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common client/server IO volume & rates


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#1 ChristerSwahn   Members   -  Reputation: 198

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 02:11 AM

I'm curious as to what are "usual" client/server data volume, throughput rates and tick/update frequencies nowadays. (In realtime multiplayer games.)

It would be interesting to hear reasons for or against higher number of smaller updates per second versus lower number with greater size.

Would anybody like to share their experience on this?

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#2 hplus0603   Moderators   -  Reputation: 5162

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 05:06 PM

Your question reminds me of this question:

How long is a typical piece of string these days?


Typically, when throughput goes up, you'll use additional throughput to support more players, rather than letting each player generate more data.

Other than that, a social browser game may make very different design decisions than an Xbox Live AAA FPS game, which again is different from the next EverQuest/WoW/EVE killer.


enum Bool { True, False, FileNotFound };

#3 ChristerSwahn   Members   -  Reputation: 198

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 01:36 AM

Yes right. Perhaps I should have been more detailed in my question! ;)

I'm interested in trade-offs between package frequency and size being made nowadays in production grade real-time multiplayer games, and what bandwidth and latency game developers assume/require the players to have.

In the MMO I'm working on I'm currently sending world state updates in the range of 1-5 kb, 5-10 times per second. It's a strategy MMO and as such doesn't quite have the precision requirements of an FPS. But I have yet to write a more advanced package splitting and data compressing logic. I don't know if that is likely to be necessary so I'm curious at what others are doing regarding network IO performance.

#4 hplus0603   Moderators   -  Reputation: 5162

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 12:50 PM

Is that "b" as in "bits," or "B" as in "Bytes?"

1 kilobyte per packet, 5-10 times per second, per player, sounds like an order of magnitude too much for a first-order approximation. Then again, if it enables gameplay that you really want, and you (and your players) can provide that bandwidth, then it might be fine.

In general, the "fast action" games on consoles trend towards sending fewer packets with better prediction -- although "fewer" in that case might mean 15 per second. Each packet is usually tiny, though -- a few hundred bytes, at most.

enum Bool { True, False, FileNotFound };




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