much about learning as it is about meeting similarly minded people.


Hello Zoomulator,

I'm really passionate in pleasing my creator and all the other routes are already fulfilled, so I'm starting a new one through games. It is never about popularity, or money, but the purpose is what is important.

Thank you

Mr. Nayef

#12 M6dEEp   Members   -  Reputation: 888

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 03:23 PM

The food and sleeping routine I answered above, but your post is really informative and made me look at the big picture for couple of days now. You are right about one thing and that is if I don't get hired in my career proffesion, what happens next? I asked a couple of friends of a friend of mine who all graduated college/university level computer fields, ranging from technicians, networking, to software engineering, and the best field I found that will suite me is software engineering. It does mean that I will have to go back to adult high school and finish 2 more prerequisits (chamistry and physics grade 12's) but it is no problem.

As for the one man capablities, like I said, I'm willing to dedicate my whole life for it and that means, 5,10, 15, or 20 years just making it. Why you make ask? I planned to keep it personal because of how the whole community views cetain beliefs but to give people an idea of why I'm going that route is not because of money and never will be. It is spreading a massage to the world that will reward me hopefully for this life and after life. When your main aim is afterlife, dedicating your whole life to gain rewards there would make all your years bareable, exciting, passionate, fun, or however you may look at it. As long as you stick to a path that will please the created and the creator. That should be enough to see where I'm coming from.

Thanks for your contribution, really appreciate it.


All I ask is for people to really stop and look at all the angles before they commit to life changing decisions... I know, I know that is probably to much to ask ;). I'm glad you took what I said to heart and you're focusing on your education and finding out what is best for you. I think software engineering is probably the most fundamental part of computer science. Everyone has done some kind engineering if they've written more than a few lines of code, so it is a very good and safe choice as far as job security and options go.

Also, I think that doctor is nuts.. but if it has been working for you for the past 2 years then I tip my hat to you because you are a badass.

#13 DevLiquidKnight   Members   -  Reputation: 834

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 12:20 AM

I have been sleeping 3 hours a day for the past 2 years. This doctor motivated me and I never looked back since. Check it out

I really hope this is a bit of a joke, this seems very very unhealthy, and a quick way to death. I'd imagine the CDC has better recommendations then one random quack doctor. http://www.cdc.gov/s...much_sleep.htm/

I also would suggest pursuing a computer science degree over a game orientated degree.

Edited by DevLiquidKnight, 27 June 2012 - 03:03 PM.


#14 diegzumillo   Members   -  Reputation: 235

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 03:46 AM

Just dropping by to give my 2 cents. I'm a hobbyist game developer.

I also have a "pet project", something special for me etc. I'm not an experienced game dev, so if I try to tackle this project I'll be overwhelmed and frustrated. There's a big chance it never sees the light of day. Instead, I'm focusing on smaller projects, that are still fun and interesting enough for me to be motivated. This way I learn a lot, get closer to actually making my pet project and won't feel so bad if it reaches a dead end, I just move on to the next one.

#15 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 8671

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 08:22 AM

...


Hello Szecs,...

...


Thanky you ManStaringAtScreen. ...

...


Hello Narf the Mouse,
I have been sleeping 3 hours a day for the past 2 years. This doctor motivated me and I never looked back since. Check it out
http://tokyokawaiiet...m/archives/3871

...


Hello M6dEEp,...

...


Hello slayemin' timestamp,...

...


Hello Zoomulator, ...

Thank you
Mr. Nayef


Mr. Nayef,

1. When replying to someone's post, it's reader-friendly to only quote the part to which you are replying. If you include the entire message and reply to one point, a reader who doesn't want to read the entire message still has to scroll down through it. Your post of last night is four screens tall. It could be cut in half easily.

2. Do you have a question the forum members can help you with? If so, could you encapsulate it for us? What I see above is that you've told us your plan, and people have commented on it, and you've replied to their comments. If the above is all just a friendly chat, this ought to be in the Lounge. For all I can tell from the above, this could all just be your way of posting SEO links (so far, to a school degree program and a spammy-looking Japanophile-oriented blog/magazine).

-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#16 Dwarf King   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1698

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 08:47 AM

oh yea, I only sleep 3 hours a day only because I eat 2 very small meals and exercise alot. Like I said earlier, I'm willing to dedicate my whole time just learning and I have more than 10 hours of free time everyday. I just need a direction from the pro's and see if I'm on the right track. Furthermore, there are many python begginer books and I'm debating on which to buy.


Sorry to say this, but without sleep the chance you will end up at a mental hospital is greater than ever finishing a game. Get some sleep man! Eat more and keep on exercising,

Oh and ya here is a good python book to buy: http://www.amazon.co...06&sr=8-1-spell

I found it very well written and a great place to start. Oh and you will need this link too: http://docs.python.org/tutorial/ as it is a nice pace to go when getting into the more fun part of coding projects Posted Image

Oh and once again... GET SOME SLEEP!!!! Posted Image

Edited by Dwarf King, 27 June 2012 - 08:48 AM.

