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Trying To Run SDL on Visual Studio 2012


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#1 ajm113   Members   -  Reputation: 294

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 08:21 PM

Hello all, I'm trying to convert a project of mine from Visual Studio 2008 to Visual Studio 2012 RC that uses SDL, and I've ran into a few problems... Most of them I was able to fix, but now I'm just stuck. What I did:

1. Converted my project from 2008 to 2012.
2. Visual Studio didn't like that "SDLmain.lib" was not "SAFESEH" safe.
3. Got SDL 2.1 Jan 20th snapshot source code, and rebuilt it on 2012 using release build and no project setting changes.
4. Got the new libs, and SDL.dll and placed them in the correct destinations where SDL was installed.

Everything built perfectly fine under Visual Studio 2012, but when I ran my project, I get a SDL.dll cannot be found error. The dll is placed in the same directory as my exe, and where SDL is installed, I've updated them both to the 2012 version build, and I still get the same error.

Here is my build 2012 libs of SDL.
http://www.mediafire...clvn8axmydposjf


I'm not sure if some how the DLL is corrupted or there is a new setting in Visual Studio 2012 I don't know about building libraries or what, but any information would be appreciated since I haven't found anyone on this topic! P.S I just got 2012 today, so I haven't been up to date on what changes where made, so I'm just learning as I go, as I always do.

EDIT: Wooow, never mind... I fixed this myself, by putting the dlls in. "(project name)/Debug"... I'm kinda surprised they would relocate the execution position when you debug/release run your project. Let me ask this then... Why this change? I kinda like the new layout changes they made, but I'm not too happy to the new look really...

Thanks, Andrew.

Edited by ajm113, 08 July 2012 - 09:24 PM.

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#2 BitMaster   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3930

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 06:22 AM

In every MSVC setup since the 2005 version (possibly before but my memory is too hazy on this), the default project setup I have experienced has always been to create Debug/Release subfolders for the different builds. When building (at least) two different configurations of the same program you have to do that (that is: store the builds in different directories; not necessary those exact two directories) or ensure every intermediate file and final file has a different name. If you don't do that you either have to do a full rebuild on every compile or risk linking files from two different configurations (which will fail at best and crash in an obscure manner at worst).

#3 Acotoz   Members   -  Reputation: 73

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 03:28 PM

Visual Studio from 2008 and up = Pure Garbage.

That why I stick to 2005.

Good luck

#4 ajm113   Members   -  Reputation: 294

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 10:01 PM

@BitMaster, thanks that makes more sense now come to think of it and it works better. ^^ Thanks for your post!

@Acotoz What don't you like about the newer ones if I may ask?

... Great Mediafire thinks I'm illegally redistributing something, even though I'm following GNU guidelines and the SDL website's... -__- I love how hosting companies overact and don't look up information a little more first that takes 5 seconds.

Edited by ajm113, 09 July 2012 - 10:04 PM.

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#5 BitMaster   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3930

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 01:31 AM

I don't have the exact change set in my head anymore but I remember a huge relief going from MSVC 2005 to 2008 because several standard required thingies were working and some bugs were fixed (on the other hand MSVC 2008 also introduced a different set of bugs, some of which have not been fixed today). Going from MSVC 2008 to MSVC 2010 might be a different issue because while Intellisense got much better, it also increased its system requirements. I never noticed that but I heard from some people on lower end systems that it could get quite tiresome to work back then.

The idle banter aside, I would say in Acotoz we have a clear case of how user rating displays the quality of a user's responses. Even under the assumption that everything up from MSVC 2008 was indeed "pure garbage", I would never suggest staying with MSVC 2005 then. Too many things were broken there (especially some interesting template stuff) and it will never get C++11 support.
I you cannot stand MSVC for some reason, then investigate the other compilers and IDEs. Several free possibilities are available as well.

#6 ajm113   Members   -  Reputation: 294

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 09:17 AM

I did feel that too going from 2005 to 2008, it just felt right when I was using 2008. Now I feel like I'm cheating on it, since I've been using it since it first came out.

Yes, maybe use something like codeblocks, it's simple and it's somewhat close to VS2005 Acotoz.


Edited by ajm113, 10 July 2012 - 09:18 AM.

Check out my open source code projects/libraries! My Homepage You may learn something.




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