"The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education"

Albert Einstein

"It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education"

Albert Einstein

 


#17 aattss   Members   -  Reputation: 373

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 09:07 AM

Are you using that strange sleeping schedule where you sleep 20 to 30 minutes every 4 to 6 hours? If so, then be warned that, even if you get the REM sleep needed to stay mentally healthy, your body is probably skipping steps to restore nutrients and muscles and to relieve stress and whatnot. I image it's best as a short-term solution, but it isn't a good idea in the long term. Your doctor should know, though.

Keep in mind that, if you're going to devote your whole life to a single game, then you need a solid financial basis, and a source of income. Some, like Dwarf Fortress, survive on donations, but most only survive on selling beta access.

#18 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 8671

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 09:36 AM

This topic needs to get off the quack doctor's sleep theory.
Consider the possibility that the link is actually spam, and not really a lifestyle the OP has espoused. Consider also the wackiness level of dedicating one's whole life to one game idea.
What I'm saying is, let's maintain a healthy skeptical frame of mind as regards this topic, and wait to see when the OP comes back and what else he has to say.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#19 L. Spiro   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 12290

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 09:08 AM

Although I am starting by mentioning eating habits, I promise to also address the actual issue.

Firstly, I happen to live in the same city as that doctor, and it is fairly common knowledge that he is a quack. I also happen to know this for a fact because I myself am one of the many examples of living proof.
I have battled anorexia all my life, despite eating 5 full-sized meals daily and going on diets consisting of extra-cheese Macaroni & Cheese, peanut butter straight from the jar, 3 pizzas daily, and weight-gain formula after all 5 meals.
No matter how many times, how much, or what I ate, I have never in my life been able to sleep. I currently have a prescription for drugs that are illegal in America (Rohypnol) and I often still can’t sleep even at 4 times the average dose.

Sleeping and eating are not related, and all Japanese people know this (many of my friends eat a normal 3-per-day meal and sleep around 10 hours daily, which would require 5 meals per day according to that doctor), and they know this doctor is a quack. So stop being an idiot and start eating correctly.



As for your actual issue, it is fine if you want to “dedicate your life” to something, but being so specific is foolish. For example, I have had many dream projects of my own that I swear to get done some day. But I dedicated my life to video games in general, not just a few games (or even more idiotic, one specific game) that I dreamed up.
It is just common sense. No one is going to hire you to make your game. They are going to hire you to make games, period, so if that is how you dedicated your life then you can actually get a job and start saving towards the actual game you want to make.

If no one hires you to make your game, what is your plan? Work at McDonald’s until you can make your game?
Obviously working in the industry making generic not-your-own-idea games is more fun than that so that is what you will be doing to get some income and possibly finance your dream game. So it only makes sense that your dedication should be towards making games in general, and making your own game should be a patiently awaited second place.

With that being said, your question seems premature.
As I said, I have my dream games too, and the platform and way of making those games has changed as my experience has grown.
You will do the same. If your goal is to start your game in about 5 years, none of our answers now will have any meaning. By then everything will be different.
I was originally planning Nintendo DS, but now I am planning iOS.

And I reiterate that it is not just the platforms that change. As you grow in experience you become braver towards certain features. Your experience in developing games makes you more bold and you start to have grander expectations.
It is basically catch-22.
If you have to ask, our answers have no meaning because by the time you are ready things will be so different.
If you have experience, you don’t have to ask.

So this question should basically never take place.

Get yourself geared towards general game development, get into the industry, and use your own experience to answer the questions you just asked. Your own ideas will change as you grow so there is no point in anyone answering this for you. Only you can answer it, and only over a period of time.

There is nothing special about your situation (except that you laugh at my struggle to sleep every time you eat only 2 small meals daily) so searching this site will provide all the answers you need in regards to preparing for your future.


L. Spiro

Edited by L. Spiro, 01 July 2012 - 06:32 PM.

It is amazing how often people try to be unique, and yet they are always trying to make others be like them. - L. Spiro 2011
I spent most of my life learning the courage it takes to go out and get what I want. Now that I have it, I am not sure exactly what it is that I want. - L. Spiro 2013
I went to my local Subway once to find some guy yelling at the staff. When someone finally came to take my order and asked, “May I help you?”, I replied, “Yeah, I’ll have one asshole to go.”
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#20 Destin Bales   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 12:49 AM

Mr. Nayef,

Check out Mount & Blade when you get a chance. This was originally created by two people - a husband and wife team, and may serve as a good (healthy) inspiration to your cause.

Good luck!

- Destin
www.ineedtomakegames.com




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